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Standard User CecilWard
(newbie) Wed 25-Oct-17 21:02:38
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TP LINK routers - how to remotely control one


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This is an absolutely fascinating article about finding security holes and working up an exploit to allow you to remotely take control of a router and own it.

Article giving details of analysing security holes in TP-LINK kit

TP-LINK's programming and quality standards seem horrendous. They did absolutely every single thing wrong that you can think of. But I imagine that plenty of other lazy outfits are just the same, buying software off-the-shelf which is very outdated, using discredited programming techinques with unsafe languages, untrained staff and no software QA reviews. They also went out of their way to make things much easier for the hacker, leaving clues around about the details of the software, leaving in debug facilities which should not be there in a production device - although to be fair, these issues just lower the cost of developing an exploit. One hilarious bit was how they left a huge clue to the existence of a vulernability, a bug neon sign for the hacker, just to save her some time, by putting in some dimwitted and completely pointless javascript code to stop users entering long string, which in this sad case only served to give the analyst a hint about the lack of parameter validation in the http server-based admin application. That says a lot about the morons they employed. If these poor dev guys were working under me - well they would be gone, or I would have trained them so this would be completely impossible. Also all code would be triple reviewed by humans whilst also being checked at several points with static and dynamic tools, so it wouldn't even get through a full final-stage build or in some cases a lack of sign-offs would mean the code would fail to get out of the door. It's a lot cheaper to never have any bugs at all in the first case.

Fixing the bugs doesn't make any difference. The fact that such shocking stuff was even possible shows that this company has no clue at all. I had some TP-link WAPs, but I haven't used them in a while. If I can't manage to secure them, then they are going in the bin.

I wonder now about the ZyXEL WAPs that I am using.
Standard User clyde123
(regular) Thu 26-Oct-17 10:13:05
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Re: TP LINK routers - how to remotely control one


[re: CecilWard] [link to this post]
 
TP Link stuff is generally decent priced, and generally works fine to well. It's aimed at the domestic market. It's not at all the worst stuff on the market, as in it functions well enough and does the job for most people.
All tech stuff has bug issues, some a lot worse than others. I've never found TP Link stuff to be a concern. And I've sold and installed a lot of their product.
Standard User broadband66
(fountain of knowledge) Thu 26-Oct-17 10:17:17
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Re: TP LINK routers - how to control one remotely


[re: CecilWard] [link to this post]
 
Fixed.

Was Eclipse Home Option 1, VM 2Mb & O2 Standard
Now Utility Warehouse (up to 16mbps) via Talk Talk


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Standard User ukhardy07
(knowledge is power) Thu 26-Oct-17 11:58:01
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Re: TP LINK routers - how to remotely control one


[re: CecilWard] [link to this post]
 
Every vendor has security holes, the key thing is they patch, and people implement the patches. ISPs auto-update the firmware for customers.

Here is Cisco for instance: https://tools.cisco.com/security/center/publicationL...

Everything is vulnerable to some degree.
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