General Discussion
  >> Fibre Broadband


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.


Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | (show all)   Print Thread
Standard User MaryHinge
(member) Tue 29-Nov-16 19:27:58
Print Post

Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[link to this post]
 
Apologies if this has already been posted, but I don't recall seeing it before. Nothing new really but it contains glimpses of the connectorised equipment etc.

https://youtu.be/ouSB_3c_fm8
Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Tue 29-Nov-16 23:32:31
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MaryHinge] [link to this post]
 
Yeah I saw that a little while back.

I like the new modular DP hardware on the pole and in the chamber.

Not too sure on removing the need for the outside CSP box. Having the fibre go from the new DP up the pole or in the chamber all the way into the home is a bad move I say.

What happens later on if the fibre cable breaks outside where it enters the home (BT are responsible for this side), BT will have to install / blow in a complete new set of fibres, where as with a CSP its just the new pre made fibre cable that needs to be replaced.

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest
Standard User WWWombat
(knowledge is power) Wed 30-Nov-16 02:37:58
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MaryHinge] [link to this post]
 
s'Funny. I saw a version of that video a while ago - I recognise the bit where the van drives from the exchange, and parks by the church, and they start work by that "Clophill" sign.

But they didn't include any of the information about the actual nodes or the new connection blocks.


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.

Standard User MaryHinge
(member) Wed 30-Nov-16 07:56:33
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
One thing I've never been certain of is are both ends of the final dropwire connectorised and available in varying lengths?

If so I assume they just drill a larger diameter hole into the building to accommodate the connector at the customer end.
Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 30-Nov-16 09:01:23
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MaryHinge] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by MaryHinge:
One thing I've never been certain of is are both ends of the final dropwire connectorised and available in varying lengths?

If so I assume they just drill a larger diameter hole into the building to accommodate the connector at the customer end.

Are you referring to the cable from the CSP to the ONT?
If so its a pre-made cable that is fed from inside the home and out through the drilled hole in the wall and then cut to length and spliced to the main drop / blown fibre cable.

If you are referring to what is in the video, its just tubing with a metal wire down one side for strength and the fibre is then blown through it.

Also the drop / blown fibre cable is in fact 4 smaller fibres, which I was told is for extra services etc.

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest
Standard User Zarjaz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Wed 30-Nov-16 09:04:57
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
I think he was on about the new connectorised stuff .... and his question is one that had crossed my mind too.

Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 30-Nov-16 09:16:15
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: Zarjaz] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Zarjaz:
I think he was on about the new connectorised stuff .... and his question is one that had crossed my mind too.

Yeah, I thought that too after posting.

That really is a good question...
I am assuming at the new DP end the connector is just glue moulded to the fibre cable that gets blown down the tubing and the same is down inside the home.

For it to hold the fibre the glue would have to go inside the tubing and the connector.
I know the actual underground cables is the same thickness as what is installed here.

Like I said in my first reply here, I can see it becoming an issue if there is a break in the cable later on, requiring a complete new install.

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 30-Nov-16 10:06:15
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
The end going into the house has no connector on, and is mechanically spliced onto a connector once in the right position indoors.

Have a photo somewhere but if I recall not one of my best ones see http://blog.thinkbroadband.com/wp-content/uploads/20... that is the end that goes into home, the black is stripped off once inside the building to leave a white outer.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 30-Nov-16 10:42:00
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Oh, so its actually different fibre cable and not the same as what I have where they install the over head drop down tubing and then blow the fibre containing the 4 smaller fibres due the tube.

Going by that image it seems that actual fibre is thinker than what we used at work 20 to 25 years ago when we taught the BT Engineers back in the 90's smile

I assume it doesn't require the metal wire that comes moulded in the tubing like with the old way.

At least the actual fibre is thicker, so it should be stronger, how well does it bend?
I know the 3 fibres I have was very bendy going by the chunk that they cut off.

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 30-Nov-16 10:59:59
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
Its EZ bend type radius so around skirting etc is fine

Fibre will bend further without breaking, but causes light refraction issues hence minimum bend radius specs for different cable types.

No metal wire, but Kevlar for strength, its good for a 100lb pull weight if I recall. Somewhere have some more shots from Openreach HQ where they have samples out on the side in the demo room.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User Zarjaz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Wed 30-Nov-16 11:14:24
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
OK, so that's one question answered .... but what of the kit that fits the connectorised end on said cable ?

Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 30-Nov-16 11:33:05
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: Zarjaz] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Zarjaz:
OK, so that's one question answered .... but what of the kit that fits the connectorised end on said cable ?

