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Standard User arronlowley
(regular) Mon 27-Feb-17 20:44:18
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new mk4 faceplate


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has anyone got a new mk4 faceplate and a new master socket? if so has it impacted your speed at all and given it a bump?
Standard User MrDiode
(learned) Mon 27-Feb-17 23:08:34
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Re: new mk4 faceplate


[re: arronlowley] [link to this post]
 
yes have the new NTE5C + mk4 it has improved the upstream errored seconds that's all I can see just a slight increase in upstream and slight decrease on the downstream that's about it
Standard User PhilipD
(experienced) Tue 28-Feb-17 08:34:39
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Re: new mk4 faceplate


[re: arronlowley] [link to this post]
 
Hi

Yes, made no difference at all in my case. Plus it is obviously much more cheaply made than the previous master socket although the VDSL faceplate seems much the same in terms of the build quality the master socket doesn't. They don't even solder the components together in the master socket, they are just pushed into holes in a cheap base metal.

It's basically made as cheaply as possible, I wouldn't seek one out. Newer isn't always better.

See the tear down https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jD67a-ZC7VY

Regards

Phil

Edited by PhilipD (Tue 28-Feb-17 08:36:38)


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Standard User ChannelZ
(newbie) Tue 28-Feb-17 15:56:08
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Re: new mk4 faceplate


[re: PhilipD] [link to this post]
 
Agreed, I have a Mk3 at home, and got a Mk4 for the MIL's recently installed FTTC, and the Mk4 is total junk. Replacing a circa-1985 master socket and elcheapo filter with the Mk4 made no difference.
Standard User arronlowley
(member) Tue 28-Feb-17 17:25:44
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Re: new mk4 faceplate


[re: arronlowley] [link to this post]
 
thanks for the responses guys, il keep the mk3 then.
Standard User jabuzzard
(newbie) Tue 28-Feb-17 17:40:44
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Re: new mk4 faceplate


[re: arronlowley] [link to this post]
 
What a piece of cheap junk. What would have made more sense to me at least is have ditched the faceplate filter and have the socket present the ADSL and phone with connections for hardwiring. resulting in something that is standard depth for something screwed into a backbox.

I guess at least the type 4 is slimmer than the monstrosity that is the previous interstitial filter.
Standard User PaulKirby
(knowledge is power) Wed 01-Mar-17 04:19:54
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Re: new mk4 faceplate


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
I think they went that route due to it would be cheaper to make and also due to lower the resistance between all the contacts.

Going by all the videos I have seen those metal parts are about 0.5mm (i.e. 500um) thick whereas the thickness of copper on most circuit boards are either 35um or 70um thick.

But overall I think this might be a bad move of BT going this route, I say this due to all the components are held in by plastic and there is no solder joints at all.

TBH I would of combined all of the faceplates into the one faceplate, that way BT would of saved money by having them made in bulk.

Paul

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Standard User eckiedoo
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 01-Mar-17 07:27:23
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Re: new mk4 faceplate


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
Those component connections are basically IDC (without the "I" = Insulation), similar in concept to the multitude of wiring connections of recent decades, both the IDCs connecting the D-Line in and any on-going wiring within the various NTEs of recent years; and also the so-called "gel crimps".

I suspect the metal may be steel, so as to press or cut in to the component wire, so the conductivity may be worse than the copper on the earlier PCB versions.

However, probably like most, I would prefer to see those component connections soldered.
Standard User PhilipD
(experienced) Wed 01-Mar-17 07:58:01
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Re: new mk4 faceplate


[re: PaulKirby] [link to this post]
 
Hi

The resistance thing isn't the reason for the wide metal tracks. The signal has traveled hundreds of metres in thin copper wire, will travel through normal sized tracks on the VDSL filter and through very fine wires on the common mode filter, a cm or 2 of oversized metal tracks makes zero difference to anything. The tracks don't carry any current to speak off anyway so large tracks are not required. What do you think they are using inside a VDSL modem to carry the signal?

The tracks are that wide because it's a cheap base metal and it needs some rigidity to allow it be machined and stamped and inserted into the cheap plastic box.

Regards

Phil
Standard User eckiedoo
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 01-Mar-17 10:55:32
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Re: new mk4 faceplate


[re: PhilipD] [link to this post]
 
Agreed generally; and the greater widths will reduce the distorting effects of punching from sheet.

-----------

The slight roughness observable on the cut edges of punched or guillotined sheet metal, will also help retain the component wires, as well as removing any dirt thus making a very good joint.

Many years back, I designed and had manufactured a pre-forming machine for early semi-conductor diodes, OA81s, that incidentally and unintentionally had a similar roughening and cleaning effect on their cadmium-plated steel wires.

Apart from bending and cutting the wires to length as part of a single operation, it finished with forming a small "v-crimp" in each of the wires, which slightly roughened the bends particularly.

That roughness in turn, scrape-cleaned the thru-plated holes in the PCBs, so that subsequent soldering was much more successful.

Prior to that, there could be diode losses of 60% to 80% in extreme cases.

After the introduction of the machine, these reduced to less than 1%.

As many of the PCBs used up to 100 diodes, the cost reduction achieved was large.
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