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Standard User julesrudd
(newbie) Tue 07-Jan-14 17:51:56
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Advice on privately operated rural systems please


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Totally new to this and have been 'volunteered' by our parish in South Shropshire to research. We have copper cable broadband with average speed of 1MB. Some properties are too far from the exchange (2 miles) and can get no broadband. We have been advised we are not in an area which will be part of the rural development to get faster speeds and therefore we may have to go it alone. Individual satellite systems will be too expensive for many people here. Can we buy a group scheme?

I don't really know where to start. Any basic hints & tips + key words so I can begin my research. Many thanks.
Standard User Michael_Chare
(committed) Tue 07-Jan-14 19:04:41
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Re: Advice on privately operated rural systems please


[re: julesrudd] [link to this post]
 
You could research Gigaclear. They would install an FTTP solution.

For a viable Gigaclear project you need 30% of about 600 properties to commit to paying £37pm. The cost is not so bad if you discontinue a metal phone line and change to VOIP over the fibre link.

The area also needs to be where BT are unlikely to install an FTTC solution because of long property to cabinet line lengths.

Michael Chare
Standard User gah789
(learned) Thu 09-Jan-14 09:38:59
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Re: Advice on privately operated rural systems please


[re: julesrudd] [link to this post]
 
Gigaclear is the Rolls-Royce solution - high quality but expensive and you may need a community of at least 500 properties to have a reasonable shot at persuading them to take an interest. If satellite systems are too expensive for many, then this won't work.

For smaller scale communities, the best option is likely to be fixed wireless. There is a fixed wireless operator called Allpay with a service in Herefordshire who might be interested in expanding regionally. You can also search the members of INCA (www.inca.coop) for other small fixed wireless operators.

The majority of small wireless systems operate on a self-help basis. There is an increasing number of such systems in Scotland of our geography. Read material produced by the Tegola project (www.tegola.org.uk).

There are two key requirements for any wireless system. One, a high point that can be seen by many potential subscribers - perhaps your church tower. Two, a source of backhaul - i.e. a fibre link from your local distribution system to the internet spine. The fibre exists but getting access to it is either expensive or administratively difficult.

Very small systems (< 10 properties served) are easy and cheap. Small ones (10-50 properties) require more effort but may not cost more than £300 per property. For more than 50 properties served you may be able to attract a commercial provider if your geography is favourable. You will need to get firm commitments to take up the service pretty early because vague intentions are not sufficient to justify even quite small investments.

What you will learn rapidly is that there is a reason why almost everyone prefers to sub-contract the work to BT or another operator. Promoting community networks involves a lot of effort. But it is the only way by which many small communities are likely to see a significant improvement in their broadband service over the next 3-4 years. You can send me a PM if you need further information.

Edit: Let me add one further point. On checking I see that much of South Shropshire is an AONB. I live in one of the Scottish equivalents. The features that lead to landscapes being classified as AONBs complicate the development of wireless systems but they also explain why you won't get any other form of broadband quickly. The planning restrictions that are associated with AONB status may require special permission for wireless installations. I can provide some guidance but you should talk to your local planning department at a fairly early stage.

Edited by gah789 (Thu 09-Jan-14 09:51:35)


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Standard User julesrudd
(newbie) Thu 09-Jan-14 11:22:52
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Re: Advice on privately operated rural systems please


[re: julesrudd] [link to this post]
 
Wow, thank you, that is absolutely brilliant info. You have really helped me, thanks again, J
Standard User kitcat
(committed) Thu 09-Jan-14 14:32:39
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Re: Advice on privately operated rural systems please


[re: julesrudd] [link to this post]
 
Jules

I assume you have seen the map and postcode checker at the connecting Shropshire site .

You do not say which exchange and village you are looking at which helps give an idea of the area. All Shropshire is expected to have at least 2Mb by 2016 according to the council site above.

Even at 2 miles from the exchange you should get some sort of BB service see graph at 2 miles around 3Mb would be expected.

As you are not in an area to get the Rural development money some of the area may already be covered by the BDUK rollout. ( If you ask if you are covered by Rural development funds they may say NO but not tell you you are covered by existing BDUK rollout!)
Standard User Alfiescruff
(newbie) Thu 16-Jan-14 16:42:43
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Re: Advice on privately operated rural systems please


[re: julesrudd] [link to this post]
 
Jules,

How far are you from your nearest cabinet and what population surrounds the cabinet. Where abouts are you in Shropshire?
Standard User Fastman2
(newbie) Sat 01-Feb-14 21:26:39
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Re: Advice on privately operated rural systems please


[re: julesrudd] [link to this post]
 
jules - see openreach.co.uk - faq Around private funding -- also see villages like islip, little wenlock and Binfield heath
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