I am thinking its either glued on, or if they are metal connectors they could be thermally connected.

Hard to tell without any images so I am probably wrong in both counts LOL

Those modular connections do look cool though.

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest
Standard User godsell4
(member) Wed 30-Nov-16 12:05:26
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MaryHinge] [link to this post]
 
So in a location where at the moment there is no ducting, just poles carrying copper wires to a group of properties which are currently connected to an FTTC enabled cabinet.

If BTO are going to install FTTP, where would that large Aggregation Node go? On a pole or ? This is to supply about 60 properties.

PlusNet Unlimited Fibre 3Mb to 5Mb
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 30-Nov-16 13:02:48
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YKigH99Zdc Not sure on exact make/model they use but similar will work

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 30-Nov-16 13:18:03
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Ah, so in that video its crimped smile

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest
Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 30-Nov-16 13:29:21
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: godsell4] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by godsell4:
So in a location where at the moment there is no ducting, just poles carrying copper wires to a group of properties which are currently connected to an FTTC enabled cabinet.

If BTO are going to install FTTP, where would that large Aggregation Node go? On a pole or ? This is to supply about 60 properties.

The Aggregation Node will probably be down the road or could also be outside the actual exchange, but normally are in one of BT's chambers, the fibre cable then leave that chamber and can possibly then use over head cables from pole to pole connecting to Splitter Nodes.

The Splitter Node on the other hand are normally in the chamber near the are it supports, the DP's can be located in the chambers near the phone poles, or the DP's can be mounted on the actual phone poles.

TBH I have only seen Aggregation and Splitter Nodes and DP's all located in the chambers, so I cannot really say for sure.

*** update ***
Basically my understanding was that the fibre leaves the exchange and goes into the Aggregation Nodes that are daisy chained, each of those Aggregation Nodes supplies fibres to a few Splitter Nodes that are also daisy chained, and each of those Splitter Nodes supply fibres for the Fibre DP's which are also daisy chained each supplying up to 12 fibres for 12 homes.


Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest

Edited by PaulKirby (Wed 30-Nov-16 13:48:46)

Standard User godsell4
(member) Wed 30-Nov-16 13:58:28
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
Thank you, that is what I have seen too.

The only chamber and cabinets which exist are immediately next to the exchange, there are no other ducts or chambers, all the wires go over poles to those 60 properties. The first property we plan for FTTP is about 900m from the exchange with the last being +4km away, all properties are dotted along one long lane with little or no room for any cabinets to be built, the lane has stone walls or buildings marking the road. If this CFP with BT goes ahead it will be interesting to see how those problems are solved.

PlusNet Unlimited Fibre 3Mb to 5Mb
Standard User MaryHinge
(member) Wed 30-Nov-16 15:42:43
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YKigH99Zdc Not sure on exact make/model they use but similar will work


That answers my question, I always wondered if some form of mechanical splicing was possible. Still quite fiddly but presumably requires a less skilled engineer than fusion splicing.

I assume the db loss is greater than fusion splicing so they still fusion splice at the SPN?

So in summary connectorisation means two less fusion splices (DP & CSP) and probably a less skilled engineer, hence the cost savings compared with the previous deployment method.
Standard User MaryHinge
(member) Wed 30-Nov-16 15:54:49
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MaryHinge] [link to this post]
 
Just answered my own question http://www.fiber-optic-solutions.com/mechanical-spli...

0.3db loss mechanical vs 0.1 db loss fusion, and the mechanical splice is quite a bit more expensive.
Standard User WWWombat
(knowledge is power) Wed 30-Nov-16 16:35:48
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: MaryHinge] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by MaryHinge:
So in summary connectorisation means two less fusion splices (DP & CSP) and probably a less skilled engineer, hence the cost savings compared with the previous deployment method.


Yes, that's precisely why they've changed over (or are in the process of changing over) to doing this method.

There's a video where Neil McRae describes some of the changes & reasoning:
https://youtu.be/LLpk2dz6nBQ?t=582
Standard User WWWombat
(knowledge is power) Wed 30-Nov-16 16:50:36
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by PaulKirby:

each of those Aggregation Nodes supplies fibres to a few Splitter Nodes that are also daisy chained, and each of those Splitter Nodes supply fibres for the Fibre DP's which are also daisy chained each supplying up to 12 fibres for 12 homes.


