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  >> Home Networking, Internet Connection Sharing, etc.


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Standard User ukhardy07
(knowledge is power) Mon 11-Dec-17 11:28:19
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Re: Use a 2nd. router as a wifi extender


[re: anotherbob] [link to this post]
 
Wireless is only 300Mbps which is poor Iíd be looking for 1200 wireless AC or better in this day and age. Donít spend money on old technology.

we can assist getting you going itís not difficult - where are you getting stuck?
Standard User anotherbob
(newbie) Mon 11-Dec-17 11:46:18
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Re: Use a 2nd. router as a wifi extender


[re: ukhardy07] [link to this post]
 
Thanks for your response.
I found a cheapie on Ebay which I'm going to try.
If it's not up to the job I'll have to think again.
The biggest job it will have is live streaming SD TV to a 14" Laptop occasionally.
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 11-Dec-17 11:48:21
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Re: Use a 2nd. router as a wifi extender


[re: ukhardy07] [link to this post]
 
Wireless access points are not as cheap as they may have been in the past, but the Asus routers usually all have the choice of router mode or access point mode in their web interface so

ASUS RT-AC51U which starts at £39 gives an idea of price if you want to cost up the manual route versus out of the box route

https://www.asus.com/support/FAQ/1015009/ where Asus has the software switch in its web interface

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.


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Standard User dwg1
(newbie) Mon 11-Dec-17 17:52:20
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Re: Use a 2nd. router as a wifi extender


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
From what I can gather you have powerline adapters, and two spare routers. Configuring the routers to work in your existing setup isn't rocket science, and their signal strength may well out perform any access points you may buy too, plus they have four ethernet ports...
Standard User ukhardy07
(knowledge is power) Mon 11-Dec-17 18:25:25
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Re: Use a 2nd. router as a wifi extender


[re: dwg1] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by dwg1:
From what I can gather you have powerline adapters, and two spare routers. Configuring the routers to work in your existing setup isn't rocket science, and their signal strength may well out perform any access points you may buy too, plus they have four ethernet ports...
Lets be honest the DG834 was released in the early 2000s and is not a router fit for modern day usage e.g. heavy 4K netflix streaming etc, lots of students etc. The Sagemcom 2704N is one of the worst rated ISP supplied routers.
http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/plusnet/1403635/plusn...

On Fibre broadband, you want wireless AC devices, or at least dual band devices, you most definitely do not want wireless G from 10+ years ago.

If the poster installs a DG834 it will become the bottleneck of the network, with anything connected to it getting speeds much slower than the Fibre broadband is capable of.
Standard User dwg1
(newbie) Mon 11-Dec-17 22:32:28
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Re: Use a 2nd. router as a wifi extender


[re: ukhardy07] [link to this post]
 
Yes that does sound like old technology, but if it's only for the purpose of connecting a phone to, it should be up to the job smile
Standard User ukhardy07
(knowledge is power) Tue 12-Dec-17 01:09:18
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Re: Use a 2nd. router as a wifi extender


[re: dwg1] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by dwg1:
Yes that does sound like old technology, but if it's only for the purpose of connecting a phone to, it should be up to the job smile
Depends where you are, I'm in London with 20+ 2.4Ghz SSIDs. If I connect to the 2.4Ghz network all my iPhones will switch over to 4G data due to WiFi Assist, as the 2.4Ghz loads data so slowly. If you disable WiFi Assist, you struggle to even browse to a web-page (well it takes upwards of 30 seconds). I confirm this behaviour at 3 properties in London (as I've moved), all equally dense in local 2.4Ghz networks, on virginmedia, BT and Sky.

Here is a video of how 2.4Ghz performs in my home in London for most of the evening:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1e7Xm3Na9US_gtCIyLaB...

In London you often have 4 flats on-top of one another, and then 4 either side, and across the road the same thing.

As we keep adding in a bunch of 2.4ghz gear (e.g. bluetooth earphones for iphones 7s and 8s), wireless doorbells, baby monitors, cordless phones, microwaves, wifi APs, bluetooth speakers, bluetooth keyboards and mice etc, the spectrum is becoming very undesirable, even for casual browsing.

My advice stands, install 5Ghz APs in this day and age, and certainly where you add APs ensure you are aligning standards, roaming between an AC device on 5Ghz down to a 2.4Ghz device at wireless G 54Mbps is not nice. When I used to work with Aruba Networking it was a huge no-no to roll out in this way.
Standard User jabuzzard
(regular) Thu 04-Jan-18 12:48:15
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Re: Use a 2nd. router as a wifi extender


[re: anotherbob] [link to this post]
 
You can but I would advise strongly against it. The reason is that you won't get 802.11k support which is the ability to roam between WiFi access points. So while it "works" if you move the WiFi connected device around the home it all goes to $h!t very quickly. Basically when originally designed WiFi did not support roaming between access points. There have been some hacks to make it work on enterprise level kit (read expensive) in the past, but only comparatively recently has a proper standard been ratified.

Fortunately 802.11k consumer grade kit is not making into the market place. So your best bet is to disable the WiFi in your router completely and fit something like a BT Whole Home Wi-Fi system which is 802.11k capable. You can get two access points on Amazon for £90 at the moment and you can add more as required to get complete coverage. You could them back to the main router using powerline, but I would encourage anyone to move heaven and earth to run some Cat5e or better still Cat6 between the two.

Note that the BT Whole Home system also supports band steering so any 5GHz capable devices are moved to 5GHz by the system automatically leaving the heavily congested 2.4GHz bands to devices only capable of 2.4GHz.

All that said something like a Ubiquiti UAP-AC-LR access point centrally located may well do the trick depending on the size of the house. It did for me and my house has bricks that genuinely have large amounts of magnetic material in them, and all the internal walls are brick (or breeze block with a similar issue). Makes any sort of radio based reception inside the house very difficult. However to make that work you are likely going to need to ceiling mount the access point somewhere. Basically your router location is rarely the optimal WiFi access point location, and your optimal router location is almost never the optimal WiFi access point location.
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