User comments on ISPs
  >> Wireless Broadband ISPs (not wireless ADSL routers)


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.


These posts have been archived and can no longer be replied to or modified.
Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | (show all)   Print Thread
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Mon 08-Oct-07 12:59:12
Print Post

WIMAX


[link to this post]
 
Freedom4 emerging rival/threat to Mr Li in UK? Discuss. I've registered.
Standard User yarwell
(sensei) Tue 09-Oct-07 18:06:35
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
still looks like a localised minority interest effort. Is there any sniff of pricing or end user speeds ?

Phil

666 kbytes/s with Demon
TalkTalk Dictionary : "Free" = £15/month. "Up to 8M" = 0.5, 1 or 2M.
MaxDSL diagnostics
Yet another petition !
Standard User Ashaman
(newbie) Fri 12-Oct-07 20:26:16
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: yarwell] [link to this post]
 
I am not impressed with the speeds, to be quite honest with you, there has been all this hype about Wimax and what it can do.

One of the first ISP's to market it and they do it at 1Mbps each way for residential and 4Mbps each way for businesses, not exactly fast, these speeds and a lot more can be achieved with normal 5.8Ghz kit.

Ashaman


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.

Standard User Ra1neh
(newbie) Thu 18-Oct-07 13:20:48
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Ashaman] [link to this post]
 
Currently using Freedom4/PipexWireless as part of the MK trial.

While im a residental customer they have given me a 4mb down 2mb up conenction free untill the trial ends (note:this isnt the fixed connection that offers 4mb eitherway) its the EasyST modem. Speed tests average at around 3.5mb down 1.5mb up though. (cant post any tests at work atm) Im on a 1:1 contention I think as although the rate drops when the signal goes bad, It never does when full signal.
Im still unsure of the prices but I have been told they will be "reasonable" well in MK at least as if I understand correctly the local council will be runing a VISP using Freedom4s network, as a subsidized rate, called Connect:MK

Since the trial started (feb this year?) ive uploaded over 2TB of "info" and download about the same and yet ive never got the standerd fair usage [censored], I have had a few problems over the time ive been with them, but everytime ive rang there freephone support centre the call has been picked up within 3 rings and no waiting on hold, This really is nothing like the joke they call CS over at Pipex (dsl).

Connection times for games are 40-60ms on uk severs and reasonably stable, rising the father you go across europe like "normal" connections

All in all its a fantasic bit of kit, sure those with 20mb cable connections, and fast DSL connections need not consider this, but for those who, like me can only get 512k aDSL at present (BLEH Milton Keynes) its fantasic.

Any questions feal free to PM or post

(still unable to get in to the EasyST(modem) config though)
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Tue 30-Oct-07 21:03:44
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Ra1neh] [link to this post]
 
So what is the problem with Now Wireless B/Band? Why can't they provide similar speeds to the many flat dwellers etc.who wish to avoid copper for whatever reason, in the West London and Thames Valley areas?
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Tue 20-Nov-07 13:48:12
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Here is an edited response kindly provided by a subscriber following a request I made for his views about his Netvigator service in HK:

"Here is my understanding about PCCW in Hong Kong.
Early this year, there was news about Mr. Richard Li preparing to sell off his telephone business to Singaporean buyers, but the deal has been cancelled. However, Netvigator and NOW-TV are certainly cash cows and will remain an on-going business. Recently, twenty more channels have been added to NOW-TV, in co-ordination with Mr. Run Run Shaw's TVB. Both the internet and NOW-TV signals come via the same ADSL modem and the same copper wire that supplies the telephone service.
It is expected that the Netvigator ISP internet service will continue. My Netvigator account is said to be 8Mb/s, but most of the time, the maximum speed I achieve downloading, is about 6Mb/s. The average is 3Mb/s due to the band width limit set by the server on the other end. In the present situation, 8Mb is more than sufficient for practical use in the near future.
I do not know whether Netvigator intends to introduce optical fibre in Hong Kong, although optical fibre is offered by competitors. Considering the situation referred to above, copper wire should still survive for five years or more.
Many mobile telephones feature WiFi so you can go on the internet while travelling, but I have not enquired about the WiFi market here and do not know whether PCCW is a major player in the field. A notebook PC I recently bought, also features WiFi connectivity, although I have not subscribed to the service.
The cost of Netvigator, it is about HK$240 (£15) per month for 8Mbps internet and a basic plan for NOW-TV.

Hope the above information can satisfy your needs."

Another fine example of Rip-off Britain

Anonymous
(Unregistered)Fri 30-Nov-07 09:04:38
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
NOW still in evaluation mode not taking new business. does Ford stop selling Fiesta when developing a new model? Why does the regulator not act on denial of service? There must be a clause in Govt. sale document.
Standard User yarwell
(sensei) Sat 01-Dec-07 15:57:21
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
In reply to:

There must be a clause in Govt. sale document.


I don't recall any obligation to provide a service, otherwise they would have to provide national coverage after buying up all the licenses.

Phil

666 kbytes/s with Demon

MaxDSL diagnostics
Video search with blinkx
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Tue 11-Dec-07 10:22:30
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
NOW I've been doing some resarch under PCCW and found some interesting reports that I had previously missed:-

http://news.zdnet.co.uk/communications/0,1000000085,39149852,00.htm

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/09/15/pccw_uk_broadband_wireless/

http://community.zdnet.co.uk/blog/0,1000000567,200510-1r-1d-2000331777b-3,00.htm
(scroll down to 12.10.05)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2006/jul/20/insideit.guardianweeklytechnologysection1

Many unrealised dreams here, also indications of the type of research that might be in progress (at a somewhat leisurely pace).
Could it be the case that these aerials are actually being used for3G phone internet backhaul as forecast in the first link?

Standard User RebeccaLovejoy
(member) Wed 12-Dec-07 18:16:22
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
People out in the backwoods on long lines need an alternative to BT. The sooner the better I say.

WiMax Rocks.
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Fri 21-Dec-07 10:48:31
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RebeccaLovejoy] [link to this post]
 
Freedom4 in MK! 20 quid for 1Gig! What kind of a deal is that? No roamin'. No phone. No TV. The punters must have to be really desperate.
Standard User PeteK
(knowledge is power) Sun 23-Dec-07 20:25:45
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
yeah and the wireless masts on the telephone exchanges giving the longest hop to the EU but the cheapest backhaul.... Hmmmm not sure about the sense on this one.

-----------------------------------------------------------
Free Setup / Install on selected Business SDSL's for Christmas
-----------------------------------------------------------
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Mon 24-Dec-07 10:27:10
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: PeteK] [link to this post]
 
Read the pithy comments following the TB News Item! Why do Wireless B/band users get such poor service?
Standard User PeteK
(knowledge is power) Mon 24-Dec-07 18:23:30
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Yup, have done. I'm really not sure about their motives and planning, but I guess time will tell and its got to be better for lots of MK residents than their TPON / extra long lines.

Having said that, from a business perspective, if they get their backhaul and deliveyr right, they will slap a lot of small business leased lines / SDSLs in the pants with that pricing and I suspect that is in the back of their mind regarding mast locations. These are high priced, generally low volume and ususally little hassle customers...

-----------------------------------------------------------
Free Setup / Install on selected Business SDSL's for Christmas
-----------------------------------------------------------
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Tue 15-Jan-08 10:50:46
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: PeteK] [link to this post]
 
Re latest news item:- Vodafone has announced its continuing partnership with Huawei...
As you are no doubt aware, Huawei is a really big global player and it so happens that the parent of NOW (PCCW) also uses their kit in the Orient.
UKBroadband (aka NOW) has official permission to operate a mobile wireless service and have already trialled such a service in the Thames Valley.
UKGov is also set to auction new spectrum soon.
Can we expect a re-launch from NOW Wireless B/band anytime soon? Don't hold your breath.
(As if anyone cared!)
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Thu 17-Jan-08 13:09:10
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Here is a review comparing Vodaphone and 3 services.
http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/networking/?p=421
NOW Wireless B/band currently uses the UTStarcomMovingMedia 6000 Desktop Modem.
I just wonder how it might compare with a similar device from Huawei?
In the meantime, we eagerly await the arrival of Kijoma here in London.
Standard User brokenarrow
(regular) Fri 18-Jan-08 23:44:05
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Sorry bit off topic.......

RadioJock - I'm glad to see another fellow NOW user on here - just been having a look through all the NOW posts on here!! I was on the verge of cancelling after my contract was up.... I spoke to the customer service rep who mentioned that NOW were expanding capacity as I think they were struggling with the amount of users! Also, he mentioned they were looking into further development (speed, capacity etc) before they started taking new customers.

I've got the 1MB service and am fairly happy with it... I do have the odd problem when the UTS modem decides to stop working..... it happens randomly, usually after the modem has been connected for longer than a week or so, which is remedied by restarting the modem. This is strange as I usually get the maximum 5 bars of signal strength (I use an iMac so can't see the exact signal strength, I think you can with the PC software). Do you experience the same problem? I'm wondering if my modem may be faulty.
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Sat 19-Jan-08 05:35:35
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: brokenarrow] [link to this post]
 
Hi,

I'm a fellow NOW user, have been since they started here in the Thames Valley. I also have the 1MB service, and yes the UTS modem does stop randomly from time to time.

We have a switch between the power supply and the modem, and we simply switch it off there, wait a minute or so and then switch it back on. Works fine.

I just wish they would up the speed; these days 1MB is simply not fast enough. Still, we are at the end of the xchange line, so this has been a real boon. If it had not been fot NOW, we would still be on dialup.
Standard User brokenarrow
(regular) Sat 19-Jan-08 15:44:10
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
Another NOW user!

Yeah, I find the whole restarting the modem a bit of a pain but it doesn't happen often.

I agree with the speed issue, I live too far from my exchange to get anything higher than 0.5MB and having the NOW service at 1MB is a godsend, but I'd still like to see an improvement in the speed.
Standard User kijoma
(learned) Sun 27-Jan-08 23:41:41
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RebeccaLovejoy] [link to this post]
 
hi,

As a fixed wireless provider offering considerably higher bandwidths that Wimax offers over notably longer distances i find wimax is an over hyped system that due to its intrinsic bandwidth limitations is a dead duck before it gets established

Can it pump 70 Mbps TCP ?, nope.. can it do at least half this over 25 km?, yee nope.

effectively wiamx users will be sharing a low bandwidth (in modern terms) pipe using a round robin sharing algorithm.

want speed?, emaill us

Bill Lewis - MD
Kijoma Broadband - (Division of Kijoma Solutions Ltd)
High Speed Wireless broadband ISP
The UK's top rated Wireless ISP 2005 - 2007 - ISP Review
Members of the Internet Service Providers association (www.ISPA.org.uk)
http://www.kijoma.net
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Wed 13-Feb-08 16:02:55
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
That threat gathers pace

http://www.intel.com/pressroom/archive/releases/20080211corp.htm?iid=pr1_releasepri_20080211r
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Wed 13-Feb-08 17:08:54
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
And here's a glorious touch of cynicism with an F4 joke in its tail:

http://community.zdnet.co.uk/blog/0,1000000567,10007300o-2000331777b,00.htm?new_comment

Oh and guess what - the Auction is delayed!
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Wed 05-Mar-08 23:54:16
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Recent news items together with today's announcements from AOL, Fast4 and Be, have got me unsettled again.
My £14 deal with NOW Wireless has become ridiculous - I strongly doubt that UK Broadband have any other customers hanging on waiting for the big long promised upgrade or whatever. C'mon guys make your move, don't be such a Clunky Gordo.
Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Sat 15-Mar-08 12:04:16
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Here be treasure :-
http://tinyurl.com/2bdop4

Then follow the link to Metamaterial
and if you are really hooked

From there click on the link to SmallNetBuilder.
Wish this stuff was in my UTStarcom MovingMedia 6000 CTE

Sigh.

Standard User RadioJock
(learned) Mon 17-Mar-08 11:43:04
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Is this a possibility? A Wireless Modem combined with Wireless LAN Access Point/Router - all in one box.
Just as you can get for ADSL, except No Wires! and not shackled to copper/fibre.
Please respond Mr Li.
Standard User semper
(newbie) Sat 22-Mar-08 00:40:36
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
regarding NOW, i have been checking their website for what seems like ages, upwards of 2 years? and they just don't seem to be moving onwards beyond the initial rollout in the thames valley. there must be a reason for this? surely they were planning on going elsewhere? have they had problems?
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sat 22-Mar-08 12:48:37
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: semper] [link to this post]
 
Dear Always,
In a nutshell, having secured a significant chunk of UK radio spectrum, the parent Co. - UK Broadband (subsidiary of Hong Kong based PCCW) owned by Canadian Richard Li, has (so far) failed to deliver a comprehensive service.
It seems that the Regulator lacks any power of enforcement.

The roll-out continued after Thames Valley, into West London, accompanied by publicity campaigns. In fact they actually innovated in the Reading area, by offering (at extra cost) a laptop modem allowing users to roam away from home, within range of their masts of course. I cannot recall any comments about this service, since the take-up might have been low, possibly due to lack of coverage. When introduced, it could have been outwith their licence because, recently, they have been granted an extension to utilise the 3.4GHz spectrum for a mobile wireless service.

It has been reported that NOW achieved 14,000 subscribers a year or two ago. However, last year NOW ceased taking on new customers. Having previously expressed intentions to expand the performance of the existing 1MB offer, enquiries reveal that they are exploring the way forward and have been for some time.

The fact is that it must be accepted that this policy reflects the general situation vis-a-vis WiMax and competing technologies, in both the UK & US at the present. Meanwhile, NOW lags way behind the ready availability of cheap ADSL in urban areas and does not serve rural communities. We hear about rivals such as Kijoma advancing from the South and ambitious plans to expand Freedom4 from the North, although the citizens of MK have been remarkably silent about the latter, of late.
Standard User semper
(newbie) Sat 22-Mar-08 16:48:21
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
cheers for info, always appreciated....
Standard User dslamdunk
(learned) Tue 25-Mar-08 21:29:23
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
From Telegraph - Google is lobbying US FCC to open up access to spectrum to allow cheaper wireless broadband. It envisages low cost "Wirelss 2.0" netwrok using television airwaves after switchover to digital next year.
Standard User rediproof
(learned) Tue 01-Apr-08 14:13:28
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Came across this announcement from Ofcom http://www.ofcom.org.uk/media/news/2007/11/nr_20071122 from Nov 07

Ofcom today announced its decision, following consultation, to amend the radio spectrum licence held by UK Broadband Limited. The change will allow the company to offer internet connections to portable or mobile devices as well as to fixed locations across the UK.

UK Broadband’s current Wireless Telegraphy Act licence permits the company to operate broadband fixed wireless access in the 3.5 GHz band. The company had asked Ofcom to change its licence to make it technology and application neutral, giving it greater flexibility over how it can use the radio spectrum. It also sought an increase in its permitted power levels.

Ofcom believes that removing restrictions on the licensee will benefit consumers, encourage competition, optimise use of the spectrum and is therefore in the interests of citizens and consumers. Ofcom also believes that the likelihood of interference to other users is low.
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Thu 03-Apr-08 11:21:40
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: rediproof] [link to this post]
 
Time we had a note about the results of the recent US 700MHz Auction. I think this is one of the more concise reactions:
http://www.wirelessdesignasia.com/article-8139-abiresearchcommentsonthe700mhzspectrumauctionresults-Asia.html
Do these results provide any lessons for the UK's pending auction of existing TV bandwidth?
Or will it also be the case that our current market leaders will prevail.
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Wed 09-Apr-08 12:12:08
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Wireless users need a Femtocell akin to this Thomson device, in which the ADSL modem is replaced by a Wireless Internet modem with multiple smart aerials - for reception/transmission and indoor communications with home computers and mobile phones:
http://labs.pcw.co.uk/internet_broadband/index.html
All the other stuff on offer would be cake topping.
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 14-Apr-08 13:47:06
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
The Register 04.04.08
"Ofcom tempts bidders for 2.6 GHz Auction"

Ofcom has laid out its plans for the largest UK spectrum auction yet, which it said will underpin the rollout of high-speed mobile broadband services.
The regulator is releasing 205MHz of spectrum in the 2010-2025MHz and 2500-2690MHz bands. It says this spectrum – dubbed 2.6GHZ - could be used for a number of purposes, but high-speed, high-capacity wireless data services over 3G and WiMAX are likely to be top of the list.
In line with its recent policy, the regulator said it will leave it down to the bidders how they actually use the spectrum, subject to minimal specs to prevent interference. The licences will be for a minimum of 20 years, and spectrum can be traded.
The minimum price for each chunk of spectrum will, in effect, be £100,000. All bidders will have to pony up a deposit for that amount before their bids are considered.
The details of the proposed auction are here:
http://www.ofcom.org.uk/consult/condocs/2ghzregsnotice/
Once the details are finalised, bidding should get under way this summer. ®

Someone pass round the hat, lets have-a-go.
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Wed 16-Apr-08 12:19:34
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Match this Mr Li:

UTStarcom and Motorola help First International Telecom build Taiwan WiMAX network Vision of city-wide mobile wireless communications network one step closer to reality in Taipei.

Motorola and its partner UTStarcom are working with First International Telecom (Fitel), a telecom operator in Taiwan, to deploy a mobile WiMAX network based on the IEEE802.16e-2005 standard as a part of the operator's commitment to the M-Taiwan project.

"The next generation personal wireless broadband service will enable rich media entertainment and high-speed data applications to be delivered to our customers. The new network will expand our service offerings and is critical to our future business growth," said Charlie Wu, president of Fitel. Fitel received its operator license to provide WiMAX services for northern Taiwan in July 2007. The carrier currently provides mobile communications services in Taiwan to over 1 million subscribers using its PHS network.

WiMAX base stations are expected to be readied in the downtown Taipei area by the first half of 2008. Testing for Fitel's part of the M-Taiwan program will commence at that time. The M-Taiwan project is a government initiative to accelerate WiMAX ecosystem development and create a city-wide broadband network for consumers. M-Taiwan fosters four objectives[1]:

Enhance Infrastructure: Reducing digital divide by achieving wireless broadband coverage in the urban area to 80~90% and rural area to 30~40%.
Upgrade the Capability of the Communications Equipment: Achieving over 50% usage of domestic equipment and incubating 1~2 system vendors.
Create a Mobile Data Service Industry: Establishing domestic mobile data services and incubating 2~3 service solution companies.
Build a Competitive Mobile Industry Environment: Selecting 2~3 fixed network operators for WiMAX trials and creating integrated data, video, and IPTV services.

[1] M-Taiwan Program, WiMAX Forum; March 2007

By Jeff Orr
ORR Technology, LLC

15.04.08
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 21-Apr-08 11:59:03
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Couple more background items while we await developments. One old, one new.

