General Discussion
  >> General Broadband Chatter


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.


Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | [3] | 4 | 5 | (show all)   Print Thread
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 30-May-18 15:40:24
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: Michael_Chare] [link to this post]
 
Ok so a public survey with 4,205 responses, if the usual rules followed it should hopefully scale to the population.

65% on the make/receive calls, but 29% say they don't have a landline.

If the 29% is correct for residential and the figures don't skew when moved to households we get

8.3 million households without a landline and 20 million households with a landline.

Based on the market data Ofcom report they say 26.6 million residential lines, which is more like 93%.

The difference may be people who have a landline but do not have a telephone at all. Unfortunately survey does not appear to make that distinction.

The suggest if the 93% and 65% are correct then is that lots of people already are happy relying on mobiles for emergency calls. So maybe targeting the emergency power support at a much smaller group i.e. vulnerable groups may be the way forward.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User alwall
(member) Wed 30-May-18 17:15:35
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: Michael_Chare] [link to this post]
 
There seems to be a huge variation in figures re the number of installed landlines.
Ofcom's own 2017 Technology Tracker (p2) suggests a figure of 82% !

https://www.ofcom.org.uk/research-and-data/multi-sec...

However, whatever the accurate figure, my concern is about resilience during widespread power outages where cellular base stations stop working after an hour or so.

Have we learnt the lessons of Lancaster? I doubt it.

If and when my landline ceases to be exchange powered, I'll be installing a back up that ensures continuity

BTBroadband
Standard User MCM
(knowledge is power) Wed 30-May-18 17:36:06
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: alwall] [link to this post]
 
What appears to be needed is more resilient backup arrangements for cellular base stations including swapping out batteries where necessary in much the same way as Openreach does with its FTTC cabs when there are local power failures.


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.

Standard User JohnR
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Wed 30-May-18 21:12:05
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: PhilipD] [link to this post]
 
I have never understood why the DECT phones do not have some form of way of maintaining a connection when power drops. As the power block should only be required to charge the battery in the phone. But I guess the manufactures think otherwise.
Personally as to power cuts, and I used to look after a vulnerable person. I always found mobiles to be better as you got far more updates via twitter or such social media. Where they can mass feed updates. Rather than attempting to keep phoning every so often.

Do we need the provision to power modems etc in the event of power cuts?
Again mobile works well, can be easily charged. So as long as there is access to the internet via mobile it's OK.

If Ofcom want these new regulations in place. Then they need to make sure that not just BT (for want of another name) but every other provider Virgin & mobile etc also have to provide exactly the same lever of backup.

\_0-0_/ AdsL is Hell \_0-0_/
To Infinity
Wats SUP doc.... You using too much.....
Standard User RobertoS
(elder) Wed 30-May-18 22:12:40
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: JohnR] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by JohnR:
I have never understood why the DECT phones do not have some form of way of maintaining a connection when power drops. As the power block should only be required to charge the battery in the phone. But I guess the manufactures think otherwise.
That would require a battery in the base station, which raises several questions.

Bearing in mind that making the connection to the line itself is not the issue, off the top of my head:

- its capacity bearing in mind the need for always-on wireless contact with a variable number of sleeping slaves;
- handling a call that could go on for well over an hour;
- similarly wrt multiple slaves on the call;
- again similarly, handling intercom calls of varying length and frequency.

My broadband basic info/help site - www.robertos.me.uk. Domains, site and mail hosting - Tsohost.
Connection - AAISP Home::1 80/20. 200GB. Sync 70370/12780Kbps @ 600m. BQMs - IPv4 & IPv6

Edited by RobertoS (Wed 30-May-18 22:15:36)

Standard User alwall
(member) Wed 30-May-18 22:33:52
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: JohnR] [link to this post]
 
The real life situation in the Lancaster power cut in 2015 was that all mobile phone coverage ceased. There is no requirement for cellular base stations to continue working during a prolonged mains failure.

Landlines continued to work but with no mains power there was no internet access as modem/routers were off.

Our infrastructure is increasingly mains-power dependent.

BTBroadband
Standard User billford
(elder) Wed 30-May-18 22:41:31
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: RobertoS] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by RobertoS:
That would require a battery in the base station, which raises several questions.
My DECT phone runs from the same UPS as the computer, router and modem tongue

In the event of a power cut I shut down the computer (and use the laptop if I need the internet), the UPS will keep everything else running for at least an hour (I haven't checked the maximum time).

If it runs out of time and there's no mobile signal I'll rummage around for the corded phone... all it takes is a bit of forward planning tongue

Bill
A level playing field is level in both directions.

_______________________________________Planes and Boats and ... ______________BQMs: IPv4 IPv6

Edited by billford (Wed 30-May-18 23:04:19)

Standard User dsergeant
(member) Thu 31-May-18 07:15:10
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: billford] [link to this post]
 
Adding a backup battery to the base would surely be the easiest option,. In my case when there is a power cut all the handsets soon run down their batteries as they are sitting there constantly searching for the missing base with the backlight turned on (I have tried to find a setting to disable the backlight but failed). But as said I can easily plug in my traditional corded phone (which of course will no longer work when everything is VOIP!).
Standard User Icaras
(experienced) Thu 31-May-18 08:36:50
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by MrSaffron:
Ok so a public survey with 4,205 responses, if the usual rules followed it should hopefully scale to the population.

65% on the make/receive calls, but 29% say they don't have a landline.

If the 29% is correct for residential and the figures don't skew when moved to households we get

8.3 million households without a landline and 20 million households with a landline.

Based on the market data Ofcom report they say 26.6 million residential lines, which is more like 93%.

The difference may be people who have a landline but do not have a telephone at all. Unfortunately survey does not appear to make that distinction.

The suggest if the 93% and 65% are correct then is that lots of people already are happy relying on mobiles for emergency calls. So maybe targeting the emergency power support at a much smaller group i.e. vulnerable groups may be the way forward.


I wouldnít trust any kind of survey about landlines. Go on the Ofcom figures. Virgin Media still usually install a landline for new customers (correct me if Iím wrong) and obviously Openreach do.

If you ask a lot of people if they have a landline theyíll say no. Even though they absolutely do. As they donít associate their broadband with a landline. You wouldnít believe the amount of people that donít know their broadband comes down a landline (people on the Openreach network I mean).

What they mean is that they donít have a phone plugged in, so to them they have no landline.

The amount of installed lines figure is the one to go off, is that the 82% figure? That feels much more accurate to me. In fact I would have thought even higher than that but clearly not.

Icaras

Edited by Icaras (Thu 31-May-18 08:39:27)

Standard User RobertoS
(elder) Thu 31-May-18 09:13:57
Print Post

Re: Ofcom consults on changes for access to emergency servic


[re: Icaras] [link to this post]
 
Around here many people on VM, (ex-NTL and originally Nynex), say they donít have a landline because their phone is through Virgin Cable. They automatically assume landline=BT, sometimes not even Openreach.

As you say, these surveys are often highly suspect.

The increasingly high number of none-installed could very well be down to bed-sitters and short-term flat-dwellers, particularly in London and to some extent other major cities.

My broadband basic info/help site - www.robertos.me.uk. Domains, site and mail hosting - Tsohost.
Connection - AAISP Home::1 80/20. 200GB. Sync 70370/12780Kbps @ 600m. BQMs - IPv4 & IPv6
Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | [3] | 4 | 5 | (show all)   Print Thread

Jump to