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Standard User majika2007
(learned) Wed 15-May-13 21:40:27
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Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


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Hi,

I would like some advise on the best solutions or most practical info for a Wired home network setup from my Modem > router > Workstation/Server. Also from router > IPTV/Bluray Live player both devices support PoE standards

I am having FTTC-based Fibre installed shortly, and am thinking of running my home network (primarily) to my server/workstation using a wired Ethernet solution: 7m Cat6a Shielded Patch - Grey.

The router will be the Technicolor TG582n.

I am unsure exactly which modem I will be getting just yet, however it will be either the Huawei HG622 / ECI B-FOCuS V-2FUb/I Rev.1B (<-maybe different firmware)

As much details as possible please, Anything and everything, tips/tricks.. smile

Are there any other considerations regarding the capability's of the Ethernet cables like the resistances over distance/solid cores vs UTP / Which types of EFI shielding is best for busy home environment.
Plus things like the frequency's which ADSL will be running over whilst inside/past my NTE inside my home network will this be dependant upon my Ethernet choices.

Anyway, As for the Technicolor TG582n router:
- LAN1 (WAN) Port - Goes from the Modem to the Router (hopefully <5m distance apart)
I will maybe changing the standard Ethernet cable which comes free with the Modem over into a 5m Shielded Cat5E Snagless Patch Cable - Grey version.
- LAN2 Port I am thinking of running a 7m Cat6a Shielded Patch - Grey. over a small run of about <10m to my Server/Workstation
- LAN3 Port Its gong to be going straight into the back of an 50" HD IPTV ( =< 2m away from router)
- LAN4 Port Its gong to be going straight into the back of an Toshiba Blu-ray Live player ( <=<2m away from router)


Can you give me some advise if the type of Ethernet cable is overkill, for the LAN2 Port run to the serve/workstation as I am trying to future-proof my Network setup as much as possible (Hopefully for when XE-PON arrives in the future) smile and I will not have to keep messing with threading Network cables through walls, etc.

My Primary system's On-board LAN port is: 1 x Realtek RTL8111E chip (10/100/1000 Mbit) however this can be upgraded in the future to another NIC.

I would love to hear about the best way I should go about this type of home network setup or if I am missing something out.

And also, would it be best to buy the Ethernet cable pre-assembled, as in, set lengths 10m/20m and cut them down to size or should I do everything myself, like buy a 15m Cat6a and a separate 20m Cat5e length and then do the cutting/fitting the RJ45 headers/boots/crimping, etc?

Thanks

Plusnet Waiting for FTTC Install smile
Standard User IanBB
(member) Wed 15-May-13 21:53:08
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Re: Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


[re: majika2007] [link to this post]
 
If you want a future proof home network you should really consider a gigabit router.
Standard User prlzx
(experienced) Wed 15-May-13 22:11:54
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Re: Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


[re: IanBB] [link to this post]
 
Well, I'd say as long as there is gigabit on the switch ports (and wireless access points when needed), the router does not need to be gigabit until the internet connection needs it.

The convention with a separate switch is to wire all LAN devices into the switch, rule of thumb to ensure you have some spare capacity in terms of unused switch ports (I'd say roughly 25%).

A single connection from there to the LAN of the router (and basically ignore the built-in switch on the router in this case) though if you need a DMZ there are variations on this.

It also means elements of the network can be upgraded independently as needed. You can get gigabit switches with a few 10GE ports when the time comes for a 10GE capable server, but perhaps not cost effective yet.



prompt $P - Invalid drive specification - Abort, Retry, Fail? $G
prlzx on iDNET: ADSL2+ / 21CN at ~4Mbps / 700kbps with IP4/6

Edited by prlzx (Wed 15-May-13 22:19:22)


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Standard User IanBB
(member) Wed 15-May-13 22:24:46
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Re: Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


[re: prlzx] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by prlzx:
Well, I'd say as long as there is gigabit on the switch ports (and wireless access points when needed), the router does not need to be gigabit until the internet connection needs it.


Unless I'm missing something blindingly obvious here I don't see a separate switch mentioned.

The only switch I see is part of the router and it is only 10/100.
Standard User RobertoS
(sensei) Wed 15-May-13 23:18:45
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Re: Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


[re: majika2007] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by majika2007:
I am unsure exactly which modem I will be getting just yet, however it will be either the Huawei HG622 / ECI B-FOCuS V-2FUb/I Rev.1B (<-maybe different firmware)Anyway, As for the Technicolor TG582n router:
That sounds like you are talking about the two Openreach modems supplied. The Huawei is an HG612. The HG622 is a 4-port version that a few of us have obtained, flashed with asbokid firmware, for use as a modem/router. Currently he is sold out of them.

As a very minor point, the Plusnet 582n has LAN4 operating as the WAN port, not LAN1.

