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Standard User roraz
(member) Wed 06-May-15 11:51:48
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Socket to infinity modem cable?


[link to this post]
 
I have recently had infinity broadband installed, however the placement of my socket in relation to the nearest power socket isnt great (without loads of extension cables being used which isn't ideal).

I was just wondering what is the cable between the infinity socket and modem called and can you get longer ones?
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 06-May-15 11:56:49
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Re: Socket to infinity modem cable?


[re: roraz] [link to this post]
 
RJ11 twisted pair cable £2.95 with free delivery for a 5m cable on Amazon other lengths are available, and higher prices on the high street if its a job you want to do today.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User dave2150
(experienced) Wed 06-May-15 17:22:49
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Re: Socket to infinity modem cable?


[re: roraz] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by roraz:
I have recently had infinity broadband installed, however the placement of my socket in relation to the nearest power socket isnt great (without loads of extension cables being used which isn't ideal).

I was just wondering what is the cable between the infinity socket and modem called and can you get longer ones?


The longer the RJ11 cable between your master socket and modem - the lower speed your modem will connect at.

Every cm of cable will reduce the speed you'll get. Depending on your line characteristics, you may or may not notice this.

I replaced the standard length rj11 cable with a 0.5M RJ11 cable from Tandy, and I gained 1.5mbit downspeed sync, though your mileage will vary.

I'd not recommend you get a long cable, if you want the maximum sync speed.

Here's the cable I bought, if you're interested:

Tandy 0.5M RJ11


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Standard User mugwumpx
(committed) Thu 07-May-15 16:36:55
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Re: Socket to infinity modem cable?


[re: dave2150] [link to this post]
 
With that sort of difference it makes the quality of the original cable look suspect. You should not see that sort of difference by using a shorter cable compared to the standard one.

Mugwump

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Standard User TheEulerID
(member) Thu 07-May-15 19:35:36
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Re: Socket to infinity modem cable?


[re: dave2150] [link to this post]
 
That's just down to [censored] cable. Which, to be fair, most modem cables are. If you use an RJ11-RJ11 cable made up with good quality UTP cable then the effect of speed is insignificant (unless you start using 10s of metres of it).

Of more importance is avoiding bridged taps by filtering any non-broadband extensions at source. That is at the master socket.
Standard User dave2150
(experienced) Thu 07-May-15 23:37:40
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Re: Socket to infinity modem cable?


[re: mugwumpx] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by mugwumpx:
With that sort of difference it makes the quality of the original cable look suspect. You should not see that sort of difference by using a shorter cable compared to the standard one.



It was the cable supplied with the HG612 modem.

Regardless, the laws of physics dictate that decreasing the loop length by even 1cm results in less attenuation, even if it is an infinitesimal difference.

Standard User TheEulerID
(member) Thu 07-May-15 23:52:03
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Re: Socket to infinity modem cable?


[re: dave2150] [link to this post]
 
That attenuation will increase fractionally is not the issue. It's that the difference of a metre length will be tiny. Think about it. Just 1 metre in perhaps 4,000 metres. The real problem is cheap modem cables aren't twisted pair and are therefore vulnerable to interference. The one you bought is UTP, which makes all the difference.
Standard User dave2150
(experienced) Fri 08-May-15 00:28:49
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Re: Socket to infinity modem cable?


[re: TheEulerID] [link to this post]
 
This is the FTTC/FTTP forum, so it's safe to assume we're talking about FTTC, which typically has far shorter line lengths than the 4000M you suggest. Some of lines of less than 100M, 200M, 300M etc is quite common.

On VDSL2 and G.FAST etc, every meter counts.

Increased attenuation, by using meters of cable as you suggest, will result in a higher attuenuation than without it. For some lines, this can make a big difference. For other lines, they might not notice a difference.

My 0.5M Twisted Pair RJ11 cable cost only £2.99 - worth every penny for my line at least.

Edited by dave2150 (Fri 08-May-15 00:29:33)

Standard User RobertoS
(elder) Fri 08-May-15 01:49:07
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Re: Socket to infinity modem cable?


[re: TheEulerID] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by TheEulerID:
Of more importance is avoiding bridged taps by filtering any non-broadband extensions at source. That is at the master socket.
There are many installations with the star centre between the incoming cable and the master socket. Including some that have NTE5s.

I accept that the majority are as you say.

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Standard User hoopla
(member) Thu 14-May-15 16:59:53
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Re: Socket to infinity modem cable?


[re: roraz] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by roraz:
I have recently had infinity broadband installed, however the placement of my socket in relation to the nearest power socket isnt great (without loads of extension cables being used which isn't ideal).
Don't be daft! Running a wire to take power to the modem won't affect your speeds, but running a wire to take the phone line to the modem will.

You don't need to have loads of extension cables. If necessary, make a 50 metre long mains extension for it. The wire can be the slimmest mains lead you can find: the power going down it is minimal.
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