This article from Techworld : www.techworld.com
WiMax plans 3G-killer option - Busting out of the spectrum ghetto

By Peter Judge Published 17 January 2008

Equipment vendors are quietly working on a WiMax technology that could challenge options for cellular telecoms networks, by allowing the technology out of its small spectrum "ghetto," into the main 3G band due to be allocated this year.

The WiMax Forum is making a profile for mobile WiMax that uses "paired" FDD (frequency division duplex) signalling, with separate channels for uplink and downlink. Telcos and regulators such as the ITU prefer FDD, and most of the spectrum for 3G and 4G networks requires it. WiMax standards and equipment have focussed on TDD (time division duplex), in which uplink and downlink signals have separate time slots on a single channel - but which is limited to smaller bands of spectrum.

"The WiMax forum will have an FDD profile for Mobile WiMax inside six months. We've been working on it for the last twelve months," Paul Senior, chief technology officer of WiMax vendor Airspan told Telecoms.com.

The ITU endorsed WiMax for use in the IMT 2000 2.6GHz spectrum in May 2007, but operators have expected to limit its deployment to a smaller part of this spectrum which would be designated for TDD technologies: 50MHz in the middle of the band, sandwiched between two paired 70MHz chunks for FDD.

In the UK, the regulator Ofcom will auction the 2.6GHz spectrum this year. Ofcom operates a "technology neutral" policy, and is expected to find a way round the band plan set out by European body CEPT, but operators may nevertheless have to fall in step with the rest of the world, for international roaming to take place.

The Forum seems to have been playing a strategic game, gaining ITU approval for WiMax, before announcing the more aggressive move to create an FDD profile: "We've been a bit quiet about it because we wanted to get the IMT 2000 decision," said Senior. "And if we had gone to IMT with an FDD profile, we probably couldn't have got it through. We decided to go for something that was a little less threatening, which was a TDD profile. We didn't talk too much about the FDD work which we've been doing for the last 18 months. There will be an FDD profile, it will sit at 2.5GHz FDD allocations just as well as any other technology."

TDD technologies have traditionally been the poor relation in telecoms, with small amounts of spectrum allocated to it, but even these have not been well used, since TDD versions of 3G networking have never taken off. By approving WiMax, the ITU thought it was only allowing it into these TDD ghettos, but now the FDD profile may allow it into wider swathes of spectrum.

Although the WiMax industry has kept a lid on FDD WiMax, "that cat is now truly out of the bag and is now frolicking amongst the pigeons," said Dean Bubley of Disruptive Analysis. "I'd had some hints about this before, but I'd thought the main aim was to get WiMax working in paired-spectrum 700MHz bands in the upcoming US auction."

FDD WiMax could well be pitched head-on against HSPA, EVDO, LTE and other 3G technologies in the 2.5Ghz band, according to Bubley. I wonder if that means that Ofcom and other regulators need to go back to the drawing boards and re-work their interference assumptions for a possible cellular/WiMax mix across the whole band."


ars Extract:
WiMAX bodyslam met with piledriver from its many backers

By Eric Bangeman | Published: March 24, 2008

Sprint believes that the problems encountered by Buzz Broadband are specific to that company and its choice of vendors. The wireless provider points to the example of WiBro's successful WiMAX deployment in Korea as evidence that WiMAX has a bright future in front of it.

Buzz Broadband's problems are indicative of the challenges that new technologies face as they are rolled out, rather than of a fatal flaw in the WiMAX spec. "WiMAX won't work as advertised on day one, but over time it will," Myhrer told Ars. It's important for Sprint to get Xohm's launch right, Myhrer believes, but the ultimate indicator of WiMAX's success will come in the "BRIC countries" (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). "If Sprint deploys WiMAX successfully, but those countries don't, it will ultimately be a niche technology," said Myhrer.

There are two other bits of data to note here. First, Buzz Broadband uses the fixed version of WiMAX, which is heavily reliant on line-of-sight. A Sprint spokesperson highlighted that as an important distinction between Buzz and Xohm, which uses the mobile flavor (Ars attended a demo of mobile WiMAX during a Chicago River cruise last year). Also, Buzz operates in the 3.5GHz spectrum, which doesn't propagate as well indoors. In contrast, Sprint and Clearwire are using 2.5GHz spectrum for their Mobile WiMAX, which will penetrate better indoors. The takeaway? Despite the problems Buzz has had in Australia, WiMAX's future—and present—still look bright.

More Details http://www.commsday.com/node/228

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 25-Apr-08 22:51:54
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
I find this report profoundly depressing:
http://www.unstrung.com/document.asp?doc_id=151697
What kind of Regulation continues to permit these charades?

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sat 03-May-08 13:25:11
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Not much of note this week, apart from continuing spread of WiMAX initiatives across countries lacking copper infrastucture, and this:

UK mobile firms threaten to sue Ofcom over spectrum
From Dow Jones Newswires 28 April 2008

Operators up in arms over regulator's plan to auction off so-called 3G extension band in September.
U.K. mobile operators are threatening legal action against communications regulator Ofcom to delay September's auction of phone spectrum, The Guardian reports Monday, without citing sources.

"Ofcom plans a multibillion-pound auction of the 3G expansion band in September.
The industry is angry about comments last week by Ofcom Chief Executive Ed Richards calling for a review of how they use their existing bandwidth, the report says. It says the companies argue that without a proper idea of what they can do with their existing spectrum, they can't calculate how much of the 3G expansion band they will need.

Last year, Ofcom proposed to refarm more than a third of the mobile phone spectrum used by Vodafone Group PLC and Telefonica SA's O2 to sell to rivals to run third-generation services."

A TV Union is also annoyed by O/c plans



NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 05-May-08 00:03:23
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Re Friday post, full version of the Guardian article is more informative:

Telecom firms ready to sue over sale of airwaves
Richard Wray The Guardian, Monday April 28 2008

Mobile phone operators are threatening legal action against Ofcom to delay September's multibillion-pound auction of phone spectrum. The operators are required to register their interest in the new spectrum in July.
The industry is angry about comments last week by Ed Richards, head of Ofcom, that called for a re-think of the way they use their existing bandwidth.

The regulator is planning to sell a chunk of the spectrum known as the 3G expansion band in September. The capacity on offer is 40% larger than the 3G spectrum the government sold eight years ago. That auction took place at the height of the dotcom boom and raised £22.5bn.

The 3G expansion band can be used for the next generation of super-fast wireless broadband, a project named Long Term Evolution. But a row with the regulator has broken out over the way operators use their existing spectrum.

Last year Ofcom proposed grabbing back more than a third of the mobile phone spectrum used by Vodafone and O2 to sell to rival firms so they can run 3G services on it. Ofcom hoped the move - termed a "re-farming" - would bring wireless broadband services to a greater proportion of the population.

A firm decision was due in the summer, just before the sale of the 3G expansion band.

In his evidence to a joint session of the Commons culture, media and sport, and business and enterprise committees, Richards admitted that the weight of responses to his plan means he will have to re-open the issue to consultation over the summer. The companies argue that without a proper idea of what they can do with their existing spectrum, they cannot work out how much of the 3G expansion band they will need.

Other companies including BT are pushing for the sale because they want to use it for a super-fast wireless broadband access technology called Wimax.

The mobile phone operators have suggested Ofcom could sell a small portion of the spectrum that the likes of BT could use for Wimax services but wait until after the re-farming issue is resolved before selling the bulk of the airwaves.

Ofcom, however, argues that under its remit to ensure an effective use of spectrum it must press on with a sale because firms are ready to run enhanced services on it.





NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sat 17-May-08 13:30:29
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Some interesting news after a spell of inaction:-
[link]http://www.totaltele.com/View.aspx?ID=100346&t=2&en=1[/link]

Original Story :
Ofcom details L-Band spectrum auction
Looking to use new spectrum for mobile communications
Comments
NEWS: 7 December 2007 12:35 GMT by Stuart Miles

Ofcom has published details of its plans to auction radio spectrum suitable for a range of services including mobile television and satellite radio.
The so-called "L-Band" is being positioned to be used for mobile multimedia services including mobile TV, satellite digital radio; and broadband wireless access or high speed internet on the move.
Ofcom expects the auction process, which will be held online, to start in spring 2008.
The spectrum will be released on a technology and service neutral basis, allowing users the flexibility to decide what technology to use, what services to offer and to change their use of the spectrum over time. All licences will be tradable.
The release of the spectrum in the 1452-1492MHz band is part of a wider programme to release around 400MHz of spectrum at prime frequencies below 3GHz.
Other awards in this programme include the digital dividend – the highly-valued spectrum that will be freed-up through the switch to digital television plus Channel 36 which is within the television bands - and the 2.6GHz bands.

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 23-May-08 11:42:28
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Apologies for the broken link above. Story reads as follows:

NEWS: 16 May 2008 11:28 GMT by Amy-Mae Elliott

Qualcomm has announced that it has acquired 40MHz (1452-1492MHz) of L-Band radio spectrum in the recent Ofcom auction, at a cost of £8,334,000.
The company says this acquisition will allow Qualcomm, in collaboration with its partners, to bring a "variety of innovative wireless technologies to the UK market".
Although no plans are being revealed at this early stage, this chunk of spectrum is "technology neutral" and would be suitable for such service as mobile television, wireless broadband and satellite radio.

“Winning this license creates an opportunity for Qualcomm to explore emerging business models and advanced mobile technologies”, said John Caterer, managing director, UK, Qualcomm Europe, Inc.
“If we can help the market to harness this potential, we will see additional opportunities for service providers using a variety of technologies. This will ultimately benefit consumers, offering them high quality services and a range of creative applications.”

Other bidders included Arqiva Limited, Vectone Network Limited, MLL Telecom Ltd and The Joint Radio Company.

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 30-May-08 19:08:21
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
At last - news from the Mothership (abridged):

PCCW unveils restructuring plan
By Lorraine Luk, Dow Jones Newswires
29 May 2008
Hong Kong-listed telco also looking at ways to expand its overseas operations.
PCCW Ltd. said Thursday it will combine its telecommunications, media and information-technology systems businesses under a new holding company in a move to improve operational efficiency.
PCCW will invite proposals from investors to buy up to 45% in the holding company to be named HKT Group Holdings Ltd.
"The reorganization...will consolidate all components of the group's quadruple-play offering, comprising a range of innovative media content and services across the four platforms of fixed line, broadband Internet, TV and mobile under a single holding company with a transparent, easily understood corporate structure to faciliate a future listing," it said.
At the company's AGM on Thursday, Chairman Richard Li said the reorganization will also help reduce the company's tax burden, without providing more specific details.
"The proposal should help unlock value for the company," said Kelvin Ho, an analyst at Nomura International Ltd., who rates PCCW "buy."
Li hasn't kept secret his intention to sell his debt-laden telecom assets, which have been subject to cutthroat competition over the past few years amid a flood of new operators that saturated the Hong Kong market.
Li, the son of Hong Kong billionaire Li Ka-shing, acquired Hong Kong's dominant phone company in 2000 in a deal valued at US$28 billion, which was Asia's biggest acquisition at the time.
By early 2001, PCCW's share price had fallen more than 90% from its peak of HK$99.46 in March 2000. Over the past five years, the stock has consistently been trading at about 95% below its peak.
In 2006, Li attracted offers from TPG-Newbridge and Macquarie Bank Ltd. to buy PCCW's main telecommunications and media assets.
But staunch resistance from its second largest shareholder, state-owned China Network Communications Group Corp., as a result of Beijing's concerns the Hong Kong telecom firm would fall into foreign hands, led to him to abandon the deal.
An analyst at a Chinese brokerage, who declined to be named, said the reorganization may make it easier for Li to sell the telecom assets.
Li also said Thursday the telecommunications company is looking at overseas business expansion opportunities because overseas asset prices have been falling in the past few months.
Li said PCCW will announce a new overseas project in the next few weeks, but he declined to disclose details.
Managing Director Alex Arena said:"We will consider all kinds of business opportunities, including acquisitions, a new startup and partnerships" in the Middle East and Asia.
Earlier this year, PCCW, as part of a consortium, won a license to offer fixed-line services in Saudi Arabia.


NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 30-May-08 19:31:17
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
And a pertinent extract from a comment on Ofcoms latest trumpet blast:

The Register
Broadband bumpkins overtake city surfers
By Chris Williams
Published Thursday 22nd May 2008 11:29 GMT

Ofcom is prematurely claiming victory in closing the digital divide today, as its annual review of communications markets reveals that for the first time broadband uptake by country folk has overtaken that of urbanites.
Ofcom may claim it has the regional divide beaten for now, but the issue is certain to rear its ugly head again soon. The foot-dragging that characterised BT's rollout of ADSL to rural exchanges is sure to emerge once more as the UK's lack of a modern fibre to the premises telecoms infrastructure begins to bite.
The former public monopoly is already known to favour a piecemeal approach to fibre, naturally preferring to invest in high density areas where it can flog plenty of lines and services over the top. It's also lobbying hard for regulators to loosen its Universal Service Obligation.
Ofcom and the government have yet to suggest any solution to the small return on investment rural fibre would attract beyond incoherent mumblings about the possibility of a patchwork of wireless services for low density areas... or something.
In the meantime, the UK falls further behind rival better connected nations at a time of huge economic uncertainty, when competition for outside investment will only intensify.

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User kijoma
(learned) Sun 01-Jun-08 19:20:43
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
hi,

I am all in favour of a patchwork of wireless services

To be honest its not fair to imply wireless is only good for "patches" , implying outside these patches the wireline is king and wireless isn't a viable competitor..

could be blowing my own trumpet here of course.. ymmv

new coverage map on www.kijoma.net thanks to google. We are also on Samknows but not listed on think broadband as despite owning and running our entire network we cant claim to have our own central as err we are not an ADSL provider

cheers

Bill Lewis - MD
Kijoma Broadband - (Division of Kijoma Solutions Ltd)
High Speed Wireless broadband ISP
The UK's top rated Wireless ISP 2005 - 2008 - ISP Review
Top 5 finalist in best UK wireless ISP - ISPA's 2008
Members of the Internet Service Providers association (www.ISPA.org.uk)
http://www.kijoma.net
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sun 08-Jun-08 12:00:50
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: kijoma] [link to this post]
 
Good to hear from you Bill, keep on evangelising to the disinherited.
It would be useful to get an update from a Freedom4 user in MK or Slough.
Also, it would be really great if all you NOW users could drop a line with their Postcode, so that a boundary map could be constructed. It can be done using the site checker, but its tedious & time consuming.

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Tue 10-Jun-08 23:02:15
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Slightly cropped, some news about technology progress:-

Six firms plan WiMAX patent pool
By Don Clark, The Wall Street Journal
09 June 2008
Open Patent Alliance designed to prevent high royalty rates; more details expected to emerge Monday.
Six big technology companies are spearheading a plan to jointly license patents that cover the wireless technology called WiMAX hoping to limit royalty rates that could deter customers from using it.

The participants are Cisco Systems Inc., Intel Corp., Samsung Electronics Co., Sprint Nextel Corp., Alcatel-Lucent and Clearwire Corp., according to people familiar with the situation and a document outlining the group's plans.

They have scheduled a conference call Monday to announce an organization, the Open Patent Alliance, to gather rights to WiMAX-related patents and license them to makers of computers, networking devices and other products, these people said.

WiMAX is a long-range cousin of a wireless technology called Wi-Fi that comes with many laptop computers. Intel, which heavily promoted Wi-Fi, has been pushing to make WiMAX another built-in feature of portable PCs. Sprint and Clearwire plan to build a nationwide WiMAX network, while Samsung, Cisco and Alcatel-Lucent are expected to make WiMAX equipment.

But hardware makers could be spooked if patent royalties are too high or the potential costs are uncertain. WiMAX backers cite the case of third-generation cellular networks; companies such as Qualcomm Inc., Nokia Corp. and Telefon AB L.M. Ericsson separately charge patent royalties for 3G products.

Some industry analysts say cellphone makers face cumulative royalties of more than 25% of the price of handsets, unless they have their own patents to help in negotiating lower rates. One person familiar with the thinking of the WiMAX alliance said it hopes to license WiMAX patents at "much lower" rates.

Such patent pools aren't a new idea. A group called MPEG LA, for example, offers standard royalty rates for licensing patents associated with video compression. Patent pools are "tremendously important," said David Balto, a Washington, D.C., lawyer who handles patent and antitrust issues.

But the WiMAX alliance, which was reported by Computerworld Friday, faces several challenges. One is a competing standard -- known as LTE, for long-range evolution -- that shares a common technical foundation with WiMAX and is expected to be preferred by many cellular carriers.

And some holders of patents related to WiMAX and LTE -- including Motorola Inc. and Qualcomm -- haven't joined the patent pool and could continue to make their own claims for royalty payments.

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 13-Jun-08 18:05:52
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Fresh off ISP Review (who presumably are the 'we')

13 June, 2008 - 9:26 AM
WiMAX Threatens Fixed & Mobile Broadband Providers
The latest research from In-Stat has predicted that future WiMAX broadband wireless services will threaten established fixed and mobile broadband providers, though we've yet to see much practical evidence for this.

Based on survey data collected by In-Stat, WiMAX should provide the right mix of features and pricing to appeal to consumers. Business users on the other hand will prove more of a challenge to WiMAX operators, primarily based on the business users need for ubiquitous coverage:

“While early WiMAX network coverage will not be as large as 3G cellular, it will be adequate to appeal to consumers,” says Daryl Schoolar, In-Stat analyst. “When respondents were presented with service examples and picked the one they most preferred, the one representing WiMAX was picked more than two-to-one over the one representing 3G cellular data. Service descriptions include information on coverage, network performance, pricing, and usage limitations.”

We’re of the growing belief that, unless a raft of UK mobile operators decide to adopt WiMAX, it is likely to remain a niche technology in our local market.

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Wed 18-Jun-08 11:25:54
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Darn! I missed this great anarchist post passed on, not too late I hope, for your delectation:-

May 30th, 2008
STOP THE SPECTRUM AUCTION MADNESS
Before one more colleague speculates on rules for spectrum auctions, can I make one suggestion?
Stop.
Over the last several years we’ve had auction-after-auction, all ostensibly designed to provide competition to the Wireless Trust.
Has it? No, it hasn’t. The Trust remains intact. The benefits of Moore’s Law which have impacted our PCs and our hard drives and our iPods and everything else somehow haven’t filtered down to wireless service. It’s been stopped cold.
The reason is simple. The Wireless Trust and the government are conspiring to maintain the status quo, through spectrum auctions. It’s policy.
Policy can change.
When a company pays billions of dollars for a monopoly on the use of spectrum, it can only get that money back by charging you a lot of money to use it
That money is a tax, a spectrum tax, one you pay on every phone call you make, and every ringtone you download.

But it’s your spectrum. Yours and mine. The electromagnetic spectrum is not government property, and need not be private property. It is supposed to be regulated by the government in the public interest, to prevent interference.
But we can engineer hardware to prevent interference. We don’t need government mandates on who can use the spectrum. We need government standards for hardware to enforce simple rules.

