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Standard User Chrysalis
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 17-Jan-13 12:37:18
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how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[link to this post]
 
If I am not mistaken ofcom is setup to only accept input either from government or service providers, the general public have access to the website in that they follow a wizard which tries hard to discourage them from filling in a form and even then you can only fill it in for a complaint (not to provide feedback on regulation) and also limited to 1500 characters meaning no comment can be detailed.

am I missing something? is ofcom really setup to not have the public contribute to policy.

I am aware of postal and phone submission I am talking about online electronic submission.

BT Infinity 2 Since Dec 2012 - Estimate 65.9/20 - Attainable peak 110/36 - Current Sync 71/20

Edited by Chrysalis (Thu 17-Jan-13 12:38:24)

Standard User Ignitionnet
(knowledge is power) Thu 17-Jan-13 12:55:46
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Re: how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[re: Chrysalis] [link to this post]
 
In my experience the best way is to speak with people who work with Ofcom, get their more informed point of view and offer your own where you've something to add.

Their submissions as direct stakeholders carry way more impact than a random member of the public. Those of us who don't work in such things really don't have much idea what we're talking about as far as regulatory environments go and can only offer generally uneducated opinions.

Are you thinking of commenting on the issues Dido Harding has mentioned?

Actually while I'm thinking about it Ofcom solicit opinions via consultations. If you want to comment on policy it might be worth speaking with your MP. Politicians write the laws Ofcom's decisions implement.

Edited by Ignitionnet (Thu 17-Jan-13 13:02:05)

Standard User Chrysalis
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 17-Jan-13 13:43:14
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Re: how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[re: Ignitionnet] [link to this post]
 
ok thanks.

the comments by Dido Harding actually were part of it yes, it was a more detailed input but the reducing costs of wholesale was part of which I was objecting to with reasons why.

there was other inputs as well related to min length of contract from openreach and their lack of obligation to loss of performance over the duration of a contract. eg. someone could have estimated speeds of over 60mbit, a day 1 sync of 80mbit and 2 months later be on 20mbit and would not be able to do anything about is as thats within the spervice spec sold by openreach and now under a long contract as well, the MSR been removed in FTTC services.

BT Infinity 2 Since Dec 2012 - Estimate 65.9/20 - Attainable peak 110/36 - Current Sync 71/20

Edited by Chrysalis (Thu 17-Jan-13 13:43:46)


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Standard User yarwell
(sensei) Fri 18-Jan-13 10:22:39
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Re: how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[re: Chrysalis] [link to this post]
 
am I missing something?
Yes. Their consultations are open to anyone.

http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/consultations/how-w...

--

Phil

MaxDSL - goes as fast as it can and doesn't read the line checker first.

MaxDSL diagnostics
Standard User yarwell
(sensei) Fri 18-Jan-13 10:35:44
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Re: how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[re: Chrysalis] [link to this post]
 
the MSR been removed in FTTC services


there is a criteria for speed reduction from the initial trained rate to be a fault.....

"What if I need to raise a fault on an 80/20 line?
We are changing the test thresholds within our GEA service test that we use to accept faults. From 19th March 2012 there will be no need to wait until your line speed has dropped below a specific fault threshold rate. Openreach provides a full fault diagnostic process that picks up the major causes of speed issues. Any found on an end user’s line will be picked up by our test systems and we’ll accept a fault for investigation. For further details see Section 3.9 of the GEA over FTTC product description."

--

Phil

MaxDSL - goes as fast as it can and doesn't read the line checker first.

MaxDSL diagnostics
Standard User yarwell
(sensei) Fri 18-Jan-13 10:40:31
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Re: how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[re: yarwell] [link to this post]
 
found it....

For services initially synching up at 15 Mbit/s or above, if the service falls below 15 Mbit/s at any other time then a fault may be reported to BTW which will be investigated. Additionally,if the line rate drops by more than 25% over a 14 day continuous period then a fault can be reported to BTW.

For services initially synching at downstream speeds below 15 Mbit/s but above 5 Mbit/s, if
the service falls below 5 Mbit/s at any other time a fault may be reported to BTW which will
be investigated


--

Phil

MaxDSL - goes as fast as it can and doesn't read the line checker first.

MaxDSL diagnostics
Standard User Chrysalis
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 18-Jan-13 10:42:33
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Re: how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[re: yarwell] [link to this post]
 
I still want to consult with them, it seems from the options given to me I need to wait for the next consultation whenever that may be.

thank you for those quotes tho as there was a couple of things I wasnt previously aware off.

BT Infinity 2 Since Dec 2012 - Estimate 65.9/20 - Attainable peak 110/36 - Current Sync 71/20
Standard User yarwell
(sensei) Fri 18-Jan-13 10:48:47
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Re: how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[re: Chrysalis] [link to this post]
 
http://www.ofcom.org.uk/contact-us/ you could write to them smile

Consultations are the best way to influence policy, or making an input when they do a review of a market sector etc.

You have time to respond to their proposed Work plan, for example, at https://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/consultations/draf...

--

Phil

MaxDSL - goes as fast as it can and doesn't read the line checker first.

MaxDSL diagnostics
Standard User Ignitionnet
(knowledge is power) Fri 18-Jan-13 11:38:22
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Re: how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[re: Chrysalis] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Chrysalis:
it was a more detailed input but the reducing costs of wholesale was part of which I was objecting to with reasons why.

there was other inputs as well related to min length of contract from openreach and their lack of obligation to loss of performance over the duration of a contract. eg. someone could have estimated speeds of over 60mbit, a day 1 sync of 80mbit and 2 months later be on 20mbit and would not be able to do anything about is as thats within the spervice spec sold by openreach and now under a long contract as well, the MSR been removed in FTTC services.


This would purely be cathartic for you, you won't get anywhere especially on the wholesale costs. Those are following Ofcom directions and the time for consultancy is long gone.

Contractual periods likewise conform to Ofcom's rules and regulations, the MSR issue has been discussed elsewhere.
Standard User RobertoS
(sensei) Fri 18-Jan-13 13:04:17
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Re: how do ofcom take considerations on policy?


[re: yarwell] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by yarwell:
For services initially synching up at 15 Mbit/s or above, if the service falls below 15 Mbit/s at any other time then a fault may be reported to BTW which will be investigated. Additionally,if the line rate drops by more than 25% over a 14 day continuous period then a fault can be reported to BTW.

For services initially synching at downstream speeds below 15 Mbit/s but above 5 Mbit/s, if
the service falls below 5 Mbit/s at any other time a fault may be reported to BTW which will
be investigated
That appears to be a BT Wholesale limit.

And I suspect the wording, particularly "over".

Grammatically that means it can drop by 20% between the start and end of each of two or even more consecutive 14-day periods. (Whether that be by 40% or 36% of the original doesn't matter for the point I am making). So giving a huge drop from the original.

Whereas the wording "for a 14-day continuous period", which in everyday-speak is synonymous with the above, grammatically has a completely different meaning, which in my opinion will be what the writer intended. Writing spoken English is a road to disaster in terms of clarity of meaning.

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