My broadband basic info/help site - www.robertos.me.uk | Domains,website and mail hosting - Tsohost.
Connection - Plusnet UnLim Fibre (FTTC). Sync ~ 54.2/15.2Mbps @ 600m. - BQM

"Where talent is a dwarf, self-esteem is a giant." - Jean-Antoine Petit-Senn.
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Allergy information: This post was manufactured in an environment where nuts are present. It may include traces of understatement, litotes and humour.
Standard User majika2007
(learned) Thu 16-May-13 00:02:16
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Re: Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


[re: RobertoS] [link to this post]
 
OK already looking at the ASUS RT-AC66U RT-AC66U Wireless Dual-Band AC-1750 Router


Then I will make enquiry's into looking to the Huawei HG622 and possibly acquiring one for myself smile

In reply to a post by RobertoS:
That sounds like you are talking about the two Openreach modems supplied. The Huawei is an HG612. The HG622 is a 4-port version that a few of us have obtained, flashed with asbokid firmware, for use as a modem/router. Currently he is sold out of them.


My mistake regarding the Openreach modems.
First I will have to wait to see which I will be supplied with Huawei/ECI.
If I can hold of the HG622 does that mean I will not need a separate modem and router (all-in-one job)

Plusnet Waiting for FTTC Install smile

Edited by majika2007 (Thu 16-May-13 00:14:33)

Standard User ukhardy07
(fountain of knowledge) Thu 16-May-13 01:50:04
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Re: Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


[re: majika2007] [link to this post]
 
I have a 50p 10m ethernet cable that does gigabit fine. Just for reference.
Standard User prlzx
(experienced) Thu 16-May-13 02:09:28
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Re: Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


[re: IanBB] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by IanBB:
Unless I'm missing something blindingly obvious here I don't see a separate switch mentioned.
The only switch I see is part of the router and it is only 10/100.

Yes the OP asks for advice on future-proofing a wired network, "anything and everything".
This is an open-ended question that includes anything the OP hasn't thought of (yet).

My advice stands - if you want a future-proof wired network you put in a switch for all the local stuff so that your LAN traffic is switched at full speed and prices of gigabit switches are low enough now
(5-port = under £15 and 8-port = under £25 unless you need smart/managed).

The main purpose of a router is to connect your LAN to other network(s) - in this case the internet. It doesn't matter if the router only has 10/100 ports until the internet connection is faster than the 80 of FTTC.

Consumer 4-port routers typically contain a CPU doing routing along with a 10/100 switch chip (5 or 6 interfaces as one usually goes to the CPU and another if there is an ethernet WAN port; internally they may use VLANs to keep the WAN separate).

But you can end up paying over the odds just to get gigabit ports on that. And often the CPU is not capable of actually routing at gigabit speeds (check LAN to WAN throughput in reviews as some can max out at as little as 50M regardless of whether the ports are gigabit).

But let the router stick to doing routing, as connecting a 10/100 router to the gigabit switch will not slow down the LAN in any way and is better when it comes time to upgrade things.

Similarly if the OP adds wireless in the future they can choose b/g/n or a/b/g/n or a/b/g/n/ac according to desired speed/compatibility/budget and connect that to the switch also.



prompt $P - Invalid drive specification - Abort, Retry, Fail? $G
prlzx on iDNET: ADSL2+ / 21CN at ~4Mbps / 700kbps with IP4/6

Edited by prlzx (Thu 16-May-13 02:13:32)

Standard User prlzx
(experienced) Thu 16-May-13 02:42:14
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Re: Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


[re: prlzx] [link to this post]
 
btw this is an example of a more serious router for future-proofing.

Those 3 ports are independent VLAN-capable interfaces (rather than a switch chip) so SOHO, DMZ and Guest LAN type setups are all possible. It is Vyatta / Debian under the bonnet - meaning if you really want to you can add packages (apt-get).

The KB has some ready made configurations as templates and a for getting started.



prompt $P - Invalid drive specification - Abort, Retry, Fail? $G
prlzx on iDNET: ADSL2+ / 21CN at ~4Mbps / 700kbps with IP4/6
Standard User ukhardy07
(fountain of knowledge) Thu 16-May-13 03:11:20
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Re: Advise of futre-proof Home wired network


[re: majika2007] [link to this post]
 
Very nice router however with these routers that quite really high wireless speeds you often find the range really suffers.

They get high throughput by using channel bonding on wireless which I find always causes range issues.

You would be far better to get a cheaper N600 router and have 2 of them - say one at each end of the house - than getting 1 really expensive router which struggles to cover the whole area.

If you just get 1 router, the poorer signal areas might only pull sub 5 - 10Mbps speeds wirelessly.

Having a strong signal all over will ensure good speeds all over. N600 can handle over 100Mbps real world throughput on wireless with good signal.

Anything more complex wirelessly (say you were coving a very large property) I would look at something professional such as aruba networks as it's easier to maintain it. I doubt you fit into this category though.

Edited by ukhardy07 (Thu 16-May-13 03:18:25)

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