Look at how WiFi speeds have increased this decade, from 10 mbps 802.11b to 100 mbps 802.11n. Look at what’s available through WiMax.

Open, shared spectrum need not be full of interference. You write rules, you implement them in hardware, the hardware makers compete, and the next thing you know everyone’s sitting in coffee shops watching a cat play the piano on YouTube.

Write non-interference rules into a national network of shared spectrum, implement them in hardware, and we’ll have dozens of networks competing for customers, just as we used to have thousands of ISPs before the government made that a duopoly.
And if the Trust which “paid so dearly” for spectrum howls, buy that spectrum back. At cost.
Open spectrum can break the monopoly and bring us all the benefits of Moore’s Law. That’s why the government, and the monopoly, are so anxious to prevent any new open spectrum from appearing, and auctioning off every bit of spectrum that’s left.
Stop.
Dana Blankenhorn has been a business journalist for 30 years, a tech freelancer since 1983.


NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 23-Jun-08 22:07:54
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Currently there is an armfull of negative vibes being circulated on the news channels, so here's a couple of positives.
From The Times (Edited)
June 21, 2008
Maidstone to run pioneer trial of mobile WiMAX
Lilly Peel

Maidstone, Kent will become the first place in Britain to trial mobile WiMAX, the latest phase of next-generation on-the-go web surfing. The wireless broadband technology has been described as “wi-fi on steroids” and has a range of up to 25 miles, compared with the mere 100ft radius that wi-fi offers.

The Maidstone pilot, a collaboration between the Mobile WiMAX Acceleration Group (MWAG) and Maidstone Borough Council, will test services such as internet tele-phony, real-time video streaming and live broadcast and experiment with running the council's CCTV over the network.
In consumer trials, 50 students will be given data cards, loaded with virtual cash, to let them connect their laptops to the WiMAX network and allow them to buy music and other content online. Mr Kerl Haslam, chairman of MWAG, hopes to target consumers who want access to high-speed internet but cannot afford a monthly contract.
Mobile WiMAX is similar to using a mobile nework and differs from networks using earlier WiMAX technology that is being rolled out in the UK by wireless internet provider Freedom4, which required users to be stationary.
WiMAX has yet to take off despite being touted for some time as the next big thing. It is considered a potential threat to mobile operators, which hope data use will boost falling voice and text revenue.
Last year WiMAX Forum, the industry body, estimated that 3.6 million people worldwide used the service, a fraction of the 200 million users of third-generation mobile networks.

However, roll-out of the technology appears to be gaining pace and the forum forecasts 100 million subscribers by 2012. In the past week, the world's first commercial mobile WiMAX network went live in Amsterdam; Sprint, a US mobile network, said it would deploy its WiMAX arm in September and regional WiMAX licences went on sale in France.
The Maidstone trial, which will cover an area of 7.5km from the town centre and deliver download speeds of up to 10MB per second, hopes to prove that there is a viable business model for the technology before Ofcom's much-anticipated 2.6 gigahertz spectrum auction, which is due to take place towards the end of the year.

As well as offering airwaves suitable for mobile television and the next-generation, long term evolution technology (LTE), the auction is seen as the best chance for a WiMAX operator to gain a national licence in a main European economy.
Mr Haslam, expects it to complement rather than compete with existing networks. “WiMAX has the opportunity to get established. We can offer affordable mobile broadband as WiMAX transmits more data at a lower cost.

“The networks are cheaper to build than mobile networks and can plug the gaps in rural broadband coverage as WiMAX can reach places that are underserved by optic fibre.”



NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 23-Jun-08 22:11:22
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Redline Wins French WiMAX Contract

Redline Communications has announced that France based Nomotech has selected its WiMAX Forum Certified RedMAX products for its US$5 million broadband wireless network expansion. Nomotech will deploy Redline’s RedMAX products to establish a WiMAX network that will cover more than 1000 regions and municipalities in Brittany and Pyrenees, and will deliver broadband wireless services to businesses and residents throughout the area. Nomotech’s West Telecom & Idyle Telecom business units will manage subscriptions and deliver services to the end-users.

Nomotech began the initial phase of its WiMAX network in May 2008 in North Brittany and Pyrenees regions, and will expand to cover Brittany in 2009 and 2010.

Nomotech is actively involved in France’s nationwide efforts to bring digital services to more regions across the country, and has helped carriers across Europe and Africa to expand their networks with wireless technologies.

“Nomotech is recognized as a pioneer in wireless networking, with proven success in planning, deploying and operating advanced communications networks,” said Kevin Suitor, Vice President, Marketing and Business Development, Redline Communications Inc. “Redline’s proven RedMAX family, with its reliable high-speed connections and ability to support thousands of users per base station, ensures that Nomotech can quickly deliver the most advanced broadband services to in these key French territories.”

Posted to the cellular-news .com site on 23rd June 2008

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sat 28-Jun-08 12:33:09
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Latest results of trawling tha airwaves in 1st of 2 posts :

Vodafone Dreams of Metro Femto
25 June 2008
Michelle Donegan European Editor – Unstrung

Femtocells could one day proliferate in metropolitan areas at bus stops, on lamp posts, or on buildings, if Vodafone Group plc vision for a hotspot deployment of femto access points becomes reality.
The giant mobile operator's head of new technologies and innovation, Kenny Graham, proposed taking the mini home base stations out of the home/office and onto the streets at the Femtocells Europe 2008 conference in London Wednesday morning.

Graham reckons the same attributes that make femtocells ideal for deployment in homes and offices -– localized coverage, improved performance, self-configuration, self-optimization, and low cost -– can be of use outside, too. He dubbed this kind of deployment a “metrozone.”
Operators would get the same benefits of increased capacity and better coverage at a lower cost, compared to deploying more macro cell sites, believes Graham.
”Longer term, you can… get a contiguous network of access points,” he said. “If you create this layer of access points, you will deliver a step change in performance.

”We’ve talked about mesh, software-defined radio, self-organized networks, and base stations on lamp posts for years,” he reminded his audience. “All these technologies were concepts some time ago. The metro access point [femtocell] could bring these things together to improve performance for the outdoor environment.”

But while this all sounds intriguing, Graham admitted the idea faces a lot of challenges. One of the biggest issues with a metro femto deployment is backhaul. How would an operator backhaul traffic from all those little base stations?
As to the timing of when such an outdoor femto deployment might be practical, he said it could be three years from now, or even longer: The "metrozone" concept seems more appropriate for the so-called 4G technology, (LTE), he added.

For now, though, Vodafone is testing femtocells for the home environment.
”Today, the focus is on the home,” said Graham. “We have to get that working right first. Then, we can start looking to the future and set a path for access points in the future.”



NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sat 28-Jun-08 12:47:28
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
In a similar vein, Ars Technica provided the 2nd item from the US:

Comcast gets spectrum for WiMAX femtocells, wireless services

By Ari Allyn-Feuer | Published: June 26, 2008 - 08:45AM CT

One typically thinks of WiMAX as a wireless technology useful mainly for large, citywide networks and widescale broadband deployment. But, if the Clearwire Broadband consortium has its way, the networking tech will be widely deployed in any home with cable internet connections. The group's new agreement on the use of its massive spectrum allotment sets aside 5Mhz of spectrum across the US solely for use by WiMAX Femtocells. This set-aside appears to have been primarily advocated by Comcast and the other cable Internet companies in the group, as it's not clear what the other members of the group get out of it.

The Clearwire Consortium formed as a merger between wireless ISPs Clearwire and Sprint's Xohm division, with an infusion of cash from a number of other firms, including Comcast, Time Warner and Google, which bought shares of the new venture. The consortium owns a large amount of spectrum bandwidth all over the United States, and the new decision sets aside a significant chunk of it for the exclusive use of Femtocell devices.
Recent years have seen a lot of news and hype about cell network femtocells, small and cheap devices which provide wireless access to a small number of cellular devices in a small area, typically indoors or underground. Their limitations include contention and interference problems with larger towers covering the same area. WiMAX is faster and has the potential to be more effective for applications like internet access on a wider variety of devices, but the cells have typically been large and expensive. The new spectrum allocation should spur the development of WiMAX femtocells and, with a chunk of spectrum specifically dedicated to them, interference problems should be reduced or eliminated.

Comcast has announced plans to deploy these Femtocells via its cable internet subscribers. These small and cheap devices will provide wireless access to subscriber's houses with backhaul going through their Comcast Internet connections. The Femtocells would reportedly provide longer range than WiFi, with a speed in the neighborhood of 8Mbit/s. Although WiFi is well entrenched in small-cell wireless, WiMAX femtocells have a number of notable advantages over WiFi for home applications, which may help the new technology gain traction.
Although WiMAX uses registered spectrum, devices use the spectrum more efficiently, providing more bandwidth overall. Also, bandwidth and latency guarantees are stronger in the WiMAX protocol, potentially allowing greater reliability for sensitive applications like VoIP. The WiMAX connection provided by the cells could interface seamlessly with larger-scale citywide networks, which WiFi cannot do. This would allow Comcast to route wireless services through their own backhaul infrastructure as much as possible, saving them money and allowing for cheaper in-home access to these services for consumers.

The reserved block of spectrum is technically open to Femtocell use by all the members of the Clearwire consortium, but it appears likely the primary users will be the cable companies. The biggest advantage of WiMAX for large-area deployments is its range; WiFi deployments have been hindered by prohibitive expense due to unexpectedly large numbers of access points needed to effectively blanket large areas. Providers like Sprint, when trying to cover large cities with wireless, probably won't want to deploy lots of small cells, even with the interference problem solved. Although the small cells can allow indoor access, which is frequently problematic with existing networks, carriers of large networks probably won't think it's worth the expense. Indeed, Comcast's Dave Williams referred to the spectrum assignment as a "hard-won" concession, and said Comcast "would have liked more [spectrum]" to allow for greater bandwidth. Other players in the consortium apparently just aren't as interested.
Home deployment of WiMAX Femtocells could ease the costs of infrastructure installment, solve indoor access difficulties, and offer cheap access to seamless wireless services to consumers. Comcast will need to see good performance and rapidly-falling prices if their planned deployments are going to make economic sense. They're also going to have to hope that consumer devices will emerge to make use of the new networking system. Apparently, they're optimistic, as Comcast now sees Femtocells as "absolutely key to WiMAX."

NOW Wireless Internet Support is Free
Standard User yarwell
(sensei) Sun 29-Jun-08 16:24:58
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
In reply to:

The wireless broadband technology has been described as “wi-fi on steroids” and has a range of up to 25 miles, compared with the mere 100ft radius that wi-fi offers.


At this point you realise you have entered the bovine scatology department.

WiMax has to live in the same frequency range with the same power ratings as any other form of wireless, you can do a 4km link with 802.11b and more with 802.11a.

Phil

666 kbytes/s with Demon predominantly over fibre

MaxDSL diagnostics
Get all this Microsoft Lame! stuff off my PC !
Standard User kijoma
(learned) Tue 01-Jul-08 23:37:46
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: yarwell] [link to this post]
 
hi,

Wimax is a great name but its speeds will be limited as the aggregate bandwidth of a cell looks good until you divide it down and take into account its round robin algorithm.

We have point to point links with over 100 Mbps of capacity (TCP) running over 20+ km, point to multipoint covering 25+ km over a 120 degree arc with speeds in excess of 10 Mbps per client.

None of this is wimax, all of it is secure and interference free without the need for trellis masts etc..

<advert> see http://www.kijoma.net/tiki-index.php?page=where for coverage </advert>,

clue, you have more fingers than there are aerials feeding that total area!.

cheers



Bill Lewis - MD
Kijoma Broadband - (Division of Kijoma Solutions Ltd)
High Speed Wireless broadband ISP
The UK's top rated Wireless ISP 2005 - 2008 - ISP Review
Top 5 finalist in best UK wireless ISP - ISPA's 2008
Members of the Internet Service Providers association (www.ISPA.org.uk)
http://www.kijoma.net
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Thu 03-Jul-08 12:47:29
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Copying and pasting without giving a link back is poor netiquette

Andrew Ferguson, andrew@thinkbroadband.com
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 04-Jul-08 10:08:42
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Agreed sir, but from an archival point of view and experience, many of these items have only a very short shelf life.

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User dslamdunk
(learned) Fri 04-Jul-08 21:06:56
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: yarwell] [link to this post]
 
>>WiMax has to live in the same frequency range with the same power ratings as any other form of wireless


I thought it could be used with licences which allow much higher power ratings? (than say 5.8GHz band)
i.e. in protected specturm. Wasnt it recently auctioned?

Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Fri 04-Jul-08 23:43:45
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Even so I thrown upon and some sites themselves do not like their content being copied and pasted without reasonable linkage

Andrew Ferguson, andrew@thinkbroadband.com
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User kijoma
(learned) Sat 05-Jul-08 15:40:24
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
hi,

in my experience technologies full of hypermarketing such as WiMax also have a similar short shelf life.

i see the gumf saying a wimax base stating can do 10's of mb/sec!, yeah like 3G can do uber speeds if you were the only cilent using all the slots on the base station with no backhaul contention etc..

same with Wimax, get a few hundred on a mast to make it financially viable with the licence costs etc.. and you have contention hell and sloooow speeds..

in response to power levels, WiMax is not allowed any more EIRP (radiated) power than 5.8 Ghz systems so its range is no greater than those systems in reality.

Difference is Wimax people have a lot of money to recover for the licences, marketing and hyper priced equipment.

The rest of us can concentrate on actually providing a service.



Bill Lewis - MD
Kijoma Broadband - (Division of Kijoma Solutions Ltd)
High Speed Wireless broadband ISP
The UK's top rated Wireless ISP 2005 - 2008 - ISP Review
Top 5 finalist in best UK wireless ISP - ISPA's 2008
Members of the Internet Service Providers association (www.ISPA.org.uk)
http://www.kijoma.net
Standard User kijoma
(learned) Sat 05-Jul-08 15:43:01
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
hi ,

question for Mr saffron, how does an ISP get listed on Think Broadband?

never seem to get a reply to any emails i have sent to you / others there.

Cheers

Bill Lewis - MD
Kijoma Broadband - (Division of Kijoma Solutions Ltd)
High Speed Wireless broadband ISP
The UK's top rated Wireless ISP 2005 - 2008 - ISP Review
Top 5 finalist in best UK wireless ISP - ISPA's 2008
Members of the Internet Service Providers association (www.ISPA.org.uk)
http://www.kijoma.net
Standard User yarwell
(sensei) Sat 05-Jul-08 20:06:08
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: dslamdunk] [link to this post]
 
In reply to:

I thought it could be used with licences which allow much higher power ratings?


So can any other form of encoding, hence it's not a unique advantage of WiMax per se.

Phil

666 kbytes/s with Demon predominantly over fibre

MaxDSL diagnostics
Get all this Microsoft Lame! stuff off my PC !
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Sat 05-Jul-08 21:57:58
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: kijoma] [link to this post]
 
John should handle them - if you have emailed him, then email me a copy of what you sent and I'll prod with a pointy stick

Andrew Ferguson, andrew@thinkbroadband.com
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Mon 21-Jul-08 22:12:02
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: brokenarrow] [link to this post]
 
So what's the latest news with Wireless Broadband in London?

NOW respond with LATER, but will give no idea of how later LATER will be, and I can't find any other company offering a Wireless Broadband in the Capital.

Has everyone really given up because they can't keep up the ADSL pricing or speed or is there something else going on just around the corner?

Any ideas anyone?
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Tue 22-Jul-08 11:36:17
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
Very little demand for wireless in urban areas - sometimes I think I'm the sole customer, contention issues may disprove this theory.
I made an assumption that WiMax would Be the Nextstep, although expert concensus may indicate that LTE has more clout.
Latest from owner Mr Li in HK, is that he is seeking to raise additional funds by inviting bids for partners in PCCW.
Ofcom, the Regulator is disinterested.
As for myself, its summer at last & taking a holiday.

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Wed 23-Jul-08 11:39:10
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Thanks for your reply RadioJack. It may have more to do with little availability, rather than little
demand.

As the only vocal NOW customer, could you advise when they start talking about migrated you over to WiMAX? They won't take new customers until they're migrated the 14,000 or so customers they already have on WiFi first. Then there's at least a chance for us wannabes after that.

WiMAX seems like it's closer to reality for London homes, rather than LTE.

[LTE global conference in Nov 2008]
http://www.osimworld.com/newt/l/networkevolution/lte08/

Enjoy your holiday!
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 01-Aug-08 22:12:40
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
I learned today that UK Broadband's trials are progressing well and the future service will indeed be WiMAX.

This extract from an article in yesterday's Guardian http://tinyurl.co.uk/2dc8 is remarkably bullish about this particular flavour of 4G, in contrast to all the recent adverse publicity:-

"The one thing that could make Centrino 2 revolutionary is its support for WiMax, or Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, the 802.16 standard. This is, to put it crudely, a long-range version of 802.11 Wi-Fi. One of its aims is to deliver broadband speeds - perhaps 10Mbps - to mobile users. Wi-Fi works over metres, whereas WiMax works over kilometres.
However, Mobile WiMax will only become compelling when two things happen. The first, expected "later this year", is the release of Intel's Echo Peak - the codename for a card that supports both W-Fi and WiMax. This could make WiMax as common as Wi-Fi is today. The second thing is the arrival of WiMax services.
If you live in the US, you can be reasonably hopeful about both of those things. If you live in the UK, you may not get either in the near future. According to the WiMax Forum, "currently there are more than 305 deployments of WiMax services in 118 countries worldwide". Some are being rolled out in the UK - one is in Milton Keynes - but most mobile users will probably have to wait until Ofcom auctions its "4G" spectrum and the winner(s) get round to installing transmitters and developing service platforms.
I think WiMax should be a global standard, like GSM. However, Ofcom is selling off our 2.6GHz wireless spectrum on "a technology and service neutral basis". This means phone companies will be able to buy it and use it for something else - such as LTE or Long Term Evolution - instead of WiMax.
LTE, the next version of 3G telephony, is still under development and won't appear for years.
This doesn't mean WiMax is doomed. I've already seen an LG home router that provides both Wi-Fi and WiMax, and cybercafes could adopt them. With WiMax, you should have no problem getting broadband in your garden, or several streets away."



NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 06-Aug-08 08:43:41
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
I wish GSM was a global standard, try using a GSM phone outside the big dozen cities in the US

Andrew Ferguson, andrew@thinkbroadband.com
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 15-Aug-08 19:00:06
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Latest auction news, yet more delay.
From The Register http://tinyurl.com/66j9ht

Ofcom Knocks Back Spectrum Auction

T-Mobile and O2 still fighting their corner

By Bill Ray
Published Thursday 14th August 2008 15:37 GMT

Ofcom has admitted it will not start the auction of three chunks of 2GHz spectrum in October as promised, pushing the date back as litigation from T-Mobile and O2 drags on.
The incumbent operators are not saying much in public, but the argument is over how Ofcom wants to sell three sections of spectrum around 2GHz (2010-2025MHz, 2290-2302MHz & 2500-2690MHz), before deciding what to do about refarming 900MHz. A decision on the latter will have a significant impact on the value of the frequencies on offer.
Right now the 900MHz band is only licensed for 2G GSM services, but everyone who owns a chunk of 900MHz has been pushing to use other technologies, such as 3G and LTE. The GSMA backs the campaign, claiming that an extra 300 million people could enjoy 3G connectivity if it were allowed onto 900MHz.
Ofcom is happy to allow that - probably - but won't make a formal decision on the matter until next year.
The operators want to know if they'll be allowed to deploy LTE, GSM's fourth generation technology of choice, at 900MHz before they decide if it is worth bidding for some 2GHz.
O2's position is that Ofcom should auction off the middle chunk of spectrum, 2290MHz to 2302MHz, but hang on to the rest until a decision is made on 900MHz, while T-Mobile wants to see the whole lot delayed until the operators know where they stand.
A true cynic might also note that T-Mobile's position prevents anyone deploying WiMAX, a technology that likes to paint itself as a competitor to LTE, while the final details of the LTE standard are thrashed out. T-Mobile is committed to LTE, so even if the spectrum were available tomorrow they wouldn't be able to roll out a network for a while yet, so any delay can only work in their favour.®

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 25-Aug-08 12:18:17
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
NOW Wireless B/band guys should note the frequent refs. to 3.5GHz.

The WiMax State of Play in the USA
AUGUST 22, 2008

It's 2008. Is WiMax OK across the USA?
Not quite. The partnership of Clearwire LLC and Sprint Nextel Corp. could be the main driver for the technology in the U.S., but the companies haven't delivered commercial WiMax networks yet. That doesn't mean that other operators aren't planning -- and in a few cases, actually going live with -- WiMax in America.

Just this week, Pipeline Wireless LLC announced it will launch a WiMax network in downtown Boston in the next few months. The company, which hs a nationwide license for 3.5 GHz services, is using base stations from Redline Communications Inc. to deploy the network.

Meanwhile, Nth Air Inc. is pushing fixed WiMax at businesses in the San Jose metro area and attendees of the Democratic National Convention in Denver. Nth Air is using 3.65 GHz WiMax network kit from Fujitsu Ltd. for its deployments. The operator also has a nationwide license but says that it will target "underserved markets" with its networks.

NextPhase Wireless Inc. approached the Federal Communications Commission earlier this month to register a licensed WiMax base station in Anaheim, Calif. It plans to cover Orange County with WiMax and has similar ambitions for Philadelphia and New Jersey.

The Southern California operator also has a nationwide license to deploy 802.16e WiMax services in the 3.65 GHz band. It is using base stations from Aperto Networks Inc. for the task.

Some operators have gotten past the planning stage and actually have WiMax networks up and running. TowerStream Corp. has offered fixed WiMax for business users in New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, and other major markets in the U.S. for more than a year now.

Meanwhile, DigitalBridge Communications Corp. earned the distinction of being the first operator to deploy true mobile WiMax in Jackson Hole, Wyo. this June. The operator has already deployed a number of fixed WiMax networks in smaller towns around the country.

Sprint and Clearwire, the perceived prime movers in the mobile WiMax game, still haven't gone commercial, although Clearwire does have a sizable fixed wireless network using so-called "pre-WiMax" gear.

Sprint says its first mobile WiMax network will go live in Baltimore in September. The operator is promising monthly prices of $50 or less and options such as a day pass for sometime users.

For Clearwire, a lot hinges on the Sprint deal -- and the associated $3.2 billion funding -- getting done. The company maintains that the WiMax asset merger should close in the fourth quarter of this year, which is also when it expects to deploy its first mobile WiMax network in Portland, Ore.

Dan Jones, Site Editor, Unstrung (edited version)
http://www.unstrung.com/document.asp?doc_id=162200

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Thu 28-Aug-08 17:53:46
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
It just had to happen - caught my foot in the UTStarcom modem wire this morning. It crashed to the boards, the aerial hanging limp... £75 outa pocket?
Take heart fellow users (if there are any) I pushed it back into the socket and she fired up, having survived a drop test seemingly intact.

Ever curious to probe the future, I Googled WiMAx in London and found the following recent report:

NEED To KNOW: WiMAX
Our monthly guide to up-and-coming technologies looks at WiMax
Written by Dave Bailey
COMPUTING 06 Aug 2008

What is WiMax?

WiMax stands for worldwide interoperability for microwave access, a term describing a wireless broadband technology, which is derived from the industry-led organisation the WiMax Forum, and based on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 wireless metropolitan area network and European Telecommunications Standards Institute HiperMAN standards.

What is the current status of the more important IEEE 802.16 standard?

In December 2005, the IEEE announced the approval of amendment 802.16e of the standard, which would support both fixed clients and moving clients at vehicular speeds.

Headline downlink speeds have been touted as a maximum 70Mbit/s, with a maximum range of 50km, but not simultaneously. Ultimately speeds and range will be a fraction of the above, because of a dependence on the radio spectrum available usually under 6GHz the number of clients and the speed they require.

Can I buy WiMax equipment now?

Certified WiMax hardware is available now, but mass WiMax adoption is expected to follow the WiFi model, whereby embedded client hardware, especially in laptops, drove adoption.

What are the cost and benefit implications?

The key for users is service pricing. WiMax providers are touting the costs of rolling out WiMax networks as significantly less than today’s cellular networks.

Besides price, the other benefit would be the potential for faster uplink and downlink speeds than those available with current 3G mobile phone networks.

What is WiMax’s future in the UK?

In developed countries with mature wired networks such as the UK, which also has a large 3G wireless broadband footprint, WiMax rollouts could struggle to prove a business case.

Problems include availability of radio spectrum, mast sites and client devices. The important radio spectrum auction, which should make countrywide WiMax frequencies available, will take place before the end of the year, under the auspices of regulator Ofcom. Intel will embed WiMax hardware in variants of its upcoming Centrino 2 platform, but the UK is not the primary market.

Key WiMax technology players and current deployments

WiMax vendors include Alvarion, AirSpan, Intel and Nortel. Current WiMax deployments and trials include: Urban WiMax in London, UK Broadband in the Thames Valley, Freedom4 in Manchester, Milton Keynes and Warwick, and the Mobile WiMax Acceleration Group in Maidstone.
At - http://tinyurl.com/68h3by

No reason to get excited yet then and certainly no mention of UK Broadband because its proposals for NOW are still secret.





NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Thu 28-Aug-08 18:45:55
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Latest on PCCW re-capitalisation - found at RAPID TVNews http://tinyurl.com/6sx4bt

Shortlist Drawn up for PCCW Offshoot

Rose Major 24-08-2008

Three private equity groups plus Australian bank Macquarie Group are among the bidders reportedly shortlisted for a 45% stake in HKT Holdings, an offshoot of Hong Kong telco PCCW. 
Providence Equity Partners, MBK Partners and TPG Capital are still in the running for the stake, but Blackstone Group is reportedly off the list. It is not known whether Apax Partners, Carlyle Group and Bain Capital are still in the race.

PCCW wants to maintain an investment-grade rating on the unit so the winning bidder will have to finance the deal using as much cash as possible, rather than debt.

Among the assets PCCW is folding into the new unit is the Now TV IPTV platform. The winning bidder is expected to be announced by the end of October.

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 05-Sep-08 23:27:51
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Here's a story (edited) I missed:

BT Suffers as Ofcom Delays 2.6GHz Auctions
AUGUST 11, 2008

There's not much doubt as to who suffers most from Ofcom's decision to push out the start of the U.K.'s 2.6GHz auction process yet again. There are likely to be several contenders for the spectrum, but only one that can make a really big impact on the U.K. mobile broadband market.

BT has the dubious distinction of being the only major incumbent telco in the western world that doesn't have a 2G or 3G license. It has had several shots at shoehorning other wireless technologies into competing with cellular. For those with long memories, there was CT2/Telepoint in the early 1990s, followed by dualmode DECT/GSM in 1998. Both crashed and burned.

More recently, BT has floundered on with dualmode "Fusion," combining a cellular MVNO proposition with in-building coverage based first on Bluetooth, now WiFi. BT Open Zone is competitive enough as a WiFI hotspot service, but nothing special compared with the WiFi coverage that many other cellular operators also offer as a complement to their 3G service. The most recent "Digital Cities" effort to deploy wide-area WiFi has failed to capture the imagination of consumers or investors, and is unlikely to take much more than a splinter of the U.K.'s mobile broadband revenue opportunity.

Hence the cruelty of this latest delay in the 2.6GHz auction. In WiMax, BT has at its disposal a technology with which it can finally give the 3G operators a genuine run for their money. Rolling out a nationwide WiMax network has been a key strategic objective of BT's for some time. The organization is all set to go. The WiMax infrastructure vendors are raring to go as well: The BT opportunity was likely a significant factor behind Alvarion Ltd.'s OEM agreement with Nortel Networks Ltd. for example. All that's needed now is a license at 2.6GHz, and it's a reasonable bet that BT will bid "whatever is necessary" whenever the auction is finally held.

While the additional delay is certainly cruel from BT's perspective, that doesn't mean it's unjustified. Of course, the 3G operators are filibustering; but there is also some substance to their filibustering. In particular, the cellular operators object that they can't accurately value the 2.6GHz spectrum until they have greater clarity on the future of their 900MHz GSM licences, and their rights to re-farm the 900MHz spectrum for W-CDMA or LTE (Long-Term Evolution).

As I showed in my recent Heavy Reading report, "3G Squeeze: GSM, LTE & the Future of W-CDMA" http://tinyurl.com/5kaj53 the real-world cost savings that can be achieved by a mature operator re-farming the 900MHz spectrum for W-CDMA – taking full account of operational costs to the operator on the ground – are quite a lot less in practice than in theory. And in that ongoing analysis by Ofcom and other industry players lies a key source of the delay in the auction and BT's continued isolation at the margins of the mobile broadband market.

Patrick Donegan, Senior Analyst, Wireless, Heavy Reading
http://tinyurl.com/5qgzch


NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 08-Sep-08 21:21:18
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Edited news item just in:-

OPERATORS EYE WIMAX FEMTOS
08.09.08

Femtocells could play a major role in ensuring mobile WiMax operators deliver on the promise of high-speed data services in densely populated urban areas, according to a new Unstrung Insider report.
But while many service providers have WiMax home base stations on the drawing board, most vendors take a wait-and-see approach to the technology for now.

One of the main reasons for WiMax operators to consider femtocells is the potential to reduce backhaul costs on the macro network.
The report notes that a three-sector, 5 MHz WiMax channel carrier would require about 90 Mbit/s of backhaul capacity. The small home base stations, by contrast, use the customers' broadband connections to backhaul traffic back to the core network.

Comcast's senior VP for wireless and technology, Dave Williams, said in June that a key element of the new Clearwire deal is that 5 MHz of spectrum will be set aside just for WiMax femtocell deployments and be available for use by any of the consortium members,
With a WiMax femtocell deployment, Comcast could sidestep the wholesale charges it would have to pay for capacity on the new Clearwire WiMax network. So, it clearly has a vested interest in femtos.
Comcast and the Clearwire consortium could be among the biggest drivers of the development of mobile WiMax femto equipment.

For now, though, big vendors like Nokia Siemens Networks have not yet committed to WiMax femtocells, according to the report, and are waiting for the right amount of demand to kick in.

While WiMax operators and vendors continue to evaluate the potential of femtocells, the price pressure and competition among WiMax macro base station equipment is fierce, finds the report.
"Vendors are willing to eat their margins to make a sale and reduce the price premium over cellular," writes report author Tim Kridel, noting that prices have fallen dramatically over the last several months.

In theory, WiMax base stations should cost 50 percent more than cellular 3G base stations because it is a newer technology and, with the use of multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) technology, WiMax base stations use more radios, power amplifiers, and antennas. But the report finds that this is not the case and that cellular 3G and WiMax base stations are actually comparable in price. That means vendors are likely struggling to make much of a profit on this equipment.

The report concludes: "Unless a killer application is found, mobile WiMax must be insanely great… So, to grab market shares from cellular, mobile WiMax must create the perception among consumers and enterprises that it is better [e.g., lower latency], faster, cheaper, or some combination of the three."

Michelle Donegan, European Editor, Unstrung

http://www.unstrung.com/document.asp?doc_id=163140

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Tue 09-Sep-08 11:35:07
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WiMAX clearly making progress NOW - take note! And offering a possible solution for our deprived country cousins (ref. latest t/b headline story). If its good enough for the 3rd World, surely UK can afford it:-

Alcatel-Lucent and Motorola Runaway Leaders in Mobile WiMAX Market

As of the second quarter of 2008, Alcatel-Lucent and Motorola together account for over two-thirds of worldwide mobile WiMAX equipment revenue, according to communications market research firm Infonetics Research in a new report. Just one quarter ago, the two market leaders captured roughly half the worldwide market.

The report says Alvarion continues as the clear leader in fixed WiMAX, garnering roughly a quarter of the worldwide market in 2Q08.

However, "The big WiMAX story of the quarter is the huge ramp-up in mobile WiMAX equipment revenues by Alcatel-Lucent, which more than doubled its revenue in 2Q08; Motorola posted a hefty increase as well. ALU's gain was due mainly to a dramatic increase in access service network (ASN) gateway shipments, having shipped more than six times its nearest rival, Motorola. These shipments make ALU the first major integrated vendor to reap the rewards of an 'open WiMAX' policy, a policy that enables vendors to sell ASN gateways into networks where they are not necessarily the base station vendor," said Richard Webb, wireless analyst for Infonetics Research.

Other highlights from the report:
• Worldwide fixed and mobile WiMAX equipment revenue topped $402 million in 2Q08, up 3% from 1Q08
• As the overall WiMAX market continues to gain momentum, double- digit quarterly sequential revenue growth will continue through 2008 as more WiMAX networks are rolled out and scaled up
• WiMAX is gaining traction, with more than 200 networks now being deployed and more than 100 other trials in progress; the market will be increasingly driven by more Tier 1 operators entering the market
• Developing countries are the engine for WiMAX market growth, with Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Africa, Central and Latin America, and parts of the Asia Pacific being hot-beds of activity. In particular, India, Russia and Brazil are fast- moving markets with numerous active WiMAX operators and large populations and market conditions to give potential for strong growth
• The number of fixed and mobile WiMAX subscribers topped 2 million worldwide in 2007 and is expected to triple by the end of 2008.

Posted to the site http://www.cellular-news.com/story/33499.php on 8th September 2008


NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Thu 11-Sep-08 09:33:27
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Rural France gets it:-

ALTITUDE INFRASTRUCTURE SELECTS DRAGONWAVE TO SUPPORT WIMAX GROWTH

DragonWave’s success demonstrates IP Backhaul continues to be the preferred solution for WiMAX Operators

9/9/08 - Ottawa, Canada

DragonWave Inc. a leading global supplier of next-generation point to point microwave radio systems, today announced that Altitude Infrastructure, a subsidiary of Altitude Group, has selected DragonWave products to provide high capacity Ethernet backhaul as part of its rollout of WiMAX broadband services across France.

Altitude has pioneered WiMAX service introduction in France. Its first deployments took place in 2004. To date, DragonWave’s Ethernet backhaul solution has been selected for four regional deployments in the Département de la Haute Garonne, Département des Deux Sèvres, Département du Jura and Département des Pyrénées Atlantiques.

“WiMAX has matured beyond the developmental stage. Today it is being selected as a legitimate broadband access option by more and more French customers. To accommodate this growth we required the highest performance IP backhaul solution available.” said Fabrice Ballart, Directeur Général with Altitude Infrastructure. “A broad portfolio of frequency options provides the flexibility we need to introduce WiMAX in any region. Its superior payload-per-hertz efficiency means we can optimize our spectrum usage and overall backhaul investment without compromising the end user experience. These benefits have helped fuel our business and provide a better return on network investments.”

Customer uptake in Altitude Telecom’s services has intensified across business and residential markets. The operator recently announced it is accepting hundreds of new orders per month and this year plans to double the number of base stations in its WiMAX network to six hundred.

Altitude Infrastructure is deploying DragonWave's AirPair products operating in licensed frequencies between 6 and 38 GHz. These products ensure interference-free performance, ultra-low latency to support real-time services, and scaleable Ethernet connectivity up to 800 Mbps. Extremely easy to deploy and manage, DragonWave products come with a full suite of network management options, and can be engineered to provide 99.999% service availability.

The deployment expands DragonWave’s growing market presence in Europe. “Operators in more and more markets are validating our IP backhaul solutions as the state-of-the-art, high-capacity transport option for 3G and 4G base stations,” said Peter Allen, president and CEO of DragonWave. “We will continue to work closely with Altitude to assist in its expansion plans in France and with WiMAX operators throughout Europe and other international markets.”

Altitude Telecom
The Altitude Group, wholly owned by its founder Jean-Paul Riviere, is a major French telecoms organization. With its subsidiaries, Altitude Telecom and Altitude Infrastructure, the group provides services and support for business consumers and infrastructure projects run by regional government authorities.

For more information, visit their website at http://www.altitudetelecom.fr.


NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Thu 11-Sep-08 09:41:38
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
And of course Japan sees further progress:-

WiMax far ahead of LTE at Japan's NEC
NEC's WiMax equipment will be running in up to three networks and 20 trials by the end of this year, while its LTE equipment will be in just two

Dan Nystedt (IDG News Service) 09/09/2008 11:18:00

The future of broadband networking at Japan's NEC is clear.
The company's WiMax operations far outpace its work in the telecommunications industry's mobile broadband standard, LTE (long term evolution).
WiMax is the wireless broadband successor to Wi-Fi and is being promoted mainly by the computer industry, which also championed Wi-Fi.
NEC is providing equipment for as many as three WiMax networks that will be up and running by the end of this year, said Toshiyuki Kambe, manager of mobile network solutions division at NEC.

The company's equipment is already in testing at 20 additional test sites, including projects in Thailand and Taiwan, he said.
NEC was selected by Thailand's Crown Prince Hospital Foundation to provide WiMax equipment to medical facilities in the country's northern Chiang Khong region.
The foundation's decision to try out WiMax gear for medical services is partly due to the success of similar trials running in the city of Hualien, Taiwan, NEC said.
NEC started working with Taiwanese WiMax license winner Tatung Infocomm using NEC equipment in its Remote Care medical project last year.

Taiwan and Thailand are ahead of many countries in Asia in WiMax development, having already issued licenses to operators.
Taiwanese authorities auctioned off six licenses last year, while the Thai government issued 12 WiMax licenses in January of this year.

NEC faces the toughest competition for WiMax equipment contracts from Motorola of the U.S., Kambe said.

The LTE business is far different for NEC.

