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Standard User mrpaperclip
(newbie) Fri 03-Aug-12 20:16:42
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Why Mbps?


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Why do speeds still get quoted in bits per second? Its like saying my car does 193,121,280 mm per hour..... or 193 Mmmph
Standard User BatBoy
(legend) Fri 03-Aug-12 20:29:27
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Re: Why Mbps?


[re: mrpaperclip] [link to this post]
 
Because those are the units for data transmission speeds. Car speeds are expressed in mph.


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Anonymous
(Unregistered)Fri 03-Aug-12 20:35:43
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Re: Why Mbps?


[re: mrpaperclip] [link to this post]
 
Its like saying my car does 193,121,280 mm per hour..... or 193 Mmmph

What's wrong with kilometres per hour or as more commonly used in the UK miles per hour?

Mbps is OK for me as my long line rarely gets above 3meg shunted down it from the exchange, so why not Mbps? smile

Harry


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Standard User camieabz
(sensei) Fri 03-Aug-12 20:40:33
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Re: Why Mbps?


[re: mrpaperclip] [link to this post]
 
Until we get above Gbps as standard, Mbps will have to suffice.

~ Camieabz ~

All Connection Data ~ Some plusnet links

mod'er·a'tion n.
Synonyms: temperance, restraint, modesty.
Moderator billford
(moderator) Fri 03-Aug-12 20:44:23
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Re: Why Mbps?


[re: mrpaperclip] [link to this post]
 
It's always been done that way, mainly because there's no ambiguity- a bit is a bit.

These days it wouldn't be unreasonable to use megabytes/second on the basis that there are 8 bits in a byte, but it was not always thus.

Back in the day a byte could be anything from 4 to 8 bits depending on the system. Wiki has some history of the term.

Bill
bill@thinkbroadband.com __________________Planes and Boats and ... __________________BQM
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband moderator but it does not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User DrBC
(newbie) Fri 03-Aug-12 20:49:41
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Re: Why Mbps?


[re: mrpaperclip] [link to this post]
 
It's just they way things have always been done. The speeds of serial data transmission systems are traditionally quoted in bits per second. SATA and USB are the most common examples.
Standard User BatBoy
(legend) Fri 03-Aug-12 21:35:33
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Re: Why Mbps?


[re: mrpaperclip] [link to this post]
 
I notice loop lengths are in kft.


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Standard User gomezz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 03-Aug-12 21:50:07
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Re: Why Mbps?


[re: billford] [link to this post]
 
Or even nine bits which is still in current use.

O2 Standard (8Mbps LLU)
Standard User camieabz
(sensei) Fri 03-Aug-12 22:47:49
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Re: Why Mbps?


[re: billford] [link to this post]
 
If the powers that be delivered a USC of 8Mbps throughput, we could all switch to 1 Meg (abytes) speak.

I prefer Mb to MB anyway. It helps to differentiate between data transfer and data storage.

~ Camieabz ~

All Connection Data ~ Some plusnet links

mod'er·a'tion n.
Synonyms: temperance, restraint, modesty.
Standard User XRaySpeX
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sat 04-Aug-12 00:14:46
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Re: Why Mbps?


[re: mrpaperclip] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by mrpaperclip:
Why do speeds still get quoted in bits per second?
Cuz the transmission is in bits. Not all the bits that are transmitted are actual data that you would see on your PC; some are protocol overheads (say about 17%), like the addresses of the sender and destination.

So when you download a file to your PC and you see it measured in Bytes, more bits than 8 x its Byte size were transferred to you over ADSL and the Net, and those bits have to fit within your Bandwidth (i.e. Sync Speed).

1999: Freeserve 48K Dial-Up => 2005: Wanadoo 1 Meg BB => 2007: Orange 2 Meg BB => 2008: Orange 8 Meg LLU => 2010: Orange 16 Meg LLU => 2011: Orange 19 Meg WBC
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