The basic dimensioning that BT had for the underground nodes were:
- 12 splitter nodes per AN
- 48 splitter devices per AN; 4 splitter devices per splitter node
- 1536 end users per AN
- 128 end users per splitter node
- 32 end users per splitter device
- up to 20 end users per fibre DP

The daisy-chain of aggregation nodes would take in a cable with up to 288 fibres, bound in elements of 12 fibres together. The intention is that the fibres that will continue on down the chain do not get cut/spliced in intermediate ANs; those elements just get looped, and tucked away inbetween the splice trays.

With the dimensioning above, you'd expect that at least 48 E-side fibres get pulled off the spine in each AN, plus some spares. A spine could have 4-6 AN's.

Each AN could perhaps serve properties that today are on 3-4 separate PCPs.

* - These numbers were all before connectorisation was started. That process looks like it is more likely to have smaller DPs (8, 12 or 16, rather than 20), and make use of 2 levels of split.
Standard User WWWombat
(knowledge is power) Wed 30-Nov-16 17:03:30
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: godsell4] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by godsell4:
If BTO are going to install FTTP, where would that large Aggregation Node go? On a pole or ? This is to supply about 60 properties.


I suspect that AN's will always go underground.

Splitter nodes could be underground, as in the video, or they could go in green boxes on the side of some telegraph poles (as could fibre DPs).
One architecture that might apply where overhead distribution happens: http://www.optservices.eu/FTTP%20-%202%20Level%20of%...

The connector blocks for the newer install could be found underground, or at the top of the poles (as in the video).
MrS has some photos that apply in this case:
http://blog.thinkbroadband.com/2015/09/g-fast-and-fo...

and

http://blog.thinkbroadband.com/2016/06/a-peek-at-the...
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 30-Nov-16 17:35:19
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: WWWombat] [link to this post]
 
And have seen most of that kit in other locations when not had someone from Openreach in tow smile

Not the stuff in pavement chambers I should highlight as I don't go lifting the slabs randomly, but pole mounted kit

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Thu 01-Dec-16 03:17:45
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: WWWombat] [link to this post]
 
Maybe I am not understanding him right, but either that guy has no clue what he's talking about, or he has been given incorrect information.

Or maybe they are misleading people to choose this new way of installing FTTP.

Our FTTP only took about 2 hours tops to do both external and internal work and we was up and running.

How can he say it takes almost a day to install FTTP to a customers home where it only take a few hours.

Or am I missing something here.

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Thu 01-Dec-16 10:10:22
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
Sample of one issues...

For some areas yes existing system can take a shorter time, especially if the engineer doing the external box also does the internal run. The new fibre is strong enough when going through the final duct to clear the odd small blockage on its own, just need to cut off the dirty bit plus a bit of leeway.

The connectorised system should be faster overall, especially when going down a street of modern style build. Its a move away from the over engineered solution towards something that others are happy doing across the globe and accepting the small losses from the mechanical connections rather than fusion splicing where at all possible.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User WWWombat
(knowledge is power) Fri 02-Dec-16 00:52:08
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
Some of the changes help in between the splitter and the new connector block (that replaces the DP and manifold). Primarily to reduce the need for digging out blocked ducts. This is before the install day.

Other changes help reduce the on-the-day installation. Primarily the lack of splicing, so no need to set up that hardware, and blowing, so need to setup compressor and hardware. The peelable fibre helps, I guess, by keeping one length of fibre, but which copes with both indoor (low smoke) requirements, and outdoor (UV safe) too.

There's probably some difference in getting the new fibre to the property vs getting the old tube, but I don't know the real impact there. Maybe it too deals with blockages better.

Was yours an aerial feed? Maybe that took away duct issues for you
Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Fri 02-Dec-16 02:33:46
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: WWWombat] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by WWWombat:
Some of the changes help in between the splitter and the new connector block (that replaces the DP and manifold). Primarily to reduce the need for digging out blocked ducts. This is before the install day.

I am aware of what it replaces, but if the ducting is blocked it will still need to be cleared out no matter if it used the old or new proposed method.

In reply to a post by WWWombat:
Other changes help reduce the on-the-day installation. Primarily the lack of splicing, so no need to set up that hardware, and blowing, so need to setup compressor and hardware. The peelable fibre helps, I guess, by keeping one length of fibre, but which copes with both indoor (low smoke) requirements, and outdoor (UV safe) too.

This I can see as being better, however the splicing of a single fibre only take a couple of mins to actually do, where as the new way the engineer has to stip off the end put the modular connector which has to be crimmped which probaly still take a couple of mins, so no speed gained there.

I think with my external install they setup all the gear while they was doing the actual install, so everything was ready when they needed to blow and join the fibre, but yeah if everything was done when it was needed then yes it would of taken longer to do, so in this case the new way might be better.