By the end of this year, NEC will only have a few projects on the go, including one with NTT DoCoMo in Japan and another with Verizon Wireless in the U.S., an NEC representative said. Commercial trials in both projects will start around the end of next year or later depending on the operator, he said.
He said NEC hopes to finalize talks for a few more deals to provide LTE equipment by the end of this year.

NEC faces far more competition in LTE than in WiMax. The company competes against several companies to provide LTE equipment, including Ericsson, Nokia Siemens Networks and Huawei Technologies.

http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;950301293

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 15-Sep-08 10:31:28
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Beyond WiMAX
From Cellular-News.
New World Record for Wireless Optical Transmission

Italian and Japanese scientists have demonstrated a laser based wireless communications system which has achieved a record transmission of 1.28 Terabit/s (or 1280 Gigabit/s) in a free air link between two transceivers installed on the roof of the CEIIC building and on the roof of the Building A at the Italian National Research Council around 210 meters away.

The experiment was carried out by a team from the Centre of Excellence for Information Engineering and Communication (CEIIC) of the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in Pisa in collaboration with their Japanese partners from the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Waseda University.

The optical communication system was set up with two transparent Free Space Optics antennas between an ultra-wide band fiber link and optical transmission in the air. The two antennas, placed high up, were not subject to interruptions due to people or cars passing.

"The 1.28 Terabit/s optical data traffic was generated in the CEIIC laboratory on the first floor then transmitted to the terrace of the same building through a fiber optic link and transparently connected to one of the antennas that sent the signals into the air (wireless - free space optics). In the second building this signal is collected from the second antenna directly to another fiber and then looped back through the same apparatus to the first one and then returned back in fiber to the CEIIC laboratory, where it is finally tested. "The result was a broadcast of 1.2 Terabit/s (32 channels at 40 Gbit/s), which is well above the maximum value so far known (16 channels at 10 Gbit / s) which was achieved in Korea" says Ernesto Ciaramella, Professor of Telecommunications at CEIIC of Sant'Anna School, a member of team that has followed the experiment step by step.

The communication systems that operate on fiber help to achieve transmissions at high capacity (several hundred Gigabit/s, on just one fiber). Such systems are currently in use worldwide and are the backbone of the global network of medium to long distance communication, and the basic infrastructure for the telephony network and the Internet. The use of such types of communication is not strictly limited to optical fibers. In some instances, it may be more convenient to make connections in free air (wireless) over limited distances.

Up to now the main drawbacks of this technology are linked to the air turbulences, weather conditions and to the difficulties to have a stable alignment of the terminals (automatically compensating for any effects of vibration). Generally, transmissions of this type are unstable over time and are limited to transmission capacity values that are far below systems of optical fibers.

The team say that this experiment demonstrates, for the first time, that is possible to establish a transparent and stable free space connection between two fiber trunks carrying ultra-wideband data traffic.

Posted to the site http://www.cellular-news.com/ on 15th September 2008

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 15-Sep-08 10:43:59
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Why Mobile WiMAX?

NextPhase Wireless,Inc.
Anaheim, Ca. Sept. 11 2008

Today's world is a 24x7, on-the-go world driven by a global economy fed by information on demand. The past few decades have seen user demand drive technological growth from the horse and buggy days to being able to talk on a wireless analog device to an information era in which talking on a cell phone is frequently a secondary benefit to an aging digital cellular technology that allows us to exchange data, access the Internet and view video on pocket-sized devices. Personal computing hardware with processing capabilities greater than equipment that only a few decades ago required more space than a single family home was the norm. Do you remember when cellular telephones needed their own briefcase, or how about the transition from analog to digital when phones became a commodity?

The cellular companies took what some say were baby steps in delivering broadband with their CDMA and EV-DO technologies, but with today's bigger, better, faster mindset, these thirty year old technologies which were recently considered emerging technologies, are not meeting consumer demand and are quickly becoming the dial up equivalent of wireless communications.

Today, cellular communications has become a necessity not an option. Leaders like AT&T, Verizon Wireless and Sprint Nextel are gobbling up licensed spectrum to support emerging WiMAX technologies as they look to grow with the times and demand. But it's not only the cellular providers spending billions of dollars on radio spectrum to support WiMAX efforts. Cable TV players are also in the mix. And interestingly enough, Frontier Communications, an EchoStar company that owns Dish Network, spent more than $700 Million on 700 MHz licenses. This spring there were over 19 billion dollars in FCC auctions for acquisition of the 700 MHZ spectrum. Of the aforementioned, only Sprint Nextel made no play at 700 MHz spectrum and went after 2.5GHz licenses including those previously owned by schools, universities and churches.

"Realizing where demand is heading with YouTube, MySpace and other video and bandwidth intensive applications for the younger generation of users, and recognizing the impact WiMAX will have on wireless technologies over the next couple of decades, NextPhase Wireless, a nationwide developer of WiMAX networks obtained its nationwide 3.65 GHz license in January to support its 802.16e Mobile WiMAX plan. In addition the 29 and 31 GHz spectrum purchased from NextLink, the 3.65 GHz license will allow the company to provide a stable broadband link to our mobile and businesscustomers."

Tom Hemingway, CEO.
http://tinyurl.com/3em3rs

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Thu 18-Sep-08 10:26:24
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
I find this article from Electronics Weekly to be quite informative and worth perusal:-

What's needed to make 4G wireless a reality
by Tony Lefebvre
Wednesday 17 September 2008

The industry is buzzing about next-generation wireless services such as Wimax and LTE, but these services will require significant changes to the underlying wireless infrastructure, and carriers face several issues in choosing the right migration path.

What is a 4G service?
The term “4G wireless” generally describes the next evolution of wireless communications. While 3G systems such as EVDO, HSPA and UMTS are delivering enough data bandwidth for some applications, the goal of 4G systems is to support voice, data and streamed multimedia for all users in all locations. This means that 4G systems must be capable of delivering from 100Mbit/s to 1Gbit/s of bandwidth to each subscriber, both indoors and out. The main technologies being developed for 4G services are WiMAX and 3GPP long-term evolution (LTE) with some interest in WiBro, iBurst, and 3GPP2 ultra-mobile broadband (UMB).

Naturally, carriers want to offer 4G services without disrupting service to their existing subscribers. In order to provide backward compatibility for users of legacy services, the various groups developing 4G standards are aiming to support most of the standards used by 2G, 2.5G, and 3G services today. However, 4G infrastructure will be completely based on IP technology, so new infrastructure must be integrated carefully. This has several implications for carriers planning to upgrade their networks to support 4G services.

Coverage
4G services will require higher-quality coverage in more places. Earlier wireless networks were based on the idea of blanketing an outdoor area with frequency from cell towers and rooftops, but 4G services will often use frequencies of 2GHz and higher, and these will attenuate more quickly. This means more antennas will be required, and that wireless signals will have to be boosted inside buildings, in urban canyons, in underground facilities, and other locations where traditional macro coverage will not reach.

At the same time, interference will be an even greater issue than it is today. Even in areas with an abundant supply of rooftop cell towers, users today often find that signal strength tails off towards the lower floors of tall buildings, while on the upper floors of buildings, subscribers can experience poor service because signals from multiple towers may be visible and the phone constantly hunts from one signal to another.

Because 4G services will require more antennas in more locations, carriers will have to engineer systems more carefully to minimise interference from the multiple antennas that any given device may be able to “see” at a time.

Capacity
Macro networks that were designed to support an average user base five or ten years ago cannot support current call volumes or the need for higher-speed data support. Many users have experienced an inability to make or sustain a call in stadiums, on bridges, or even on crowded highways or urban sidewalks simply because the nearest macro towers are overloaded. 4G wireless cells will be much smaller than today’s cell areas not only because of the need for better coverage (due to signal attenuation) but also the need for higher per-user capacity.

4G networks delivering from 100 to 1,000 times as much bandwidth per user will require much larger and more cost-effective backhaul networks. Most of today’s macro cellular networks still rely on 1.5Mbit/s E1 lines, and these will rapidly be swamped by users exchanging photos, videos and data files. 3G data services are further straining existing backhaul networks. Carriers implementing new 4G architectures will need even larger backhaul pipes, and they should try to reduce costs at the same time.

Maintaining existing revenues
While the goal of 4G services is to increase average revenue per user (ARPU) with new services, carriers must first ensure that existing subscriber services are not disrupted. Early adopters will be willing to pay for new advanced services, but carriers must continue to provide service to the majority of subscribers who are not willing to pay and require only basic services. As a result, new 4G equipment must integrate with the network separately, or it must offer backward support for previous services.

Timing the changes
The first challenge is coverage. There are few subscribers for a new service at the outset, but these subscribers will still demand ubiquitous coverage. Carriers must find ways to deploy coverage in the most cost-effective manner while allowing easy scaling to support additional coverage as the user base grows. In the old macro network model, extending coverage required installation of new base stations, but newer solutions allow carriers to expand coverage via remote radios so that coverage can be expanded independently of more expensive base station gear.

As the subscriber count ramps, the capacity issue rears its head, and more base station and switching capacity is required. But even though more base stations are required, it is more cost-effective to use distributed radios to deliver the signal while maintaining base stations in a central location. With base stations consolidated in one location, they are easier to maintain. Moreover, the facilities costs of distributing radios are far lower, as these can be mounted on utility poles or overhead lines.

As network capacity grows along with subscriber counts and service demands, carriers will next have to address the backhaul problem. Here again, the base station consolidation idea makes sense, since it allows carriers to aggregate backhaul capacity in a single location rather than paying for individual connections throughout a geographically dispersed network of base stations. IP technologies such as Ethernet will give carriers maximum transport efficiency at the lowest cost, with easy scaling to support bandwidth growth. In addition, fibre or microwave backhaul technologies can offer the ability to transport multiple bands of traffic, thereby increasing flexibility as well as capacity.

Improving efficiency
Operating efficiency is always an important goal. By centralising basestations and distributing signals with Distributed Antennae Systems (DAS) solutions, carriers can make more efficient use of scarce wireless spectrum. Distributing coverage over a larger number of smaller cells enables carriers to maximise frequency reuse, thereby making the most of the limited spectrum. Carriers can maximise capacity within the cell for 4G services while reusing this limited commodity over multiple non-adjacent cells. And as we have seen, centralising base stations also enables better use of backhaul resources.

Throughout their networks, carriers will leverage IP-based technology, either via metro Ethernet or customer-owned DSL connections. IP transport allows carriers to precisely match the bandwidth being used with the service level desired, it eliminates the need to lease backhaul circuits from potential competitors, and it offers easier maintenance with lower costs.

Tony Lefebvre is director of product management for outdoor wireless at ADC.com

http://tinyurl.com/3ztbg4



NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 26-Sep-08 12:36:34
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Home:-

NOTTINGHAM TO PLANT WiMAX FOREST

Cutting Students' Wires
By Tim Ferguson

Nottingham Trent University is leading a rollout of WiMax in the city to allow businesses and community organisations to road test the technology.
The "WiMax Forest" network is due to be switched on towards the end of October and equipment to receive the signal will be installed over the following 12 months.
Nottingham Trent students will be able to access the long-range wireless broadband network along with local businesses, community groups and selected families.
Various organisations, including Intel, are investing around £250,000 in the Nottingham pilot after it was proposed by the university's Strategic Partnership group. Other organisations involved in the rollout include East Midlands New Technology Initiative Network and Accelerate Nottingham, part of the Greater Nottingham Partnership.
Speaking to silicon.com, member of Nottingham Trent University's public spaces research group, Frank Abbott, said: "WiMax in a way is a technology which is additional to what's already there and can fill in certain gaps and do certain things which the normal - either fibre or wireless - provision can't do and [Intel] wanted to see how people could exploit those opportunities."
There will be two WiMax broadcasting stations sited at Djanogly Technology College and Haddon Park School.
Among other things, the pilot will examine the impact buildings and landscape have on WiMax signal distribution.
In addition, local businesses and community organisations will have the opportunity to experiment with different applications of the technology.
Abbott said: "The long term plan is that it becomes a network which is owned in some way by the community."

Published by silicon.com: 24 September 2008

http://tinyurl.com/3gpu8n

and Away:

Alcatel-Lucent Wins Spanish WiMAX Contract

Alcatel-Lucent says that it is one of the companies selected by Spain's Neo-Sky to deploy a turnkey WiMAX 802.16e-2005 (Rev-e) network in Madrid, enabling the Spanish broadband operator to test and accelerate the deployment of WiMAX services in Spain.

In the framework of this field trial, Alcatel-Lucent will provide Neo-Sky with a complete WiMAX Rev-e solution, including base stations and WiMAX access controllers, and IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) core networking equipment, software and application platforms and end-user terminals. Alcatel-Lucent also will provide design and planning for end-to-end integration of Neo-Sky’s network along with maintenance and provisioning services.

“With this WiMAX field trial we are laying the foundations to know the performances that the future commercial networks will be able to support to meet our corporate customer’s requirements for easy-to-use wireless broadband services offering nomadic capabilities, including voice, data, and multimedia, and best-in-class quality of service.” said César Arranz, Executive President of Neo-Sky.

Posted 25th September 2008 to:

http://www.cellular-news.com/story/33804.php




NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Wed 01-Oct-08 18:46:43
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
I wonder which horse the Forum would back - of course it does depend on your course.

No Contest Between WiMAX and LTE
By Brad Smith
WirelessWeek - October 01, 2008

CHICAGO—You might think a WiMAX conference wouldn’t be a place to find companies offering competing technologies, but that wasn’t the case Tuesday during the 4G Executive Summit.

The summit, a prelude to Wednesday’s start of the WiMAX World show at McCormick Place, drew a number of participants who only see WiMAX as competition. Among them were Hank Kafka, vice president of architecture for AT&T, and Chris Pearson, president of 3G Americas. You might also include Dr. Peter Meissner, operating officer of the NGMN Alliance, whose carrier members all come from the current crop of 3G operators although he said the alliance is technology-neutral.

The potential for conflict might have existed but the speeches and panels were mostly open-hearted, except for some commercial interludes pitching the benefits of WiMAX or the GSM world’s evolution to Long Term Evolution (LTE). WiMAX advocates said they have the lead over LTE, which some said will launch as early as 2010. The LTE side maintained a lead because its evolutionary path includes the already-launched HSPA and will soon offer HSPA+.

Kafka, questioned about AT&T Mobility’s deployment plans, said the carrier would launch HSPA+ within 2 years and that there “is a really good chance” that LTE would be launched within 5 years.

There really isn’t any debate among operators over which technology is best, according to Charlie Martin, the wireless chief technology officer for Huawei Technologies in the United States. Martin said the operators are picking technologies based on their business models.

Existing cellular operators mostly see LTE as their migration path, Martin said, while WiMAX is being chosen by greenfield operators.

“We see a clear dividing line,” he said. “It’s generally very clear for us which technology to recommend.”

Martin and several other speakers said it’s more important for operators to think about the technologies they can enable with either option. Martin said the next generation of mobile technologies would include social netowrking, peer-to-peer networking, VoIP, gaming, personal navigation and video telephony.

“What carriers need to do is turn the pipe into a value channel,” he said.

Berge Ayvazian, chief strategy officer for the Yankee Group, said one of the things he advises any 4G operator is to have a “clear business model.” He said carriers don’t appear to be driven by demand but by competition.

“We need to create a mobile Internet business model that will bring profitability,” Ayvazian said. He said Korea Telecom has started to build a business model with 300,000 customers for its WiBro network, which uses a technology similar to WiMAX.

Mo Shakouri, vice president of marketing for the WiMAX Forum, said he preferred not to think of WiMAX in terms of a 4G technology. That’s because WiMAX offers a new technology and a new business model, not an evolution from a previous technology, he said.

Sprint’s launch of its Xohm network in Baltimore earlier this week is important to the WiMAX industry as a whole, but there also are more than 100 other operators who plan to use the technology, Shakouri said. The most important thing for Sprint is that WiMAX and its data capabilities are a complement for its cellular network.

Shakouri also said he preferred focusing on the commercial deployment of WiMAX globally now instead of paying too much attention to the evolution of the technology through the next standard, 802.16m.

“The challenge is to get the business model to work now,” he said. “In the future, we’ll do 802.16m. But let’s crawl and walk before we dream of the future.”

http://www.wirelessweek.com/article.aspx?id=163208

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sat 04-Oct-08 12:18:53
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Speculative dialogue about the future use of Femtocells from BroadbandReports.com at:

http://preview.tinyurl.com/3pevrl

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sat 04-Oct-08 13:05:13
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Hold the Front Page News from UK (a rare event) - F4 hedging its bets:

October 02, 2008

Freedom4 Launches Integrated 3G and WiFi Mobile Broadband Service

By Rajani Baburajan TMCnet Contributing Editor

Freedom4, which has a national license to deploy Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access services in the 3.6 GHz band, has launched what it claims is the U.K.’s first integrated third generation (3G) and WiF) mobile broadband service.]

With the addition of the 3G data service into its offerings, Freedom4, which is working with businesses and local authorities to build the infrastructure to offer broadband wireless Internet access across the U.K., has the potential to provide wireless broadband to 99 percent of the population.
 
The new service, Mobile Broadband 1000, offers value-added services including WiFi hotspot locator from satellite navigation systems and text service to find the nearest wireless access point to subscriber’s current position.
 
Freedom4 has also expanded its WiFi network in the UK with the addition of roaming partnerships with Spectrum Interactive and Briteyellow. With this, the total number of WiFi hotspots in the UK will be over 4,000 and 50,000 globally.
 
The new services will be a boon to the UK population. The recent Freedom4 tests include download speeds peaking at 17 Mbps, with average speeds reaching 2.8 Mbps. Over 600 connections were tested across the UK.
 
“Our customers want the fastest possible download speeds available in the UK whilst on the move,” said Richard Cunliffe, chief operating officer, Freedom4 WiFi, in a statement.
 
Pricing for the new Mobile Broadband 1000 service starts from £25 per month, which includes dongle and any combination of either 1 Gb of 3G, or 1,000 WiFi minutes.
 
“We are committed to providing a high quality service and our research has shown that the new combined package can provide speeds significantly faster than other mobile broadband products in the marketplace. Designed with the user in mind, this service will provide greater speeds, availability and functionality,” Cunliffe added.
 
Freedom4 wants to ensure high quality services to its customers. For this, it has forged partnerships with wireless technologies companies including Airspan Networks, Nokia Siemens Networks, Ericsson and National Grid Wireless to provide WiMAX services to nomadic workers, businesses.
 
Freedom4 through its WiFi and 3G service can provide data access to businesses and consumers in the UK and in 178 countries worldwide. Users can roam to WiFi hotspots through one click client software.

Edited by Mae Kowalke

http://tinyurl.com/49gpt6




NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sun 05-Oct-08 17:54:32
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Here is the official confimation of what PCCW are planning to do:

Grant to vary UK Broadband’s 3.5GHz Spectrum Licence
London – January 23, 2008.

