Technical Discussion
  >> Technical Issues


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.


Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | (show all)   Print Thread
Standard User has
(experienced) Sat 28-Jul-12 17:31:37
Print Post

Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[link to this post]
 
I would be very grateful if you could clarify the above smile
I read somewhere that cable as opposed to copper wire adsl is more likely to be affected by rf interference.

The reason that I am asking this, is that I would like to know if I switch to cable provider, It would likely be a case of "out of the frying pan..."

H

Edited by has (Sat 28-Jul-12 17:34:49)

Standard User BatBoy
(legend) Sat 28-Jul-12 19:39:24
Print Post

Re: Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[re: has] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by has:
I read somewhere that cable as opposed to copper wire adsl is more likely to be affected by rf interference.
Where did you read that?


_____________________________________________________________________________________________ this is not usenet __________________
Standard User chris6273
(member) Sat 28-Jul-12 19:57:12
Print Post

Re: Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[re: BatBoy] [link to this post]
 
Well Cable (Coaxial Cable) is made out of copper the same as Telephone Cables, but the thing to note is that Telephone Cables are (Depending on the age of the cable) Twisted pair from the PCP to the premises (I believe) so because it is twisted, it has more of the ability to reject some noise.

Coaxial cable is simply a single Copper Core from one end of the cable to another so it can't be twisted and in most scenarios are more susceptible to noise as a result.

But on the other hand with ADSL (No FTTC services) there is copper all the way from the Premesis to the exchange whereas with Cable, it is copper to the Node/PCP and then fibre back to the exchange (FTTN) leaving the ADSL line more susceptible to noise as it has to run a longer distance (If the premesis is not near the exchange).

-------------------------------------------------------------------
My Broadband Speed Test

Downstream Upstream
Connection Speed: 24276 kbps 1211 kbps
Line Attenuation: 16.5 db 6.4 db
Noise Margin: 1.1 db 6.2 db

Edited by chris6273 (Sat 28-Jul-12 20:00:04)


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.

Standard User BatBoy
(legend) Sat 28-Jul-12 20:03:56
Print Post

Re: Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[re: chris6273] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by chris6273:
Coaxial cable is simply a single Copper Core from one end of the cable to another so it can't be twisted and in most scenarios are more susceptible to noise as a result.
This is nonsense.


_____________________________________________________________________________________________ this is not usenet __________________
Standard User TMCR
(member) Sat 28-Jul-12 21:07:03
Print Post

Re: Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[re: BatBoy] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by BatBoy:
In reply to a post by chris6273:
Coaxial cable is simply a single Copper Core from one end of the cable to another so it can't be twisted and in most scenarios are more susceptible to noise as a result.
This is nonsense.

I was just thinking the same - that could be the case, but only if the outer screen was totally missing for the entire run - in which case it wouldn't work anyway wink The screen is 'twisted' in it's criss-cross pattern along the length of the cable, to prevent RF and other interference - isn't it ?

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Virgin Cable (L)
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Sat 28-Jul-12 21:45:01
Print Post

Re: Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[re: has] [link to this post]
 
Packet loss is not the same as rf interference

Are you being mislead over the Time Division systems of DOCSIS where latency can be more variable.

ADSL is more prone to interference from external sources. Cable generally is designed to have cable lengths that guarantee the connection speed

Andrew Ferguson, andrew@thinkbroadband.com
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User has
(experienced) Sat 28-Jul-12 22:24:18
Print Post

Re: Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[re: TMCR] [link to this post]
 
.
Are you being mislead over the Time Division systems of DOCSIS where latency can be more variable

That was all a bit too technical for me smile


I thought that RF interference was a major cause of packet loss.

From reading posts in the Virgin Cable forums, it would appear that packet loss is a fairly common issue - on cable as well as copper.

I guess the only way I am really going to answer my question is through trying out cable broadband myself.

H

Edited by has (Sun 29-Jul-12 01:57:37)

Standard User TMCR
(member) Sat 28-Jul-12 23:47:48
Print Post

Re: Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[re: has] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by has:
From reading posts in the Virgin Cable forums...

That's probably where you are going wrong, the only time anyone posts anything there is of they have a problem, and most like to have a stab at the cause - even if they are barking up the wrong tree totally.
You posted a question in the technical issues forum so got technical answers. You can usually rely on the folks here to get it right, even if you've no idea what DOCSIS is wink
Oh yes, until I came here and started to read the various threads, I thought packet loss was confined to Parcel Force...

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Virgin Cable (L)
Standard User has
(experienced) Sun 29-Jul-12 01:59:00
Print Post

Re: Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[re: TMCR] [link to this post]
 
So what does cause packet loss if it is not rf interference?

Maybe if I outline the problem in a bit more detail, it might help:

I have two phone lines in the same street, connected to the same exchange, and with the same provider (BE). One is virtually free of packet loss, the other shows a constant pattern of packet loss (between 7am and 2pm,showing about 3% -5%loss, the rest of the day being fine).

I am able to monitor this as i have set up an f8lure graph as well as a thinkbroadband graph, both of which show the packet loss hitting during the same periods consistently.
The problem line has been tested by BE and Open reach and I have carried out all the usual diagonostic measures.

So I am now contemplating switching to Virgin, the only cable provider in my area (as I live in Chelsea, and my line goes straight to the exchange, I do not anticipate having an option to switch to fibre anytime soon - particularly with all the nonsense between Kensington and Chelsea Council and BT about cabinets being in not in keeping with the character of the borough etc.)

H

Edited by has (Sun 29-Jul-12 02:16:10)

Standard User bigluap
(learned) Sun 29-Jul-12 06:38:59
Print Post

Re: Is cable broadband more susceptible to packet loss?


[re: has] [link to this post]
 
Have a look at these links:-
http://www.ukinternetreport.co.uk/
http://www.ukinternetreport.co.uk/cmts/

nb it might say newbie, Been building PCs since 386SX25 late 80's
My network is VM 30 (soon to be 60) VMDG 480 Gigabit router 2 x cat5e cables to work room, one for gigabit to 8 port switch, second N WiFi router in dual channel mode 300 mbit/sec & other devices, the other for 10/100 to 16 port switch (runs at 200mbit according to the spec sheet) Printer etc.
Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | (show all)   Print Thread

Jump to