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Standard User gromit69
(member) Tue 14-Apr-15 13:54:34
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Stopping the hogging...


[link to this post]
 
Picture the scene - you drop a reasonably large file into cloud storage app (One Drive in this case) and it starts to sync. However, because it's maxing out the upload link, everything else grinds to a halt.
Back in the day I used to run a linux based router, and I used to prioritize ACK packets so that the rest of the connection had a better chance of working as normal.
I'm running a BiPac 7800N now, and whilst it appears do do QOS, it's a little more basic than being able to prioritize specific types of packet.
Is it just me who has this problem? And is there a way to control it at a network level? Are newer routers better at this? Does is disappear with fibre (I'm on ADSL 2+ at the moment)?
Many thanks!
Standard User Oliver341
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Tue 14-Apr-15 15:24:04
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Re: Stopping the hogging...


[re: gromit69] [link to this post]
 
I'm of the opinion that clients which have a lot of uploading to do should always have the ability to cap the upload speed (e.g. Filezilla).

That said, I have an HG533 router (which is relatively sophisticated for an ISP-supplied router), and when clients are copying large files across the LAN via Robocopy, internet access for clients is practically lost. I suppose the router should handle this situation more gracefully.

That said, the router does have QoS, but I haven't got around to figuring out what these settings actually do:

http://s15.postimg.org/ypgwrofbv/qos1.png
http://s18.postimg.org/u5paanzyx/qos2.png

Oliver.
Standard User gromit69
(member) Tue 14-Apr-15 15:40:48
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Re: Stopping the hogging...


[re: Oliver341] [link to this post]
 
Completely agree. It's why uploading via a webclient is so annoying (my other bugbear!). Dropbox has a throttle, so I don't see why Onedrive shouldn't. Especially for a piece of software which is supposed to work in the background!
I've just been reading up on DSCP, but I've left more confused than when I started. The concept is pretty simple, but I don't understand why it's left for the user to set up when a default configuration should serve 99% of people.


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Standard User ggremlin
(committed) Tue 14-Apr-15 15:43:41
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Re: Stopping the hogging...


[re: Oliver341] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Oliver341:
I'm of the opinion that clients which have a lot of uploading to do should always have the ability to cap the upload speed (e.g. Filezilla).

That said, I have an HG533 router (which is relatively sophisticated for an ISP-supplied router), and when clients are copying large files across the LAN via Robocopy, internet access for clients is practically lost. I suppose the router should handle this situation more gracefully.

with robocopy you can specify an inter packet gap, which will give other programs a chance to use some of the bandwidth
Standard User Oliver341
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Tue 14-Apr-15 15:46:16
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Re: Stopping the hogging...


[re: gromit69] [link to this post]
 
I suppose most people will not want the hassle of setting their client's upload speed to 75% sync, and want it to just work. But there's no reason not to put the option in there, for those that want to throttle it.

Differentiated services does seem like a potential solution though, perhaps in the long term if router manufacturers decide to adopt it.

Oliver.
Standard User Oliver341
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Tue 14-Apr-15 15:48:18
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Re: Stopping the hogging...


[re: ggremlin] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by ggremlin:
with robocopy you can specify an inter packet gap, which will give other programs a chance to use some of the bandwidth

That sounds useful. I saw the definition "Specifies the inter-packet gap to free bandwidth on slow lines" which I thought would not be applicable to 100 mbit LAN, but I will certainly give it a go.

Oliver.
Standard User micksharpe
(legend) Tue 14-Apr-15 16:44:38
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Re: Stopping the hogging...


[re: gromit69] [link to this post]
 
Make sure that your TCP/IP settings are optimised, especially the MTU size. You can do it manually or you can use a utility such as TCP Optimizer. Packet fragmentation will be more noticeable on uploads because of the lower bandwidth available.

Faced with the choice between changing ones mind and proving that there is no need to do so,
almost everyone gets busy on the proof. -- J.K. Galbraith

Edited by micksharpe (Tue 14-Apr-15 16:46:07)

Standard User BatBoy
(sensei) Tue 14-Apr-15 17:06:35
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Re: Stopping the hogging...


