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Standard User godsell4
(regular) Thu 08-Jan-15 12:51:16
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Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[link to this post]
 
http://arstechnica.com/business/2015/01/fcc-chair-br...

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Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Thu 08-Jan-15 12:58:13
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Re: Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[re: godsell4] [link to this post]
 
So roughly in line in with EU aims to get superfast to everyone by 2020 and UK targets of 95% and higher

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User WWWombat
(knowledge is power) Thu 08-Jan-15 13:36:02
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Re: Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[re: godsell4] [link to this post]
 
So not really a change to the technical definition of "broadband", but more a political change of what is needed to count as "advanced telecoms capability" that the FCC can create statistics on.

This is a bit like Ofcom choosing their own definition of "superfast" (30Mbps), then creating whole reports based on this threshold.

In some senses, the American definition seems to be currently used as a form of USC, although the only thing that seems to happen if you (as an ISP) don't meet it is that the FCC nags you.

Currently set at 4Mbps, there have been arguments over raising it to 10Mbps, so you can imagine the result of suggesting it ought to be at 25Mbps.

We could do with a similar thing here. There's a lot of argument that 2Mbps is no longer sufficient as a USC, with Ofcom reporting that 10Mbps is a reasonable aim for functional broadband.


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Standard User mikejp
(regular) Thu 08-Jan-15 14:15:07
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Re: Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[re: WWWombat] [link to this post]
 
"Ofcom choosing their own definition of "superfast" (30Mbps)," - I thought that was an EU 'definition'? Subsequently chiselled away by HMG to '24Mb' and now down to '15Mb'. It is/(?was?) certainly the EU 'target' for 2020 which is about as close to a definition of the undefined as you will get in these 'ere parts..
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Thu 08-Jan-15 14:18:29
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Re: Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[re: mikejp] [link to this post]
 
UK gov started at 24 Mbps, then EU arrived independently at 30 Mbps and is the 2020 EU wide target.

The UK Gov has definitely not downgraded superfast to a figure of 15 Mbps. Some BDUK projects have superfast and 15 Mbps contractual targets in them, but there has been no shift in the superfast definition downwards, no matter how much some people claim.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User mikejp
(regular) Thu 08-Jan-15 15:15:13
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Re: Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Well, do you mean "people claim" like BDUK? The words "contractual targets" have a strong smell of weasel about them!

QUOTE
"must be designed in anticipation of providing at least ~15Mbps download speed to end-users for 90% of the time during peak times in the target intervention area"

I take it you accept that such areas will not, then, be in receipt of 'high speed broadband' by definition? In which case the target has been missed for these areas, has it not?

Like it or not, "15Mb" is now the accepted baseline, spin it how you will.
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Thu 08-Jan-15 15:28:25
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Re: Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[re: mikejp] [link to this post]
 
This argument is as old as the BDUK contracts.

The 15 Mbps refers to performance at peak times and is defining the base line performance, rather than the connection speed.

A 15 Mbps connection IS NOT a superfast connection by any definition in use of Ofcom, UK.gov or BT.

The spin is that the 15 Mbps figure allows them to say 94% high speed broadband with the subtitle 90% superfast.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User TheEulerID
(member) Thu 08-Jan-15 17:21:08
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Re: Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[re: WWWombat] [link to this post]
 
It seems to be about those operators in receipt of state funding. So, broadly speaking, what most BDUK projects expect for the great majority of premises connected (but not all of course). Also, EU state subsidy rules for NGAs anticipate something of this order as a minimum.

So not really any great change, more a reflection on what's happening in much of the western world.
Standard User TheEulerID
(member) Thu 08-Jan-15 17:24:26
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Re: Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[re: mikejp] [link to this post]
 
Contractual targets are a lot more solid than aspirational ones. They do, at least, have some potential for enforcement. Most like what has been arrived at is a compromise based on balancing overall coverage and speed within a given budget.
Standard User rogerfp
(newbie) Thu 08-Jan-15 19:38:27
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Re: Proposal for FCC to define broadband as 25Mb or greater.


[re: godsell4] [link to this post]
 
Seriously 4mb or even 25 mb is not even close to being classed as superfast broadband in 5 years or so. ADSL is passed its sell by date now and FFTC will soon be nearling it's end of life. Future requirements will far exceed these speeds.100mb should be a minimum to all of the UK by 2020. Setting such a low target of 25mb is like asking a high jumper want his minimum jump height is and he replying 4". Instead of spending £42 billion on an unneeded and unwanted 17th century technology as in HS2, spend 25% of that on running fibre optic to every corner of GB. Unfortunately we have politicians running the UK who just don't have a clue about technology and the speed and the importance it will be to life in the next few years.
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