Following Ofcom’s decision on the 22nd Nov 2007 to vary UK Broadband’s 3.5GHz spectrum licence to allow mobile services, the company can today confirm that a new licence has been formally granted. UK Broadband has been evaluating new technologies, in particular mobile WiMAX (802.16e), and with this licence variation is now positioned to deliver mobile broadband to UK consumers.

This variation positions the company as the only mobile WiMAX 3.5GHz spectrum holder in the UK.
A number of industry and market developments during the last 12 months have indicated that WiMAX is a key technology to deliver wireless broadband in the future, and that 3.5 GHz will be an important band of standardised spectrum for WiMAX..

UK broadband continues to operate its successful pilot service branded NOW, in the Thames valley and areas of London. The NOW service is based on TD-CDMA technology and the company is reviewing options to migrate the service to mobile WiMAX in the coming months
http://www.ukbroadband.co.uk/news.html#february2008

And also this associated news item:

UK Broadband awarded 4 Licences in OFCOM Microwave Auction
London – February 22nd 2008

Ofcom today announced the results of the 10 to 40GHz microwave auction. Having participated in this auction, UK Broadband are pleased to have won 4 of the 40GHz licences that were offered. This totals a contiguous spectrum block of 2x1GHz for £120,000 and represents a very large amount of spectrum in this important microwave backhaul frequency band. The new microwave frequency licences will allow UK Broadband to reduce costs dramatically and give more control over the quality of the current network and any future mobile WiMAX deployments. The licences won are technology and application neutral and last for a minimum 15 year term.
Full details of the auction results can be found on the Ofcom website:
http://tinyurl.co.uk/9dju

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Fri 10-Oct-08 22:29:58
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Sudden spate of WiMAX enabled devices announced this week. Following is a report of field testing in the US:

USING WIMAX ON NOKIA N810 IN BALTIMORE

It's an early example of using the faster wireless service on a personal mobile device
By Matt Hamblen
October 10, 2008 (Computerworld)

The Nokia N810, one of the first in a new category of mobile Internet sevices, will be able to play video and music and browse the Internet at mobile WiMax speeds, based on live demonstrations over the faster wireless service in Baltimore recently.

The video shows the device, to be sold by the end of the month for $499. In one test, it operated over a WiMax downlink at 3.9 Mbit/sec. from inside a townhouse in Baltimore's Inner Harbour. The nearest WiMax antenna, part of the network being built in Baltimore, was located three blocks away. The N810 will function in both WiMax and Wi-Fi modes.

Other demonstrations of WiMax, being provided by the Sprint Nextel Corp. Xohm unit, included bus tours through mid-rise buildings along the harbour front as well as taxi boat tours over the Inner Harbour. Most of the demonstrations included speed tests of WiMax with air cards or embedded WiMax chipsets from Intel Corp. inside various laptops, with downlink speeds of more than 3 Mbit/sec.

Sprint has been advertising the average downlink speeds of the Xohm network at 2Mbit/sec. to 4 Mbit/sec. The company won't disclose how many users have signed up for the service, which has been operating in Baltimore for nearly two weeks.

During the harbour water taxi demonstration, the downlink speeds sometimes fell below 2 Mbit/sec. Sprint and Intel engineers said the lower throughput was due to the propagation characteristics of wireless signals over water. Water conducts the signals well, meaning the signal can travel farther than intended. However, all types of radio signals can interfere with one another over water, a common problem for radio engineers.

Based on several interviews with Sprint officials including President Barry West, the biggest concern for initial users on the Baltimore Xohm network, appears to be with gaps in service on land where the network is not completely built out. West said that the network is about 70% finished, gaps are being addressed and Baltimore was chosen partly because it is on the water, in order to give engineers a challenge.

http://tinyurl.com/4olmuw

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Mon 13-Oct-08 12:12:40
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Balti & chips. Bring it on!

Beyond mobile broadband, WiMAX is about blowing up the wireless business model
Posted by Jason Hiner October 13th, 2008

On Wednesday in Baltimore at the official launch of America’s first mobile WiMAX network, Sprint CTO Barry West said that if this was only about launching a new type of network with faster performance then it would be significant. However, it is abundantly clear that for West, Sprint, and their band of high-profile WiMAX partners, this is about a lot more than just a faster mobile network.

What is it about? What’s the subtext? Here’s my interpretation:
It is about unleashing a new generation of applications and devices with broadband connectivity.
It is about changing the balance of power in the cellular industry.
It is about bringing wireless broadband to the masses by making it less expensive and more open.
It is about turning the U.S. from a laggard into a leader in the mobile world.
It is about a bunch of underdogs who are trying to leapfrog a set of powerful, entrenched leaders.

Is this really the beginning of WiMAX?

I’ve seen a number of consumers in the U.S. respond to news of the official U.S WiMAX launch in Baltimore by saying. “This isn’t new. My town has had WiMAX for a couple years.” What’s going on here is that several smaller cities in the U.S. already have a version of WiMAX called “Fixed WiMAX” based on the 802.16d protocol.

This is essentially the same as Cable or DSL where a consumer has an Internet modem in their home, only instead of a phone line or a coaxial cable running into that modem, the Fixed WiMAX customer has a modem with a long-distance radio antenna in it. This is the equivalent of an early beta version of WiMAX.

What Sprint has launched in Baltimore is the first U.S. deployment of Mobile WiMAX, based on the 802.16e protocol. This version of WiMAX can be used for stationary modems, but it can also provide roaming Internet access across large areas and at highway driving speeds. So if you have Xohm WiMAX as your Internet service in Baltimore, your connection is good not only in your office or your house but anywhere you go in the city and throughout most of the metro area. It’s like combining your Cable Internet account with a 3G broadband account.

The limitation, of course, is that it is only in Baltimore for now. However, Sprint is preparing to launch its next two Xohm networks in Washington, D.C. and Chicago before the end of the year. Then it plans to light up Philadelphia, Dallas/Fort Worth, Boston, and Providence, Rhode Island. Meanwhile, Clearwire is prepping Mobile WiMAX networks in Portland, Atlanta, Las Vegas, and Grand Rapids, Michigan. The Sprint and Clearwire networks will interoperate.

In fact, Sprint is in the process of spinning off its Xohm business unit and merging it with Clearwire to create a new WiMAX company, with backing from Intel, Google, Comcast, and others. The new company will still need to raise about $3 billion of the $5 billion needed in order to compete a nationwide WiMAX network.

What does WiMAX really change?

Besides the obvious benefits of mobilizing high speed broadband, there are three significant developments that are part of WiMAX that could be game-changers in the technology industry.

1. Embeddable broadband

The cellular network was built to handle voice calls. It has been upgraded and re-engineered to handle data, but there are limitations to how much data it can handle and how much it can scale. The cellular network also has a business and usage model that strictly regulates end-point devices. That limits innovation from third-party developers on the network.

While the WiMAX network is very similar to the cellular network in its physical infrastructure, it was conceived from the ground up to be a pure IP network, built on open standards, and designed to be as open as the Internet itself. In that sense, WiMAX is simply a wireless on-ramp to the Internet.

With that in mind, Intel and several of the other founding  members of the WiMAX Forum set out to make WiMAX chips that would be mass-produced, inexpensive, and royalty-free. It has worked. Embedded WiMAX chips for laptops, for example, are already cheaper than their embedded 3G counterparts. For example, a WiMAX module will typically add about $60-$80 to the price of a laptop, while embedded 3G will add $150-$200.

But beyond that, these cheap WiMAX chips are poised to be embedded in all kinds of devices, including
Parking meters
Home energy meters
Vending machines
Toys
Traffic lights
Cars and other motor vehicles

“The defining difference between WiMax and any other technologies is in the embedded devices,” said West. “There are more than 20 WiMAX chipset manufacturers… In CDMA, there’s one and a half.” West was referring to Qualcomm, which dominates the CDMA market and charges royalties on its chips.

2. Wireless Applications 

With broadband being embedded in so many more devices, that also opens the door for new applications for both businesses and consumers. Since virtually anything will be able to connect to the Internet, that will offer new opportunities for connectivity apps that can streamline business processes, provide new communications opportunities, and do greater levels of data collection, for example.

West said, “WiMax really is a platform for innovation… We are inundated with people that want to work with us to build new applications.”

Sprint CEO Dan Hesse added, “There will be so many applications we haven’t even thought of.”

3. Replacing the cellular business model

Make no mistake, Sprint and Intel are not just in the mobile broadband business as an altruistic attempt to bring fast wireless Internet access to the masses. Sprint is a distant third behind AT&T and Verizon Wireless in the U.S. cellular business and needs a better way to compete. All of the carriers know that the future lies in their data networks — even voice traffic will eventually run over the data network.

That’s why Sprint took the gamble of investing heavily in WiMAX and is doing everything it can to bring it to market as a open standard that will foster great innovation from third party hardware and software vendors.

Intel sees the writing on the wall that a lot of the computing world is migrating beyond PCs to include wireless  and mobile devices, where Intel hasn’t traditionally been one of the primary chipmakers. That’s Qualcomm’s territory. Intel wants a piece of the action, but instead of trying to compete in the current market, Intel is investing in the next generation with WiMAX. It’s also a technology that helps Intel in its core PC business because more and better connectivity usually translates into more people buying computers.

Ultimately, both Sprint and Intel want to replace the current cellular model with a platform that is open to devices and applications and ties into all of the development that is already happening on the Internet.

Now, to start, Sprint’s first Xohm network in Baltimore does not expressly try go after telephony.  That would be silly to do since the coverage is so limited at this point. However, I have seen prototype WiMAX phones from Motorola and others, and there are even reports that the Google G1 will eventually include a WiMAX chip or be released in a WiMAX version.

In a surprisingly frank admission at the Baltimore launch, West said, “We’re not trying to go head-to-head with cellular services today. We will in the future.”

Bottom line

WiMAX could be the beginning of the convergence between traditional ISPs and cellular carriers. Or WiMAX could fail to get the funding it needs and fail to win over enough users to reach critical mass before other cellular carriers come to market with their next generation cellular data technologies, such as LTE.

Which ever way it goes, it’s very likely that WiMAX will drive down the cost of mobile broadband and force the other cellular carriers to become more open in their policies toward third-party devices and applications. We’re already seeing Verizon Wireless take steps in this direction. This should eventually fuel a new wave of hardware and software innovation.

http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=10401

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Sat 18-Oct-08 12:58:58
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Another positive report from Baltimore at:-

http://tinyurl.com/58hmv2

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User kijoma
(learned) Sat 18-Oct-08 22:48:19
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
hmm

Wimax has a lot of hype, i remember when bluetooth was to revolutionise everything back in the first half of this century, they spoke of having it in everything etc..

i kinda like this line :-

This is essentially the same as Cable or DSL where a consumer has an Internet modem in their home, only instead of a phone line or a coaxial cable running into that modem, the Fixed WiMAX customer has a modem with a long-distance radio antenna in it. This is the equivalent of an early beta version of WiMAX.


they are of course describing a fixed wireless system, doubtfully anything to do with WIMAX, America has a lot of fixed wireless ISP's, i doubt more than a few use WIMAX.

We of course use the same here, piping over 13 Mbps real rates to each client over distances of typically 30 km or less. This isn't WIMAX as it cannot do that speed/distance at anywhere near the same cost to us or the end customer..

Its good to hear a lot of money is being thrown at WIMAX in other countries as no doubt it will here too eventually. Shame it detracts from throwing money more wisely at existing mature proven methods though





Bill Lewis - MD
Kijoma Broadband - (Division of Kijoma Solutions Ltd)
High Speed Wireless broadband ISP
The UK's top rated Wireless ISP 2005 - 2008 - ISP Review
Top 5 finalist in best UK wireless ISP - ISPA's 2008
Members of the Internet Service Providers association (www.ISPA.org.uk)
http://www.kijoma.net
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Tue 21-Oct-08 11:55:39
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: kijoma] [link to this post]
 
Imagine if Sprint/Clearwire becomes a success - which UK outfit could afford to rollout such an alternative to the mobile incumbents?
I guess its unlikely that Richard Li will have any funds available for further ventures in the west, NOW that sell off of part of PCCW in Hong Kong, has been shelved.
Two more Baltimore testimonials:-

http://tinyurl.com/5lu5cc

and another from WiMax.com

Techno Geeks gush over Sprint's WiMax

Congratulations, Mr. Hesse and Mr. West. Baltimore has WiMax. But will it work nationally? And can you pay for a national rollout?
These were some of the questions that Dan Hesse, Sprint Nextel's CEO, and Barry West, chief of the company's WiMax unit, faced yesterday during the event they organized to proclaim the first commercial launch in a major city of their ultra-fast wireless service.

As eWeek noted, "West said if WiMax can make it in Baltimore, then it can make it anywhere, noting Baltimore's brick buildings and abundance of water made covering the city with a wireless Internet connection fast enough to run Web 2.0 applications a unique challenge."

Here are some other reviews from Sprint's big day with WiMax:

The Street.com:

"What we saw was very impressive -- we're talking downloads as fast as 5,557 kilobits per second and 1,702 kilobits kbps for uploads. It was even faster in the simulated home-use setup we were shown. Previous rumors had suggested there were indoor reception problems for WiMax. Overall, that's pretty amazing for a wireless network. I'm hoping that as more and more users come online, the speeds don't deteriorate too much."

Unstrung:

To start down that yellow chip road, Sprint has unveiled 10 laptops with embedded WiMax from Acer Inc., AsusTek Computer Inc., Lenovo Group Ltd., and Toshiba Corp., along with a ZyXEL Communications Corp. USB modem and some PC cards. West is promising "nearly a dozen devices" on the market by the end of December with "20 additional devices going through the certification process."
The concentration on laptops is perhaps apt, since Sprint really is focusing on selling the service as a citywide "best endeavour" hotspot . So it's not meant to be as dependable as, say, a lower-speed connection on an older cellular network. "We're about three quarters of the way through the build-out program here," said West. "We're not trying to compete with cellular for now; we will eventually."

Cnet:

Hesse said the new Clearwire will need a total of about $5 billion to complete its network. The company has initial funding of about $3.2 billion, which means it will need to raise another $2 billion to complete the network. He acknowledged that the current economic crisis could make accessing this capital difficult. But he said he is confident that if the company found itself unable to get the necessary funding that it could turn to its partners for the cash.

"Just look at the cash on our partners' balance sheets," he said "We've got Intel, Google, the cable companies, and even our own cash. That is the advantage of having six well-capitalized founders."

Ultimate consumer demand for WiMax service remains unproven. Here's a data point showing that before the new Baltimore service is even days old, at least officially, the techno elite community is giddy about the prospects of Xohm spreading throughout the land. Or at least to Boston, Chicago and Dallas.

Xconomy.com noted a report that a Xohm representative working at a festival in Baltimore spilled the beans about WiMax in Boston.

This is the scoop from mp3car.com: Here is the technical dirt from a guy called Mike who works at Xohm. Xohm networks are active in Chicago, Boston, Dallas, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Northern Virginia and of course Baltimore. Mike and his co-workers warned me that the networks will work but are “not supported” and are still being tested. They did say my Samsung Expresscard WiMax hardware (which I bought last week) will work even in Chicago, which is using Motorola tower equipment. To my knowledge, no coverage area has even been posted for these regions.

For those of you broadband geeks our there, it might be time to UPS air your Baltimore WiMax hardware in for your fix of WiMax geekery. I am flying to Boston on Wednesday with my Baltimore hardware. When we get there I will let you know how it works at the airport and surrounding suburbs.

Submitted by JASON GERTZEN on October 9, 2008 - 6:10am.




NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(regular) Thu 06-Nov-08 12:53:12
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
A snippet of home news, albeit not very encouraging:-

UK’s 2GHz auction to take place in March – Does Mobile WiMAX have a chance?

Juha Korhonen Cantab Wireless <Juha.Korhonen@cantabwireless.com
Cambridge, 31.10.08

UK telecom regulator Ofcom and the existing UK mobile operators have been at loggerheads for some time now regarding the auction of 2 GHz spectrum. The new spectrum comes in three bands: 2010-2025 MHz, 2290-2302 MHz, and 2500-2690 MHz, and it will be technology-neutral.

The main difference of opinion is that Ofcom would like to proceed with the auction as soon as possible, whereas mobile operators argue that that they cannot know whether or not they will need this spectrum until they know what is going to happen with the 900 MHz GSM spectrum band. The 900 MHz band is currently limited to GSM technology only, but mobile operators would like to use it for LTE in the future. Ofcom is probably happy to upgrade their licences. Yet the issue is not straightforward: the upgrade will considerably increase the value of those licences and mobile operators who only possess 1.8 GHz spectrum at the moment may cry foul. Ofcom must find a formula which is satisfactory for both 900 MHz and 1800 MHz operators.

In the meantime, T-Mobile and O2 are running a delaying action campaign. They argue that the new auction should not take place before the problem vis-à-vis 900 MHz licences has been solved. They have launched legal challenges to prevent the auction from taking place. However, they may also have other motives since, by postponing the auction, they are preventing potential Mobile WiMAX operators from launching their networks on that spectrum.

Now Ofcom has stated that it expects all legal action to be resolved by February 2009, and the auction should then go ahead in March. Spectrum auctions tend to be prone to delays, so this date may still change, but at least there is some light in the end of the tunnel.

Currently, there are only a few WiMAX operators in the UK. Of these, only UK Broadband has a licence which allows it to provide mobile services. Freedom4 has also applied to Ofcom to amend its licence to allow mobility. However, it is worth noting that the existing UK WiMAX operators use higher frequency bands, such as 3.4 GHz, 3.6 GHz, 3.8 GHz and 5.4 GHz. Building a large coverage network using these bands is very difficult. The new bands between 2.0 GHz and 2.7 GHz are more suitable for mobile services and thus their auction is eagerly awaited.

Yet, it is probable that even if WiMAX operators were successful in acquiring new 2 GHz spectrum, they may find it too hard to compete against incumbent mobile phone operators. Mobile phone operators already have wide coverage networks that can offer high-speed data services using HSDPA technology and they will also deploy LTE soon after 2010. Mobile operators do not actually need the new spectrum urgently. However, this will change when LTE arrives. LTE employs wider spectrum bands (20 MHz) than 2G or 3G technologies, and it cannot coexist on same spectrum bands with these older technologies. Therefore, mobile operators can afford to delay the auction and try to settle the 900 MHz licence issue first. The bonus for them is that at the same time they will make sure that Mobile WiMAX does not get a foothold in the UK.

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 11-Nov-08 15:08:44
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
As of yesterday, NOW is still evaluating, how long do they need before reaching a decision?

Meanwhile, here's a superb article from Guy Kewney that I overlooked earlier this year, not so much about WiMAX as about the opposition.

MOBILE BROADBAND: WHAT'S IT FOR?