[re: Oliver341] [link to this post]
 
Good to see the Help page gives a good insight to the settings. Also, I note all those users with an unlocked HG612 have a QOS-enabled modem smile


____________________________________________________________________________Information_without_perspective_is_a_higher_form_of_ignorance________
Standard User Oliver341
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Tue 14-Apr-15 17:26:14
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Re: Stopping the hogging...


[re: BatBoy] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by BatBoy:
Good to see the Help page gives a good insight to the settings. Also, I note all those users with an unlocked HG612 have a QOS-enabled modem smile

Have you looked into configuring QoS on Huawei's? I've had a read of help tabs, but I'm unclear if these settings can control traffic priority per protocol per device, or are simply intended to manage traffic per device (i.e. de-prioritising all traffic from a specific device on the LAN).

Oliver.
Standard User BatBoy
(sensei) Tue 14-Apr-15 17:33:20
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Re: Stopping the hogging...


[re: Oliver341] [link to this post]
 
Let the dog see the rabbit
QoS

When the bandwidth is limited, through the QoS function, the gateway can allocate all the bandwidth to a certain application, increase the priority of the application.
Global Settings

On this page, you need to set certain global parameters of the QoS. The parameters are described as follows:

Enable: It is used to specify whether to enable the QoS function.

Bandwidth: It is used to specify the bandwidth used for the QoS.

Queue type: It is used to select a policy used for the QoS. The available types are described as follows:

PQ: If you set Queue type to PQ, four queues are listed based on the priorities. The priority is classified into the highest priority, high priority, medium priority, and low priority. The gateway first schedules the queue with a higher priority. If the queue with a higher priority has a packet cache, the queue with a lower priority cannot be scheduled.
WFQ: If you set Queue type to WFQ, four queues are listed. You can set the weight of the bandwidth occupied by each queue. The bandwidth is allocated to each queue based on the corresponding weight.
WFQ,PQ: If you set Queue type to WFQ,PQ, fore queues are listed. The first queue has the highest priority, The other queues scheduled by WFQ.

Note: The templates have certain preset classification rules. After you select a template, you can modify the parameter settings of the template.

Queue: The parameters of the queue vary with queue types. You need to set the queue type in the global settings, and then set the corresponding queue parameters. For each queue type, all the queues can be enabled or disabled separately.

Policer: You can limit the rate of stream though configing the policer parameters.
Traffic Classification

On this page, you can manage the traffic classification rules on the basis of the QoS settings. The parameters are described as follows:

Rule name: It is used to specify the name of the current rule.

Enable: It is used to specify whether to enable the current rule.

Source MAC : They are used to specify the source MAC addresses to be classified.

Dest MAC : They are used to specify the destination MAC addresses to be classified.

Source IP and Source IP Mask: They are used to specify the source IP addresses and mask to be classified.

Dest IP and Dest IP Mask : They are used to specify the destination IP addresses and mask to be classified.

Source Port and Source Port Max: They are used to specify the range of the source ports to be classified.

Dest Port and Dest Port Max: They are used to specify the range of the destination ports to be classified.

Lan Interface: It is used to select the lan interface on which the packets are classified.

Wan Interface: It is used to select the wan interface on which the packets are classified.

DSCP : They are used to specify the DSCP to be classified.

Protocol: It is used to select the protocol used by the packets to be classified.

VLAN ID : They are used to specify the VLAN ID to be classified.

802.1p : They are used to specify the 802.1p values to be classified.

Note: After setting the preceding matching conditions, you can perform the following operations on the matched streams:

DSCP mark: It is used to add a DSCP mark to the matched stream.

802.1p mark: It is used to add a 802.1p mark to the matched stream.

Policer: It is used to select a Policer that the configured rule is to be applied. For details about how to configure the Policer, see the description about the QoS page.

Queue: It is used to select a queue that the configured rule is to be applied. For details about how to configure the queue, see the description about the QoS page.

Note: After setting the parameters, click Submit so that the rule can take effect. In addition, you can modify, delete, or disable the rules.



____________________________________________________________________________Information_without_perspective_is_a_higher_form_of_ignorance________

Edited by BatBoy (Tue 14-Apr-15 17:38:08)

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