In reply to a post by WWWombat:
There's probably some difference in getting the new fibre to the property vs getting the old tube, but I don't know the real impact there. Maybe it too deals with blockages better.

Not too sure on this one, either way will still have to tackle possible blockages.

In reply to a post by WWWombat:
Was yours an aerial feed? Maybe that took away duct issues for you

Well our Splitter Node is located the bottom of our road in an underground chamber, all those fibres all get daisy chained through all the DP's all underground in the chambers all the way up to our DP where it goes up the phone pole to our manifold, then the fibre it hung over head to just below our gutter on our house, down our wall to our CSP Box and then into our house.

So everything is underground apart from the drop wire from the pole to our home.

In my opiun I think the new way will end up causing more issues later on, this is due to the air gap between the modular connector and their sockets, thermal joining of the fibres I think is the better way, but thats just me.

Saying that though, I do really like the modular connectors used, but I think it will cost more when the fibre cable needs to be replaced resulting in the entire cable needing to be replaced and also requiring the engineer to access the property, where as the current way the engineer only need to blow the new fibres through and just join the fibres at the DP and CSP and not requiring access to the property.

So there is pro's and con's with both ways.

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest

Edited by PaulKirby (Fri 02-Dec-16 02:35:17)

Standard User WWWombat
(knowledge is power) Sat 03-Dec-16 00:55:44
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
I am aware of what it replaces, but if the ducting is blocked it will still need to be cleared out no matter if it used the old or new proposed method.


The point with the new method is that it is a stronger cable, and can (with the push/pull method) be pushed through some blockages ... negating the need for a dig of any sort. No need to clear the blockage that way.

I imagine some of the trials were to figure out just how often this turned out to be a saver.

In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
however the splicing of a single fibre only take a couple of mins to actually do, where as the new way the engineer has to stip off the end put the modular connector which has to be crimmped which probaly still take a couple of mins, so no speed gained there.


You might be right, I couldn't say whether it affects the total number of man-hours that the job takes.

But note that this is also the segment of the line - the drop wire - that most likely needs replacements in the future.

In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
In my opiun I think the new way will end up causing more issues later on, this is due to the air gap between the modular connector and their sockets, thermal joining of the fibres I think is the better way, but thats just me.


I think BT's chief engineers thought the same way: keep the optical budget intact at every stage. The new thinking appears to be that there is enough room for a couple of unspliced connectors in the path.

In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
more when the fibre cable needs to be replaced resulting in the entire cable needing to be replaced and also requiring the engineer to access the property, where as the current way the engineer only need to blow the new fibres through and just join the fibres at the DP and CSP and not requiring access to the property.


I imagine that if there is sufficient damage to cause problems to the blown fibre unit, then there will be enough damage to the outer blown fibre tubing too. I'd expect an engineer to replace both.

I suspect that no engineer would splice at the DP and at the CSP without wanting to do an end-end light test or a connectivity test - both of which would need access, wouldn't it?

In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
So there is pro's and con's with both ways.


No doubt about that.
Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Sat 03-Dec-16 03:35:04
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: WWWombat] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by WWWombat:
In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
I am aware of what it replaces, but if the ducting is blocked it will still need to be cleared out no matter if it used the old or new proposed method.


The point with the new method is that it is a stronger cable, and can (with the push/pull method) be pushed through some blockages ... negating the need for a dig of any sort. No need to clear the blockage that way.

I imagine some of the trials were to figure out just how often this turned out to be a saver.

Well the cables that go through the ducts between chambers are the big strong cables with loads of fibres already in it, ours had 96 odd fibres and that cable was very stiff, so that would get through anything.

Now from the chamber where the DP is to the home, that might be a different case if that is required to be installed to the building via underground ducts.
So in that case I agree.

In reply to a post by WWWombat:
In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
however the splicing of a single fibre only take a couple of mins to actually do, where as the new way the engineer has to stip off the end put the modular connector which has to be crimmped which probaly still take a couple of mins, so no speed gained there.


You might be right, I couldn't say whether it affects the total number of man-hours that the job takes.

But note that this is also the segment of the line - the drop wire - that most likely needs replacements in the future.

True

In reply to a post by WWWombat:
In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
In my opiun I think the new way will end up causing more issues later on, this is due to the air gap between the modular connector and their sockets, thermal joining of the fibres I think is the better way, but thats just me.


I think BT's chief engineers thought the same way: keep the optical budget intact at every stage. The new thinking appears to be that there is enough room for a couple of unspliced connectors in the path.

You would think this, but we are talking about BT here.
But what I was getting at was the fact that an air gap would be fine and would work, but bad air or even dampness could get into the the actual air gap and then make things worse.