Don't ask the operators


By Guy Kewney, NewsWireless.Net
Posted in The Register Telecoms, 26th August 2008

In the next few weeks (hint: CTIA is in three weeks) I'm expecting mobile operators to be offered a new tool, which will allow them to work out what on earth their mobile broadband customers are doing.

The mystery, however, is not "what is this tool, Guy?" - all will become clear quite quickly. What is mysterious is the answer to this question: "If mobile operators don't know what their customers are doing, how on earth do they know what to charge for the broadband?"

I put this question to an acknowledged expert, Simon Bransfield-Garth of CarrierIQ, who was typically forthright. "Their pricing plans make no sense to me. I think the carriers have little, or no idea of what people do with mobile broadband."

The mobile broadband revolution, in short, could be a bubble. If the carriers could provide ADSL-standard broadband for half the price of ADSL indefinitely, then the market would simply grow and grow. But it can't, and nobody in their right mind imagines they can; at some point, the bandwidth they offer will be swallowed up and they'll have to find more from somewhere. And that will cost real money.

Analysys Mason this week offered the opinion that the last six months have seen an "explosion" of mobile broadband, and quoted quite a lot more figures than we normally get to see.

The trouble is, there's no bottom line.

Take this cheerful-sounding statement from Matt Hatton's analysis of the mobile network operator's (MNO's) future:

"The rapid growth in mobile broadband and 3G data service adoption has far-reaching implications for MNOs' business models. Operators have tended to focus almost solely on providing narrowband voice and SMS, but the composition of their network traffic is changing."

Specifically, Hatton says, the volume of data is now exceeding the volume of voice. "T-Mobile reported in April 2008 that the volume of data traffic on its network in the UK had exceeded that of voice traffic for the first time in the first quarter of 2008.

"Mobile broadband pioneers, 3 UK and Vodafone, are likely to announce a similar trend this year. 3 UK reported a seven fold increase in the volume of data traffic on its network in the six months to March 2008."

What this tells us is that they had more 3G capacity than phone customers could use, and are now soaking up spare 3G capacity by selling bits to laptop users. What it doesn't tell us, however, is whether these are profitable bits. In other words, when will the current growth rate reach the point where they have to start investing in new network capacity? And what will that cost? And will the broadband payments cover that?

"Contention will definitely become an issue," said Bransfield-Garth. "Already, phone users will be familiar with the 'network busy' sign when they try to place a call at rush hour. What we need to know is whether it really is better for the MNOs to keep one BBC iPlayer viewer going, and to prevent 40 phone calls going through."

Behind the scenes, some operators still seem to have their heads screwed on. Vodafone, for example, is a major player in the wireless broadband business in the UK, and I've had one of their dongles for almost a year. I had an unofficial chat with a senior engineer, and asked, straight out: "How long can you survive in this market, competing with the wired suppliers, if your users really grow at current rates?"

"Oh, I'm all right, Jack," was his reply.

Actually, the answer was phrased in gobbledegook, and I had to ask another consultant (he won't let me say who) for a translation. His summary: "They have just done a deal with BT on the 21CN rollout, whereby they sign up early, and get a good deal for at least three years, and will be able to keep up with whatever users do."

Put another way, the Vodafone position is that everybody may sink into a bog of broadband contention, but where everybody else is on foot, Voda is on horseback. They'll be the last to drown. But, says Hatton, drown they jolly well will:

"MNOs need to review their requirements for network capacity immediately in response to this rapid change in traffic composition," he wrote. "They will need to invest further in their RANs as well as the ongoing upgrade to HSPA. The demand for additional network capacity – from reallocation of GSM spectrum, the 2.6GHz expansion band and the digital dividend spectrum – will be substantial."

Analysys Mason believes that the amount of additional spectrum made available will be sufficient to support the predicted demand during the next 3–5 years. But that's not all: "MNOs will also need to increase their backhaul capacity, which is currently the most significant limiting factor in terms of the amount of available bandwidth."

Surely, the mobile operators must know what they are doing, though? You wouldn't get into a market for broadband, competing with ADSL carriers, if you couldn't make money on this, right?

"To be honest, I doubt if any of them have been able to look that far ahead," said Bransfield-Garth.

The problem in September last year, when the market was blown open by Hutchison 3G and its flat rate broadband deal, was that they had masses of unused 3G capacity, and voice users weren't taking it up. BT's head of mobile broadband at the time told me that "as little as 3 per cent of the capacity for mobile data, is actually used; there's not the slightest chance we could over-sell it".

Well, was he right? Many observers think not. They say that the operators simply had to do something, anything, to increase data traffic; and any sales at any margin would do. "When they say 'we can't run out of capacity' what they really mean is: 'Over the next two years, if we grow at twice the rate we think we can, we'll still have spare capacity'. But they honestly haven't looked any further than the next six months," said my anonymous source.

The availability of a bit of network software to analyse what sort of data traffic they are generating will be really handy, of course. It would show whether this traffic is premium data, or throwaway traffic. If it's highly-critical business, time-premium based, then putting up prices will just increase margins. But if users are only using mobile because it's cheaper than their ISP can do it over BT ADSL, then putting up the price will kill the business stone dead.

The smart money says it's not mission-critical stuff. As Hatton says, "As well as increasing capacity, MNOs will need to keep a limit on costs because mobile broadband traffic will be less profitable than traditional voice and SMS traffic." And judging by the detail in his report, this isn't guesswork.

Another estimate suggests that current data rate charges work out at as little as one-twentieth the price per bit of voice traffic.

So, are current mobile broadband users watching re-runs of Doctor Who? Or is it sweaty-faced financial directors scanning the red ink on Bloomberg in real time, and logging onto Euronews streaming? If it's the latter, the future for mobile data looks hot. If it's Doctor Who and Deal Or No Deal, then people will switch to Sky and Slingboxen just as soon as the price rises above Sky subscription rates, or as soon as the data caps drop below three DVDs a month.

And if people genuinely want HD video, but only if they can get it at flat rate TalkTalk prices, then no amount of fudging and data rate capping can save the mobile broadband business.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/08/26/kewney_mobile_broadband



NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 14-Nov-08 22:36:54
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
NEWMARKET GETS WIMAXED UP

CI-Net's RedKite


By Emma Hughes: 05.11.08

NEWMARKET IN SUFFOLK is soon to receive a new service that beams high performance Internet connectivity to businesses in the area using WiMAX-ready fixed wireless radio signals from CI-Net.

CI-Net’s service, known as, RedKite ‘leased line in the sky’ will offer businesses 2-100 MB/per second symmetric Internet connections which will be delivered by a wireless base station providing wireless signals in a radius of up to 10 km.

Outdoor RedKite antennas will pick up the signals allowing bandwidth to be transferred directly to their LAN via standard Ethernet connections.

Graham Mclean of CI-Net said, “We’re providing an affordable alternative to conventional leased line Internet connections which are expensive to deliver in relatively rural areas such as Newmarket where large distances need to be dug up to lay cable.”

Mclean said further that those firms who can’t afford a leased line tend to go for the cheaper ADSL broadband which adds pressure to the broadband connection in that area – RedKite will hopefully solve this problem.

The RedKite service provides 99.9 per cent availability backed by a Service Level Agreement (SLA) that gives customers service credits if CI-Net fails to meet this performance.

RedKite is already available in ten UK locations, but will be introduced to Newmarket in the New Year.

“Some businesses choose RedKite as an additional connection alongside their wired service with automatic load balancing and failover. By having your wired service backed up by a separate wireless service you can build in true resilience and business continuity,” said Mclean.

http://tinyurl.com/6jamwq

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 20-Nov-08 09:51:31
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Where America leads, UK must surely follow.

OMS: We are not a telco, says Xohm

TELEPHONYONLINE Nov 19, 2008
By Kevin Fitchard

WiMAX operator sticks by its promise of open and unlimited access to mobile broadband


SAN FRANCISCO – A day before its ground-breaking deal with Clearwire is finalized, Xohm strategy vice president Rebecca Hanson was here at the Open Mobile Summit stumping for the new operator, insisting that the new Clearwire will be fundamentally different operator than its telco predecessors by offering—at least initially—unfettered and unlimited access to its wireless broadband network to any device and any service. It was a claim, however, that several in the audience were skeptical of, pressing Hanson to explain how any wireless network, no matter how spectrally efficient, could support the eventual capacity demands of millions of subscribers with no bandwidth or usage restrictions.

Sprint’s Xohm network uses WiMAX technology that is inherently more spectrally efficient than current 3G technologies, and the combined Xohm and Clearwire will have as much as 100 MHz of spectrum in many of their markets. But even though Clearwire has the capability of providing enormous amounts of capacity in its markets, achieving that potential would require enormous capital investments and operational costs. The question is whether Clearwire can justify those costs charging $25 to $55 a month to customers using the wireless network much like they would a DSL or cable modem at home.

“There may be a point where congestion on the network becomes an issue,” Hanson conceded, but she said Xohm and the new Clearwire will address that issue when and if it arises. By introducing bandwidth controls or data caps or limiting specific applications, Xohm would bring complexity and confusion to 3G wireless data models. “We don’t want to start off capping; we want to stay away from service tiers,” Hanson said. “We’re not requiring that of our customers out of the gate. It would undermine our commitment to simplicity and ease of use.”
On Thursday, the Clearwire board will vote on whether to approve the merger of Clearwire with Sprint’s WiMAX assets and operations—the final obstacle to the deal. The deal’s close will trigger a $3.2-billion investment from Google, Intel, Comcast, Time Warner and Bright House Networks, which the new Clearwire will use to start its nationwide network. Sprint has already launched a network in Baltimore under the Xohm brand, while Clearwire is running live WiMAX trials in Portland, Ore. The two companies, however, have already begun network construction in Chicago; Washington, D.C.; Las Vegas; Atlanta and Grand Rapids, Mich., all of which will be launched commercially between now and the end of the second quarter, the companies said, though there is now a question of whether the Grand Rapids network could be blocked by Sprint affiliate iPCS.

The two companies have operated as separate operators in the interim, and it’s still uncertain if the details of their service plans and business model will change when they combine. But based on Sprint’s launch in Baltimore, the new Clearwire would be very aggressive in challenging both wireline broadband operators as well as 3G operators. Xohm is charging $25 a month for a home broadband connection and $35 for a mobile connection, or pairing the two for $55, matching or undercutting the equivalent services offered by the ILEC s and mobile operators. In the case of the wireless operators, Xohm is not only undercutting their prices by $25 a month, but it is placing no restrictions on applications used or overall data consumed. Unlike the 3G operators, however, Xohm is nowhere near claiming nationwide coverage, a key selling point for mobile broadband services.

If the service proves successful, the new Clearwire could be faced with nightmarish congestion problems as more customers crowd the networks using bandwidth-intensive applications such as video streaming or peer-to-peer file sharing—the bane of the cable industry. Sprint and Clearwire haven’t spelled out specifically how they would manage such traffic surges, but in her keynote, Hanson gave some insight into how Clearwire’s operational model would give it some breathing room.

Much of the cost of delivering wireless broadband services to customers is unrelated to the operation of the network, she said. Clearwire will allow any device on its network, allowing the device manufacturers to market their wares themselves and sell through their own channels. Xohm doesn’t have to manage device skews, marketing or inventories; nor would it have to subsidize the devices. The service Xohm is supplying -- broadband access -- is much simpler than that of the wireless operators, she said. “By not taking ownership of those proprietary applications, the care and feeding requirement for our customers is much less,” she said.

Xohm also devotes all of its network resources to data. The majority of the 3G operators’ spectrum and infrastructure is still focused on its core voice services. Xohm has no voice business to protect, so there is no reason for it to restrict access to VoIP or devote resources to voice. Of course, by giving up on voice and those proprietary applications, Xohm also gives up on their revenue streams, but Hanson said that open model will eventually pay more dividends.
“We’re relinquishing some control, but we feel the opportunities it creates will outweigh any opportunity we give up,” Hanson said.

http://tinyurl.com/6c6m5o



NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Sat 22-Nov-08 23:13:42
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Contract renewal decision required next month. I suppose it will depend on NOW offering an inducement discount as last year.
Still no news of a service upgrade in the offing.
Nor has there been much information from rival Freedom4, since its well-publicised launch over 12 months ago.
F4 appears to have been bought by an outfit called Host Europe, in April this year and recently introduced a WiFi/3G dongle without any mention of WiMAX.
Incidentally, does anyone have access to statistics showing which Wireless ISP has the most customers in the UK?
Unlikely.

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 25-Nov-08 21:18:30
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Ha, believe it or not, I little knew in my last, that Freedom4 was about to break wind. Today's official Press Release in full at:

http://www.freedom4.com/pg.asp?p=press251108

I was wrong about it being sold to Host Europe though. Partly owned by Intel Capital.


NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 28-Nov-08 09:59:35
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
More about ramifications of Freedom4's development activity (although I understood that they already had obtained permission to vary the licence):-


WiMAX ROAMING SOLVES '3G CAPACITY CRUNCH'

By Peter Judge, Techworld
27 November 2008

Network equipment maker Airspan and operator Freedom4 have shown a laptop roaming seamlessly between WiMax networks on different spectrum bands. The companies say this will help operators build credible WiMax networks using limited radio spectrum, and give users an alternative when 3G networks run out of steam.

"To have a high capacity WiMax network in a market such as the UK, you need devices to do what ours does," said Graham Currier, chief operating officer of Freedom4, formerly known as Pipex Wireless. In the UK's much-delayed 2.6GHz spectrum auction, operators may only get 30 or 40MHz of spectrum, he said, which would not be enough to deliver the kinds of sustained data rate that users will expect. Dual-band roaming would allow these operators to buy wholesale data from other operators (in particular Freedom4, which has a large block of spectrum around 3.6GHz) and move users onto that spectrum as required.

Dual-band WiMax dongles are already available, but the Airspan demonstration shows that users can be placed on different spectrum under the control of the network operator, Currier explained: "We must consolidate lots of spectrum, to allow a network that delivers the kind of capacity. You need one device that can move to other spectrum without the awareness of the customer."

"This capability changes the ground rules for carriers," said Paul Senior, chief technical officer at Airspan. "Any prospective WiMax carrier can now create a large spectrum allocation for their deployment by combining smaller pieces of spectrum in different bands. This also allows carriers the ability to use larger allocations of spectrum per cell site (say 60 MHz, or even 120 MHz), and create sites with 100-200 Mbit/s of wide-area mobile broadband capacity."
"This would be roughly ten times the capacity of a typical 3G HSPA site," said Senior.

The technology should make European roaming easier said Currier: "Europe has a lot of historic, odd spectrum, and is very fragmented. If you want to have Europe-wide data mobility, almost every network has to work like ours."
Currier backed the comparison with 3G, saying dongles have failed to deliver the 7Mbit/s they promised, and yet they are still overloading the network: "The problem with 3G is in the air and the backhaul. The network was built for narrow band, and now users are downloading Doctor Who from iPlayer, on what is essentially a voice network. In London my calls have started dropping, and on the motorway, my phone drops calls between cells. Two years ago that didn't happen."

"I'm predicting that next year is going to see some fairly ugly examples of mobile broadband 'capacity crunch'," predicted Dean Bubley of Disruptive Analysis on his blog. "And given that capex budgets are going to be a bit thin, I reckon we'll see quite a few more dissatisfied customers."

Freedom4 still only has a trial in Stratford-on-Avon, and networks rolling out in Manchester, Milton Keynes and Warwick. The company is negotiating with Ofcom to change the conditions of its 3.6GHz fixed wireless licence to allow mobile WiMax. Despite this, Currier is confident he will have commercial service that can beat the mobile operators' 3G, and LTE when it arrives.

http://www.techworld.com/mobility/news/index.cfm?newsID=107674&pagtype=all


NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User Yardley
(experienced) Fri 28-Nov-08 13:41:55
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
In reply to:

(although I understood that they already had obtained permission to vary the licence):-




F4C have been claiming OFCOM are on the verge on amending their license for well over a year but only officially requested a change in February. I suspect OFCOM are delaying a decision until after the 2.5 GHz auction next year. In the latest company report, F4C admitted a fixed only service was not likely to be very successful, so the license variation is going to be key...

"The review also concluded that the JV should maintain its commitment to the limited fixed-only services launched in the three target markets in the first quarter. These have generated some encouraging “early adopter” interest, and will provide insight into the wireless broadband business model and the distribution/sales cycle in the SME sector. However it is unlikely that a fixed-only service will deliver significant traction in the market, and marketing should remain low-key until a broader range of services is available. The re-focusing of the roll-out strategy for the business has been implemented during the course of the third quarter of 2008.

Mobile WiMAX
In February 2008 the JV initiated a process to amend its 3.6GHz spectrum licence to enable it to offer nomadic and mobile services."
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 28-Nov-08 22:53:31
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Yardley] [link to this post]
 
Thank you for your clarification. However, it seems rather unfair that this aditional facility should be withheld from Freedom4, when the mobile extension to existing licences has already been awarded to UK Broadband (NOW)?

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User Yardley
(experienced) Sat 29-Nov-08 00:53:26
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
No worries.

The key might be in the fact that unlike UKB's license, F4's had a clause about satellite interference. Way back in November 2007 when UKB were awarded their license variation, El Reg had an article including a quote from an internal UKB email having a pop at F4: link

It's interesting that although F4 apparently were in negotiations with OFCOM in 2007, they didn't formally request a change 'till Feb 2008. I suspect any decision has been delayed until after the 2.5GHz auction - the value of which would decrease if another nationwide mobile license were granted.
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 03-Dec-08 10:32:17
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Yardley] [link to this post]
 
Low Power Showdown
By Kevin Fitchard Nov 17, 2008

The WiMAX industry still may have a long way to go to make chipsets cheap enough before they'll wind up in everyday consumer electronics, but as far as power consumption is concerned, WiMAX is doing just fine. Research Group WiMAX 2020 conducted the WiMAX Low Power CPE Shootout last month at WiMAX World to gauge whether WiMAX chipset vendors really could meet their claims of low-power mobile technology. The vendors — at least the two that participated — passed with flying colors.

WiMAX 2020 decided to benchmark WiMAX offerings against current 3G solutions under the assumption that initial expectations will demand that WiMAX devices at least match the power profiles of smartphones, said Haig Sarkissian, analyst and Shootout moderator for WiMAX 2020. WiMAX 2020 set a benchmark of six hours of voice time and six hours of Internet browsing as benchmarks — one hour better in both categories than the iPhone, which routinely outperforms other smartphones in power consumption.

GCT, submitting a USB dongle embedded with its chipset, managed to meet the voice benchmark and exceed the data benchmark by an hour. Altair Semiconductor, which submitted a digital circuit board because its chipset is not embedded in any commercial products yet, far surpassed the benchmarks, achieving 9.5 hours of voice-over-IP talk time and more than 14 hours of Internet usage.

