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Standard User worldofadsl
(knowledge is power) Wed 17-Dec-14 02:27:26
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RFoG


[link to this post]
 
There seems to be some confusion on some web sites I have been on, things I have read and what the end users are saying.

RFoG will not bring any faster speeds in the future. The only reason they are using RFoG is because it is so much cheaper to rollout a FTTP/FTTH network utilising RFoG than a traditional CATV network. It also allows quicker installation times...

Essentially all RFoG does is bring the optical node closer to end user.

AFAIK Virgin will be sticking with DOCSIS and not installing any GPON.

I was one of the original trail it's for RFoG back in 2011/2012.
Standard User Ignitionnet
(knowledge is power) Wed 17-Dec-14 08:31:34
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Re: RFoG


[re: worldofadsl] [link to this post]
 
RFoG removes the restrictions of RF amplifiers and delivers a higher quality signal due to not requiring any amplification, thus allowing higher speeds. The current DOCSIS networks are, at best, 5-65MHz on the return path, not all of which will be usable due to ingress, and 87MHz-1GHz downstream. RFoG has no such limitations.

There is a gigabit trial in the not too distant future in Papworth Everard, presumably using GPON. VM are trying different technologies.

VM aren't using RFoG for new installs right now, they are testing it out. A major issue with it is that it requires battery backup in order to allow telco services to be provided.

Unsure about how much quicker an RFoG installation is, an HFC installation doesn't require installation of a new, mains powered ONT at the customer site, but will defer that to those who are more knowledgeable on such things.

RFoG doesn't just bring the optical node closer to the end user, it replaces the coax run with fibre but the node is still shared between a number of customers. RFoG is installed as a passive optical network and is pretty simple to change to GPON should the operator require it, just a matter of switching what it's connected to.
Standard User worldofadsl
(knowledge is power) Wed 17-Dec-14 08:50:29
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Re: RFoG


[re: Ignitionnet] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Ignitionnet:
RFoG removes the restrictions of RF amplifiers and delivers a higher quality signal due to not requiring any amplification, thus allowing higher speeds. The current DOCSIS networks are, at best, 5-65MHz on the return path, not all of which will be usable due to ingress, and 87MHz-1GHz downstream. RFoG has no such limitations.

There is a gigabit trial in the not too distant future in Papworth Everard, presumably using GPON. VM are trying different technologies.

VM aren't using RFoG for new installs right now, they are testing it out. A major issue with it is that it requires battery backup in order to allow telco services to be provided.

Unsure about how much quicker an RFoG installation is, an HFC installation doesn't require installation of a new, mains powered ONT at the customer site, but will defer that to those who are more knowledgeable on such things.

RFoG doesn't just bring the optical node closer to the end user, it replaces the coax run with fibre but the node is still shared between a number of customers. RFoG is installed as a passive optical network and is pretty simple to change to GPON should the operator require it, just a matter of switching what it's connected to.


They already have 1.5gbps running over a DOCSIS network in the lab over a standard HFC setup.

RFoG doesn't replace the coax run completely. I was trying to simplfy what exactly RFoG is to the average person. That is why I said the most simple way to think about it is moving the optical node to the drop box where it then converts the fibre to coax. I know it's not quite that simple but it's the best way of putting it.

There is no major issue to do with RFoG and phone services. When I had a RFoG install for Virgin we were provided with a landline via the BT network through an LLU agreement in partnership with talk talk. The Virgin rep told me that the cost of providing battery backup, etc means it if more profitable to get a few quid commission off talk talk for the phone side of the service than providing it themselves. He said their main interest is. tv and Internet

RFoG will only ever be used in new build areas they won't roll it out over there whole network because is no point but for.new builds its the best option for CATV at the moment. It's so much quicker and cheaper to get in the ground than HFC.

I had 1gbps from Virgin using RFoG over 3 years ago so it's nothing new.


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Standard User Ignitionnet
(knowledge is power) Wed 17-Dec-14 09:39:10
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Re: RFoG


[re: worldofadsl] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by worldofadsl:
I had 1gbps from Virgin using RFoG over 3 years ago so it's nothing new.


What was the CPE you were using 3 years ago? Wasn't aware that 24 downstream CPE existed at that time. The earliest I'm aware of is an Intel Puma 6 based bit of kit announced in May 2012. Kit capable of 1.5Gb has only been around for a few months.

The RFoG trial in Papworth simply didn't come with a phone service. VM want to get rid of their own PSTN and replace it with VoIP across the board, which means battery backups on both ONT and CPE.
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 17-Dec-14 09:41:05
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Re: RFoG


[re: worldofadsl] [link to this post]
 
So if as claimed its coax for the final leg into the home, how does this differ from the standard install. How long would this coax segment be?

Always worth getting the 'experts' to tell us these snippets

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User worldofadsl
(knowledge is power) Wed 17-Dec-14 09:53:46
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Re: RFoG


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by MrSaffron:
So if as claimed its coax for the final leg into the home, how does this differ from the standard install. How long would this coax segment be?

Always worth getting the 'experts' to tell us these snippets


It's much quicker to blow fibre once you have a trained team than it is to do an average standard pull.
Standard User worldofadsl
(knowledge is power) Wed 17-Dec-14 10:04:07
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Re: RFoG


[re: Ignitionnet] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Ignitionnet:
In reply to a post by worldofadsl:
I had 1gbps from Virgin using RFoG over 3 years ago so it's nothing new.


What was the CPE you were using 3 years ago? Wasn't aware that 24 downstream CPE existed at that time. The earliest I'm aware of is an Intel Puma 6 based bit of kit announced in May 2012. Kit capable of 1.5Gb has only been around for a few months.

The RFoG trial in Papworth simply didn't come with a phone service. VM want to get rid of their own PSTN and replace it with VoIP across the board, which means battery backups on both ONT and CPE.


I was never told what CPE I was using.... Fujitsu didn't really give us that kind of info.
Standard User Ignitionnet
(knowledge is power) Wed 17-Dec-14 10:33:54
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Re: RFoG


[re: worldofadsl] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by worldofadsl:
I was never told what CPE I was using.... Fujitsu didn't really give us that kind of info.


There wasn't a badge on the Superhub-type thing?

I do remember the trial from last time actually. It was a PIA trial with Fujitsu building the network and VM and TalkTalk delivering services over it.

Wasn't aware that VM went up to 1Gb on RFoG, was only aware of trials at 100Mb, so thanks for that info. I know that TalkTalk were delivering 1Gb via point to point fibre on the same trial but RFoG doing 1Gb is a new one.

If VM are going to deliver RFoG to new build how are they going to use TalkTalk's LLU network for telco? New build estates won't have any Openreach network for LLU?

Edited by Ignitionnet (Wed 17-Dec-14 10:34:59)

Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 17-Dec-14 11:28:40
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Re: RFoG


[re: worldofadsl] [link to this post]
 
And so what is different in the home? Do people still get a coax buried under their drive, which is what your post implies

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User worldofadsl
(knowledge is power) Wed 17-Dec-14 13:48:49
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Re: RFoG


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
No it is fibre up to the outside wall of the property where it then converts to coax.
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