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Standard User sultanoflondon
(newbie) Sat 07-Feb-15 11:19:42
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Improving wireless connection around my house


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Hi all,

I have a house in which the TalkTalk router does not manage to adequately serve all areas of the house with a good steady connection. It is very strange because when I have a connection, it's great and I can stream 720p YouTube no problem at all. But when it's bad, I can't even open up a webpage. It drops out a lot!

Is it possible for me to configure TWO internet routers that will transmit a Wi-Fi connection on two different SSIDs and two different networks, but use the same telephone line?

I have tried power line adaptors: they never work across electrical circuit breakers and the peripheral areas of the house that have bad coverage are on different electrical circuits than the one the router is on.

I can't move the router for complicated reasons for the TalkTalk internet-based TV service we have, but trust me, that would not be an option.

Neither can I change the router to a more powerful one because of the same complicated reasons for the TalkTalk internet-based TV service.

All devices that use the internet on the router are using a Wi-Fi connection.

Any help is appreciated! Thanks very much!
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Sat 07-Feb-15 14:42:47
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Re: Improving wireless connection around my house


[re: sultanoflondon] [link to this post]
 
Only one router connected to the ADSL line or VDSL line itself, but you can add a secondary wireless access point running from a piece of Ethernet LAN cable to improve the weak spots in coverage.

e.g. TP Link 300 Mbps Access Point for £35.99

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User sultanoflondon
(newbie) Sat 07-Feb-15 14:47:48
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Re: Improving wireless connection around my house


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by MrSaffron:
Only one router connected to the ADSL line or VDSL line itself, but you can add a secondary wireless access point running from a piece of Ethernet LAN cable to improve the weak spots in coverage.

e.g. TP Link 300 Mbps Access Point for £35.99


Thank you very much for that!

Does it have to have the ethernet cable running between the router and the AP? Can it be wireless?

Also, I have heard about 'bridging'...

Could this be the answer to my issue? To have a second router that is a client bridge to the primary router? (Wireless)


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Standard User sfo32
(learned) Sat 07-Feb-15 16:04:29
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Re: Improving wireless connection around my house


[re: sultanoflondon] [link to this post]
 
You can use Wireless range extenders (which may be what you mean by bridging) which need no Ethernet cable. They receive from your existing WiFi router, and retransmit.

The problem is that they cannot send and receive at the same time (or at least the affordable ones can't). The end result of this is that each range extender you use halves your maximum WiFi speed when you connect to it.

This may be OK for you, or it may not.

There are some really nifty little range extenders out there. I particularly like the BT branded ones, like the BT Dual Band WiFi Extender 600.

But it may be better to use a mains-based extender in one way or another. Essentially you use the mains cabling using special adapters to extend your wired network. You can plug a WiFi router into the remote end to extend your WiFi range without necessarily halving the speed (though don't expect massive speeds over the mains cabling in all cases).

Again BT have a wide range of products branded in their name that can help you. Take a look here: http://www.shop.bt.com/category/networking,network-d...

They have products that combine the mains extending and wifi all in one - plug one little gizmo next to your router, then you plug little WiFi extender gizmos wherever you have poor signal. BT WiFi Home Hotspot 500 does this, for example.

But BT isn't the only company that has this sort of kit, nor is the BT shop the only place you can get the BT-branded stuff. Check out Amazon where you'll see a million and one options.

Makes to search for are Devolo,, TP-link, D-Link and Netgear.
The Ethernet-over-mains technologies are known as Powerline and Homeplug

Amazon has most of the products in a "PowerLAN" category: Computers & Accessories : Networking Devices : PowerLAN Adapters.

Other things to search for would be "WiFi range extender".

Just keep in mind that mains-based products can work really badly. None of the properties I've wanted to use it in have been a success. Things like fridges, freezers, central heating and all sorts of other things can introduce a lot of noise that causes problems.
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Sat 07-Feb-15 16:52:09
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Re: Improving wireless connection around my house


[re: sultanoflondon] [link to this post]
 
The page I linked should give option for a range extender, they do work but half the speed over the wireless

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User sultanoflondon
(newbie) Sun 08-Feb-15 11:38:09
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Re: Improving wireless connection around my house


[re: sfo32] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by sfo32:
You can use Wireless range extenders (which may be what you mean by bridging) which need no Ethernet cable. They receive from your existing WiFi router, and retransmit.

The problem is that they cannot send and receive at the same time (or at least the affordable ones can't). The end result of this is that each range extender you use halves your maximum WiFi speed when you connect to it.

This may be OK for you, or it may not.

There are some really nifty little range extenders out there. I particularly like the BT branded ones, like the BT Dual Band WiFi Extender 600.

But it may be better to use a mains-based extender in one way or another. Essentially you use the mains cabling using special adapters to extend your wired network. You can plug a WiFi router into the remote end to extend your WiFi range without necessarily halving the speed (though don't expect massive speeds over the mains cabling in all cases).

Again BT have a wide range of products branded in their name that can help you. Take a look here: http://www.shop.bt.com/category/networking,network-d...

They have products that combine the mains extending and wifi all in one - plug one little gizmo next to your router, then you plug little WiFi extender gizmos wherever you have poor signal. BT WiFi Home Hotspot 500 does this, for example.

But BT isn't the only company that has this sort of kit, nor is the BT shop the only place you can get the BT-branded stuff. Check out Amazon where you'll see a million and one options.

Makes to search for are Devolo,, TP-link, D-Link and Netgear.
The Ethernet-over-mains technologies are known as Powerline and Homeplug

Amazon has most of the products in a "PowerLAN" category: Computers & Accessories : Networking Devices : PowerLAN Adapters.

Other things to search for would be "WiFi range extender".

Just keep in mind that mains-based products can work really badly. None of the properties I've wanted to use it in have been a success. Things like fridges, freezers, central heating and all sorts of other things can introduce a lot of noise that causes problems.


Okay thank you for that!

Would these be the equivalent of 'power line adaptors'?

I have tried power line adaptors, but the problem I found is that the signal cannot transmit across circuit breakers, and since the area of poor connectivity is on a different circuit to that of the router, it simply doesn't work!
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Sun 08-Feb-15 11:40:02
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Re: Improving wireless connection around my house


[re: sultanoflondon] [link to this post]
 
I've had Devolo hardware working between house and shed where the shed has a consumer unit of its own, and certainly working between the different mains rings on the different floors of the house.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
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