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Standard User mikejp
(member) Sat 07-Nov-15 09:17:18
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Aha! A new 'promise'!


[link to this post]
 
What's the verdict on CMD and Boy George's latest 'spin' on a 10Mbps USO?

At least they acknowledge b/band is an ' essential service'.
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Sat 07-Nov-15 09:44:46
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Re: Aha! A new 'promise'!


[re: mikejp] [link to this post]
 
The devil will be the detail, but its a good step so long as it does not dilute any ambitions for increase superfast coverage beyond the current 95% contracts.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User TheEulerID
(committed) Sat 07-Nov-15 10:21:53
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Re: Aha! A new 'promise'!


[re: mikejp] [link to this post]
 
A legal right would have to be enshrined in law, so it can;t be a vague political statement. If it's like existing USOs for phone lines then there are some "reasonable cost" clauses plus some issues like second homes.

Also, the means of delivery may be left open (will it include wireless or satellite as options, or must it be fixed line?). Then there's the issue of which companies will be required to fulfil the USO and, finally, a little issue of how it is to be funded. The fixed line USO is financed through internal cross-subsidisation which essentially means those in urban areas pay a bit more for their lines in order to subsidise those in more expensive to service areas (although, of course, that internal cross-subsidy is only on customers of OR and KCOM lines that contribute to this - VM customers don't). BB is much more diverse - there are the major LLU players as well as BTR and VM to consider.

It's very possible that there's some form of behind-the-scenes negotiation going on between Ofcom, the government and BT about this which will impat on the Ofcom review current underway. At the very least a lot of lobbying.


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Standard User project_x_uk
(member) Sat 07-Nov-15 10:56:17
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Re: Aha! A new 'promise'!


[re: mikejp] [link to this post]
 
Personally I can't see it happening there will be some get out clause as getting certain customers on that would involve huge amounts of new ug cables being laid new pcp dslams etc and somebody would have to cover the cost
Standard User Senn
(newbie) Sat 07-Nov-15 11:27:23
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Re: Aha! A new 'promise'!


[re: mikejp] [link to this post]
 
I find it funny that on one hand they're saying we should all have fast connections, but on the other they're planning to snoop on everything we do on them.

As always, my trust in government is at zero.
Standard User gah789
(regular) Sat 07-Nov-15 11:39:51
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Re: Aha! A new 'promise'!


[re: TheEulerID] [link to this post]
 
Back to the future. For a long time all telephone bills in the US included a charge for the telco's mandatory contribution to a Universal Service Fund managed by the FCC which underwrote the costs of developing rural telephone systems. This was backed up by federally-guaranteed loans for rural telephone cooperatives and special tax provisions. There were similar arrangements for rural electricity networks managed by FERC.

Whether disguised or not there will have to be equivalent funding for a broadband fixed line USO. Competition concerns and market fragmentation will hinder any attempt to put the obligation on OR, since the number of fixed phone lines will decline rapidly even without this - look at the trend in the US. Hence, it will have to be an industry-wide levy. Best of luck in getting that accepted, bearing in mind what happened the last time it was proposed!
Standard User B31
(regular) Sat 07-Nov-15 20:13:20
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Re: Aha! A new 'promise'!


[re: mikejp] [link to this post]
 
Oh great, I might have to wait till 2020 for decent affordable Internet.

By which time 10 Mbps will be too slow for the modern world.



BT ADSL customer getting 1.7 Mbps (0.6 Mbps up) on a new road / new build development
CAB not FTTC enabled, not part of the 66% commercial plan. Not rural - no BDUK funding
(Virgin Media nearby)
Standard User kitcat
(committed) Sat 07-Nov-15 20:40:27
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Re: Aha! A new 'promise'!


[re: project_x_uk] [link to this post]
 
The reasonable cost, will be to the supplier rather than the customer just as in fixed phone lines. If they cost less than £1500 to reach an unserved premise BT pays if more the customer has to pay the extra. (Same for Water / Gas and Electricity.)

For min 10Mb BB I would expect the same thing (but maybe a different cost) and maybe with different possible suppliers. So could be by Radio / Fibre / Copper / Mobile operator ( not sure sat would be suitable BUT Govn may think it will)
Standard User gah789
(regular) Sat 07-Nov-15 21:25:43
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Re: Aha! A new 'promise'!


[re: kitcat] [link to this post]
 
Of course there will be such a cost threshold. There has be to avoid creating a huge potential liability.

However, that is not what the 'promise' appears to be - i.e. a commitment that everyone who wants it can have a broadband service with a minimum speed of 10 Mbps. In the longer term such announcements just generate accusations of bad faith aimed at those who make them without thinking through the consequences.
Standard User B31
(regular) Sun 08-Nov-15 16:14:08
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Re: Aha! A new 'promise'!


[re: kitcat] [link to this post]
 
Yeah, not necessarily fixed line.

I can use 4G here, but it is very expensive compared with a fixed line - especially when using services like netflix, now tv, etc.

Satellite probably not great for working at home - due to the latency.



BT ADSL customer getting 1.7 Mbps (0.6 Mbps up) on a new road / new build development
CAB not FTTC enabled, not part of the 66% commercial plan. Not rural - no BDUK funding
(Virgin Media nearby)
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