General Discussion
  >> Broadband Not-spots & slow-spots


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.


Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | (show all)   Print Thread
Standard User mattwynne
(newbie) Mon 07-Jan-13 10:47:28
Print Post

Lochgoilhead


[link to this post]
 
We've bought a house near Lochgoilhead, here: http://www.broadband-notspot.org.uk/share/0849d3d8bb...

We're renovating the house so we haven't moved in yet, and in October I ordered broadband via IDNet.

We've gone through 3 months of rigmarole, and just been told on Friday that BT have said the line will not support broadband and have 'washed their hands of it'.

Neighbours either side of us have broadband, albeit fairly slow.

I met one friendly OpenReach engineer at the house who tested the line back to the exchange and found coils on it. He told me that because our line happened to be on an old trunk cable, it would need a different department within OpenReach to remove the coil. He explained that normally the teams that work on trunk cables deal with big jobs in city centres, and it was going to be hard work to persuade that department to come out to our little village to remove one coil from my line. And to work out who was going to pay for it.

It's so hard to tell, but my suspicion is that IDNet have just been fobbed off my BT and nobody has tried removing the coil.

Any advice on how to handle this? I'm tempted to give up on IDNet and move the line over to BT in the hope I'll have more luck dealing with them, but I don't want to just go back to the beginning of the 3-month process again. We move in in 3 weeks!
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 07-Jan-13 10:59:03
Print Post

Re: Lochgoilhead


[re: mattwynne] [link to this post]
 
Is the voice line up and running yet?

http://maps.thinkbroadband.com/?utm_source=mainsite&... shows the exchange location.

There are no obligations to provide broadband on a telephone line, so Openreach may and can simply say it is uneconomic to provide a service. The neighbours may be using the couple of decent lines by virtue of getting there first.

Andrew Ferguson, andrew@thinkbroadband.com
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User mattwynne
(newbie) Mon 07-Jan-13 13:29:03
Print Post

Re: Lochgoilhead


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Yes, we've had a voice line since about June.

I've just ordered a second line today via BT, to see whether I can get any more joy with that one.

The frustrating thing is, I'd be quite prepared to pay Openreach more money in order to get the service, but that option doesn't seem to be open to me.


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.

Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 07-Jan-13 13:36:42
Print Post

Re: Lochgoilhead


[re: mattwynne] [link to this post]
 
http://www.openreach-communications.co.uk/our-networ...

Network Rearrangement Team, but your retail provider should do this liason for you, and other you the list of charges. Though Openreach may remove the coils in their own good time, even standard broadband installs and phone line installs can take 6 to 8 weeks due to the delays caused by all the bad weather and other work going on.

Andrew Ferguson, andrew@thinkbroadband.com
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User Zarjaz
(knowledge is power) Mon 07-Jan-13 20:03:32
Print Post

Re: Lochgoilhead


[re: mattwynne] [link to this post]
 
If it's a loading coil the engineer was referring to, then it won't just be on your line, but most likely on a hundred pair feed cable, most likely E-side, maybe D.

Since it doesn't affect the speech part of the circuit, the people who need to deal with this on your behalf, are Plusnet. They raise an SFI or Boost task, and the engineer can then determine if there are no loaded spares that might be used to by-pass the offending equipment.

Standard User mattwynne
(newbie) Tue 08-Jan-13 12:20:52
Print Post

Re: Lochgoilhead


[re: Zarjaz] [link to this post]
 
Thanks for the info Zarjaz.

It's interesting because the excuse I heard was that removing the coils could mean the phone stopped working for speech.

I've since switched provider to IP River (formerly PC North) who seem to have a much better handle on the problem. They also suggested getting two lines and bonding them for a faster service (assuming they manage to get Openreach to actually give me a service).

Fingers crossed.
Standard User Gadget
(committed) Tue 08-Jan-13 19:00:42
Print Post

Re: Lochgoilhead


[re: mattwynne] [link to this post]
 
Loading coils were used to enable voice services on extremely long lines which otherwise would not have worked - if you are a very long way from the exchange it is entirely possible that your voice service is dependant on the presence of the coils and their removal would mean loss of telephony. It sould like a check to see if there are any unloaded circuits is the way forward.
Standard User delone
(experienced) Tue 08-Jan-13 20:42:32
Print Post

Re: Lochgoilhead


[re: mattwynne] [link to this post]
 
What about this?

http://www.toowaydirect.com/

Del
Standard User mattwynne
(newbie) Tue 08-Jan-13 20:44:01
Print Post

Re: Lochgoilhead


[re: Gadget] [link to this post]
 
When you say extremely long lines, how long are we talking?

I think we may have been given one of the old trunk lines that used to run right over to Cairndow (about 10 miles). I got the impression from the engineer that they don't used them anymore, so they will have wired them up to our house instead. So that would figure.

Is that plausible?

Would a coil normally be necessary for a line that's 4km from the exchange, as ours is?
Standard User partial
(member) Tue 08-Jan-13 21:28:34
Print Post

Re: Lochgoilhead


[re: mattwynne] [link to this post]
 
A cable will either have loading coils on or not. They won't swap circuits around or take some circuits off a pot and put new circuits on a pot. These are old junction cables with local break outs.

It is highly likely that the engineers who visit customers have never seen a loading pot and as such their advise is suspect.

I would be onto the CEO office. If your neighbours have service, it is likely the cable has been deloaded. If not, removing a loading pot on,say, a 160pr junction is a days work for two blokes which the CEO should have deep enough pockets for.

Edited by partial (Tue 08-Jan-13 21:33:10)

Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | (show all)   Print Thread

Jump to