In reply to a post by WWWombat:
In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
more when the fibre cable needs to be replaced resulting in the entire cable needing to be replaced and also requiring the engineer to access the property, where as the current way the engineer only need to blow the new fibres through and just join the fibres at the DP and CSP and not requiring access to the property.


I imagine that if there is sufficient damage to cause problems to the blown fibre unit, then there will be enough damage to the outer blown fibre tubing too. I'd expect an engineer to replace both.

Well the current way if there is a break in the drop wire or if it was damaged then the engineer would only require to replace from the DP to the CSP.
This is unless the damaged part was after the CSP Box but still outside the building, then yes they would need to gain the building to replace that part of the cable.

In reply to a post by WWWombat:
I suspect that no engineer would splice at the DP and at the CSP without wanting to do an end-end light test or a connectivity test - both of which would need access, wouldn't it?

Erm, no, I don't think they would need to access the building, they could do checks / tests remotly, and if it fails the tests then they need to access the internal hardware.

But to save time I guess they might just say they need access to the internal equipment even when they might not.

In reply to a post by WWWombat:
In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
So there is pro's and con's with both ways.

No doubt about that.

We will just have to wait and see I guess.

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest
Standard User WWWombat
(knowledge is power) Mon 05-Dec-16 12:52:53
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by PaulKirby:
Well the cables that go through the ducts between chambers are the big strong cables with loads of fibres already in it, ours had 96 odd fibres and that cable was very stiff, so that would get through anything.


One aspect I don't know: How often would the larger cables, 96+ fibre, be put into a duct directly? And how often would sub-duct be put into the original duct, and then the 96+ fibre be blown down that? I guess solving a blockage needs two different methods for these.

But perhaps the difference is that the cable going from the connection block/secondary splitter back to the primary splitter can be both small and stiff. Maybe the benefit comes from size as much as strength. Some of the stories on here are about the use of smaller and smaller cables.

I could see that being a benefit in FoD, where connection blocks will be few and far apart - with little need for 96-fibre cables in the short term.
Standard User PaulKirby
(fountain of knowledge) Tue 06-Dec-16 03:07:24
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: WWWombat] [link to this post]
 
Oh right.
I know our fibre cables from our splitter node being daisy chained through all the DP's was all replaced with a 96 core cable that already had the fibres in the actual cable, I was talking to the engineers when they was replacing it, each cable was an extra metre feet or two either end and the next day a splicer guy came and connected it all up.
If I recall he spliced off about 10 or so fibres and spliced through the rest to the next cable and so on.

I have a piece of that cable here somewhere, its about half a foot long, I nabbed it when they was cleaning up their mess, might take some time finding it due to it was 17 months ago, but each of the 96 fibres was what looks to be glued in the tube.

As for why they used the 96 cores, I was told by the engineers it was the only cable they had.

Picture of the drum here, TBH I thought it was just the tubing, but when I asked them if they was going to blow the fibres down the tubing they said there is no need the fibres are already in the cable where one of the engineers showed me a piece.

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 - 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up)
TBB Speedtest

Edited by PaulKirby (Tue 06-Dec-16 03:09:53)

Standard User RickyTerzis
(newbie) Thu 03-Aug-17 18:39:40
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
Hi...i am a new user here. Are you referring to the cable from the CSP to the ONT?If so its a pre-made cable that is fed from inside the home and out through the drilled hole in the wall and then cut to length and spliced to the main drop / blown fibre cable.
Standard User PaulKirby
(knowledge is power) Fri 04-Aug-17 13:13:16
Print Post

Re: Openreach Connectorised FTTP video


[re: RickyTerzis] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by RickyTerzis:
Hi...i am a new user here. Are you referring to the cable from the CSP to the ONT?If so its a pre-made cable that is fed from inside the home and out through the drilled hole in the wall and then cut to length and spliced to the main drop / blown fibre cable.

No, I was referring to the fibre cable that was used to link the Splitter Node and the FibreDP hardware.

The black drop cable that has a blown fibre cable consisting of 4 very smaller fibres in it goes between the FibreDP and the CSP via the Fibre Manifold.

Yes there is a premade white cable with a connector one end which goes into the ONT, the other end goes through the drilled hole in the wall which the premade cable is cut to length and joint to the (I think blue fibre strand) in the CSP.

Paul

BTBroadband - Infinity 4 310Mbps (down), 31Mbps (up) FVA
TBB Speedtest | BQM #4 Linksys WRT 3200 ACM
Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | (show all)   Print Thread

Jump to