Sarkissian said the differences between the two vendors' chipsets are mainly in development. GCT is supplying silicon for commercial products today, which primarily encompasses independent customer premises equipment with external power sources, while Altair is focusing on the future embedded market, which requires ultra-low-power solutions, and has designed its platform specifically to meet those requirements. The fact that both vendors are meeting these benchmarks today, however, is significant, he said.

“We are where we need to be compared to 3G,” Sarkissian said. “We're even ahead. The difference is 3G works for six hours but gives you a low bit rate. The WiMAX solutions are working for six hours but at a much higher bit rate. In that sense, we're far ahead.”

TESTING BATTERY LIFE OVER WIMAX
WiMAX 2020 tested GCT and Altair's WiMAX chipsets to see if they could match a six-hour benchmark for power consumption common to 3G. Here is how they performed:

Usage mode:
VoIP talk time GCT 6.1 hours Altair 7 hours
Internet browsing GCT 9.5 hours Altair 14 hours

Source: WiMAX 2020
http://telephonyonline.com/wimax/news/telecom_lowpower_showdown

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 03-Dec-08 10:51:35
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
30MHz is not enough, says Digicel
03/12/2008

For WiMAX operators to have any chance of business case success, the WiMAX Forum recommends that a 30MHz chunk of spectrum should be the minimum allocation.

Yet Digicel, a GSM operator with operations in over 30 countries - and the largest mobile operator in the Caribbean - believes that 30MHz is not nearly enough. Having already deployed  802.16d and 802.16e WiMAX networks in Grand Cayman and Jamaica, and with plans to extend its WiMAX presence still further, the Digicel strategy is to  complement its GSM operations by becoming the 'third pipe'  alternative to leased line, ADSL, cable and LTE.

But while Digicel aims to offer corporate services and a mass market consumer offering via WiMAX, for fixed and nomadic broadband services (with plans to move to full mobility over WiMAX later), its ambitions could be thwarted by a lack of spectrum. "Unless we get 50-60MHz, it's going to be hard to justify the business plan," says Magnus Johansson, head of Broadband at the Digicel Group, speaking at the special focus day on regulatory issues at the Latin American WIMAX Congress event held in Rio de Janeiro, organised by Informa Telecoms & Media on behalf of the WiMAX Forum.

Johansson argues that regulators need to rethink their spectrum allocation strategy if they are to fulfil their goals of stimulating competition and driving broadband adoption. "I'm not just talking on behalf of Digicel," Johansson told WiMAX Vision. "This has wider importance."

Given the tendency of regulators to slice and dice spectrum, usually through an auction process, Johansson's proposals sound radical. Ideally, he would like the 2.5GHz frequency band - which contains 190MHz of spectrum - to be split into a maximum of only two contiguous blocks. The 2.3GHz band, which has 60MHz, he would like to see handed out in one contiguous block.

"For countries with low fixed line penetration and vision for universal access, the regulator should not enact arbitrary spectrum caps which could impede an operator's ability to compete, or render the business case and investment too risky to pursue," argues Johansson.

http://www.wimax-vision.com/newt/l/wimaxvision/article_view.html?artid=20017596419



NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 08-Dec-08 21:27:07
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
ERICSSON: No UK LTE Network Before End of 2010

Natasha Lomas CNET NEWS 26 Nov 2008

LTE, or the long-term evolution of 3G, has been widely regarded as the heir apparent to today's cellular network standards for some time. However, any rollout of a next-generation mobile network in the UK is still years away, according to telecoms-kit maker Ericsson's UK chief technology officer, John Cunliffe.

"I would say probably the end of 2010 at the very earliest," he told ZDNet UK sister site silicon.com, "Networks will be ready for rolling out — shipping in commercial quantities — next year and then the devices, we think, will start to come in 2010," he added.

According to analyst firm ABI Research, multi-mode WiMax/LTE chipsets will be available from 2009 and, by 2013, 32 million consumers will be signed up to the networks.

There remain, however, many unknowns in LTE's roadmap, not least how much it will cost to build a network — something likely to give operators pause for thought, especially in the current economic climate.

Cunliffe would not give an estimate on how much a commercial rollout of LTE in the UK might cost. "People need to do more modelling around rollout costs," he said. "It's a new equation."

However, he claimed operators switching to LTE would reap the benefits of "total lower capex and lower opex", provided they are willing to stump up the infrastructure cash.

Cunliffe also noted that that any large-scale deployment of rival 4G technology WiMax would also require similar investment in infrastructure to that of an LTE deployment. "If you think about WiMax starting off as essentially a radio, you need a much bigger ecosystem around it," he said.

"By the time you actually deliver a service, the operators still have to pay for the infrastructure that goes around it and they've still got their opex — their people costs and so on — so the WiMax piece — the radio piece — is actually a small piece of the equation. In terms of the maturity of the 3GPP ecosystem, it's well ahead of where WiMax is," he said.

Another aspect to consider when it comes to mobile's 4G future is how much existing 3.5G services can be milked, as the potential speeds for HSPA [high-speed packet access or 3.5G] are pretty impressive. Cunliffe noted: "We often forget that HSPA has a roadmap which will take it higher than the current speeds."

"The fastest being deployed in the UK at the moment is 7.2Mbps but our roadmap continues until 42Mbps. We can even see that it may be possible for the technology to reach as much as 80Mbps… so there is certainly a lot of mileage in HSPA… People maybe think that we've got to have LTE to get to the higher speeds, but HSPA will go a long way before we need to get to LTE speeds," said Cunliffe.

Cunliffe added that the top speed of LTE currently being demoed by Ericsson in lab conditions is 160Mbps and a drive test has reached a maximum of 154Mbps, with an average of 78Mbps.

Once an LTE network is up and running, Cunliffe said increasing demand for on-demand video services could mean some local media content caching could be required to keep up with users' thirst for YouTube and BBC iPlayer.

"On-demand video does put a lot of pressure on the backhaul and the core networks, and will increasingly put pressure on them, but there are solutions which scale, which will accommodate it," he said.

Cunliffe said the biggest hurdles to a UK LTE network being rolled out are timing — when operators will switch, especially those with significant investment in HSPA — as well as the perpetual issue of return on investment.

"Obviously there will be questions about return on investment," he said.

http://tinyurl.com/6xdp38

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 10-Dec-08 11:21:34
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
SHOULD CABLE OPERATORS OFFER WIRELESS?

At least one Wall Street stock jock thinks it's a dumb idea...

BroadbandReports.com
By Karl Bode
09 12 2008

If you remember, Comcast CEO Brian Roberts was never really sold on offering wireless, aka the fourth component on top of TV, data and VOIP in a "quadruple play" offering to consumers. That's despite participating in a group that paid $2.4 billion for broadband wireless spectrum, and now doling out more than a billion to help Clearwire deploy Mobile WiMax. At least one Wall Street analyst agrees with Roberts; Craig "network upgrades are for ninnies" Moffett making a lot of noise this week about how the quadruple play is an idiotic and unnecessary move for cable operators:

"The power of bundles, after all, has little if anything to do with what customers want,” Moffett wrote today in a research report. "And it has nothing whatsoever to do with what competitors are offering. Bundles are about the network. Bundles are about supply, not demand. The power of the bundle arises from the marginal costs of delivery. In other words, it's the network, stupid."
Moffett does seem really keen on Cablevision's plan to spend $300 million on a combination project that involves upgrading to DOCSIS 3.0* -- but also offering free Wi-Fi to all of their customers.
"Their model is to pay for the WiFi network by, well, giving it away," Moffett said. "The $300 million of capital spending required to build it, and the modest operating costs to run it, can be paid for with just a small uplift in market share – either gained or retained – in their wired broadband service. At a an ARPU of $35 per month and 80% contribution margins for wired broadband, it would take only 160,000 incremental subscribers – just 3.6% share of their cable footprint – to earn a 10% return on investment."
Of course, this is the same guy who thinks FiOS** is doomed to failure and Qwest's plan to milk copper is the pinnacle of telecom achievement, both driven by a lack of vision and lust for immediate returns. Other analysts aren't quite as quick to poo-poo cable operators bundling wireless, noting that operations like Pivot failed because they simply weren't very good. Cox apparently doesn't agree with Moffett -- the now private cable operator recently announcing they plan to become an EVDO (and potentially LTE) wireless carrier sometime within the next few years.
*Data over Cable System
**Fiber Optic Service (to the Home)

http://www.broadbandreports.com/shownews/Should-Cable-Operators-Offer-Wireless-99567

NOW Wireless Internet
The exclusive club for believers in a better future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Support is Free
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 19-Dec-08 11:50:45
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Please be aware that the Now Network referred to below, no longer has any connection with the UK Broadband service that a few of us know & love.

SPRINT EXTENDS 4G LEADERSHIP WITH NATION'S FIRST 3G/4G DUAL-MODE MOBILE BROADBAND SERVICE
Overland Park Kansas 17.12.08

SPRINT is about to make wireless history again by bringing the mobile broadband future to its customers now. The 4G leader announced it will make the first 3G/4G dual-mode device, which operates on both the Sprint 3G and 4G networks, available in retail stores Dec. 21.
The ultimate wireless broadband device delivers both 3G and 4G, revolutionizing mobile broadband and giving customers the best of both worlds

The Sprint 3G/4G USB Modem U300 delivers the power of the Now Network(TM), the nation's largest and most dependable mobile broadband 3G network*, while also harnessing the turbocharged speeds of WiMAX on the new Sprint 4G network. Sprint launched 4G in Baltimore in September and plans to launch in other markets across the country throughout 2009. This versatile device will enable customers to experience blazing fast Internet access, greater productivity and enhanced multimedia quality throughout 4G markets, and offer access to the dependable Sprint 3G network virtually everywhere else. The 3G/4G USB modem represents another major development in truly un-tethered broadband access.

"Sprint intends to be the leader in 4G and bring the wireless Internet to life," said Dan Hesse, Sprint CEO. "This first-of-its-kind device allows our customers to take the Internet with them essentially wherever they go by gaining enhanced speed and capability in 4G markets and the nationwide coverage of our 3G network across the rest of the country."

Sprint 4G represents a shift in the way people will use mobile broadband. Businesses, consumers and governments will be able to extend their Internet experience beyond home or office use. For the business customer, a typical user experience might be the ability to participate in a video conference from anywhere within the coverage area in a Sprint 4G city while sharing and retrieving large data files in just seconds. For consumers, it might be the ability to download a song in several seconds or a movie in significantly less than an hour while in the park or moving through the city, three to five times faster than 3G networks. The Sprint 3G/4G USB modem will access mobile multimedia applications at average downlink speeds of 2-4 Mbps within Baltimore Sprint 4G service areas. Where Sprint 4G service has yet to launch, the dual-mode device will operate on the Nationwide Sprint Mobile Broadband 3G Network at average downlink speeds of 600 Kbps - 1.4 Mbps.

The Sprint 3G/4G USB Modem U300, manufactured by Franklin Wireless, is a sleek, easy-to-use data card which connects to a standard USB port. The device is priced at $149.99 with a two-year subscriber agreement, after a $50 mail-in-rebate. Beginning Dec. 21, customers can purchase the USB data card via the Sprint direct business sales force, at most Baltimore-area Sprint stores and at select Baltimore-area retailers. Starting in January, the device will also be available in Baltimore-area Best Buy stores. With the Sprint 3G/4G USB Modem, customers living in and traveling to Baltimore will be able to work even faster while on-the-go. For $79.99 - just a $20 premium on any mobile broadband connection plan - customers will have simple-to-use access to the best possible mobile broadband connection: 3G or 4G. The Sprint Connection Manager recognizes and connects to the fastest connection available. For more information, visit www.sprint.com/4g

"The availability of this first dual-mode mobile broadband device further demonstrates Sprint's leadership in 3G and 4G services," said Todd Rowley, vice president of Sprint 4G. "Our future device portfolio of single-mode 4G devices, embedded 4G laptops and dual- mode 3G/4G devices will continue to demonstrate our commitment to WiMAX."

Sprint is the first and only national wireless carrier to offer customers its 4G network and 3G network on one device. As 4G service continues to roll out in other cities, Sprint customers with dual-mode devices will be ready to take advantage of its super-fast speeds and will ultimately experience new forms of interactive communications, high- speed mobile Internet browsing, social-networking tools, local and location-centric products and services and city-wide broadband access to multimedia services including music, video, mobile TV and on-demand products.

About Sprint Nextel
Sprint Nextel offers a comprehensive range of wireless and wireline communications services bringing the freedom of mobility to consumers, businesses and government users. Sprint Nextel is widely recognized for developing, engineering and deploying innovative technologies, including two wireless networks serving nearly 51 million customers at the end of the third quarter 2008; industry-leading mobile data services; instant national and international push-to-talk capabilities; and a global Tier 1 Internet backbone. For more information, visit www.sprint.com

About Franklin Wireless
Franklin Wireless Corp. designs and markets wireless broadband high speed data communication products such as 3rd generation ("3G") and 4th generation ("4G") wireless broadband modules and modems to end users and wireless companies in North and South American countries. It markets its products through original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and distributors, as well as directly to operators and end users in North and South America. The company was founded in 1982 and is headquartered in San Diego, California. For more information about Franklin Wireless, please visit www.franklinwireless.com

* Largest based on square miles (including roaming). Dependable based on independent, third-party drive tests on 3G data connection success, session reliability, and signal strength for the 50 most populous markets from March through September 2008.


SPRINT MOBILE BROADBAND WITH 4G
Now available in Baltimore.

With the new Sprint 3G/4G USB Modem U300, you can turbo charge your mobile broadband connection for even faster email and Internet access, and uploads and downloads within the Baltimore area — all while taking your business to greater speeds and productivity than ever before. Plus, you'll enjoy the nationwide coverage of the 3G Sprint Mobile Broadband Network when travelling outside of Baltimore.

In addition to the Sprint 3G/4G USB Modem U300, look for more new 3G/4G products as Sprint 4G service becomes available in more US cities.

Key Features: Sprint 3G/4G USB Modem U300
High-speed data transfer
Employs authentication and identification system for top-notch security
Compatible with Windows Vista/XP/2000
Easy installation with included CD
Supports over-the-air software updates
Hands-free activation
Internal antenna
Rotating USB connector
GPS services on the Sprint Mobile Broadband Network (not Sprint 4G)

Technical Specifications
Super-fast 4G speeds (average download speeds of 2-4 Mbps) in Baltimore today, and soon in other major cities.
3G speeds (average download speeds of 600Kbps – 1.4 Mbps) across the nationwide Sprint Mobile Broadband Network
Backwards compatible to the Sprint EV-DO/Rev 0 and 1XRTT networks
Dimensions: 1.28 x 3.6 x 0.48 inches
Weight: 44g

Currently, the Sprint 3G/4G USB Modem U300 is available exclusively in the Baltimore area, with new locations to be added in the coming months.

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 19-Dec-08 12:14:47
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Global Wireless Conflict Continues:-


TELECOM WAR ENTERS 3G/WIMAX SPACE

The Economic Times
16 Dec 2008
By Rashmi Pratap

MUMBAI: Round one of the telecom technology war has gone to the GSM platform, with CDMA taking the backseat. A second war for supremacy is brewing between the soon-to-be-launched 3G and WiMax technologies. Both are platforms for providing high-speed internet on mobile, enabling video calls, movie downloads and other multimedia applications on mobiles.

The differences between the two technologies are coming to the fore ahead of the spectrum auction next month. Ericsson - the biggest supporter and equipment vendor of 3G - is laying claims on the 2.3 GHz spectrum band, which is meant for WiMax in India.

On the other hand, WiMax Forum, the international body supporting the deployment of WiMax, says that it has products certified for use in that band, which is most spectral efficient for offering high-speed internet on mobile.

WiMax stands for Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access. It can also be used to provide voice services and rivals 3G as both the platforms are used for similar applications. 3G, however, is considered to be voice-centric and may be used for easing network congestion before high-end data services can be offered.

According to the Indian Department of Telecom, the 2.1 GHz band spectrum will be used for 3G, while 2.3 GHz and 2.5 GHz have been earmarked for Broadband Wireless Access (BWA), which is considered synonymous with WiMax.

http://tinyurl.com/4935vb

And:-

LTE IS SHUTTING WIMAX'S OPPORTUNITY WINDOW

Wireless Asia
Dec 19, 2008
By Steven Hartley & Julien Grivolas

T-Mobile USA recently announced that it is to skip evolution of HSPA and go straight to LTE, bypassing HSPA+. The announcement is a further sign of the growing operator momentum behind LTE, and increasing marginalisation of mobile Wimax. However, opportunities for mobile Wimax and HSPA+ should not be overlooked.

T-Mobile USA's announcement is not a surprise in itself. As a GSM-based operator it was always likely that it would migrate to LTE. However, the fact that it is another major global operator giving full public backing to LTE means that mobile Wimax is becoming increasingly marginalised as a long-term, mass-market option.

Globally, operators from across the current technology divides are coalescing behind LTE (for example, Verizon Wireless in the US and NTT DoCoMo in Japan). The 'New Clearwire' is now the only large-scale operator to pin its hopes on mobile Wimax, and Qualcomm has dropped development of its UMB technology.

This momentum is reflected in our recently updated forecasts. By 2013 we forecast that there will be almost as many LTE connections worldwide (37.8 million) as mobile Wimax (42.4 million), despite mobile Wimax's two-year head start. The window of opportunity for mobile Wimax is closing rapidly. We predict that after the end of the forecast period, LTE connections will rapidly surpass mobile Wimax.

Wimax not redundant - yet
Operators need to take a pragmatic approach to network evolution, so a 'LTE versus mobile Wimax' view of the world is over-simplistic. For example, Telenor has purchased spectrum in Norway to use mobile Wimax to provide fixed wireless broadband services to rural communities not served by DSL. And last month, HTC released a dual-mode GSM-Wimax device for Wimax operator Scartel in Russia.

Furthermore, operators need to take a market-by-market approach. Maximising economies of scale for equipment orders makes financial sense at one level, but could be counter-productive if market conditions are inappropriate. For instance, Vodafone is yet to declare its allegiance to a single technology but already has a fixed Wimax solution in Malta in addition to its HSPA network. However, it is highly likely that LTE will be the dominant technology at Vodafone for the evolution of its mobile networks, given CEO Vittorio Colao's desire to deepen the relationship with Verizon Wireless in the US and the latter's plan to migrate to LTE.

Don't ignore HSPA+
It is important to note that the above figures are for 2013. In the meantime our forecasts emphasise the fact that HSPA will be the most dominant high-speed wireless data technology for the next five years. Even in 2013 the installed base will have grown to such an extent that 79% of high-speed connections (HSPA, LTE, CDMA EVDO and mobile Wimax) will be HSPA.
The T-Mobile announcement, therefore, does little to change our conviction in relation to the opportunities for operators to extend the lifespan of their HSPA networks by migrating to LTE via HSPA+. Indeed, HSPA+ gives operators additional flexibility to adopt the migratory path best suited to their needs. Telstra in Australia and StarHub in Singapore have opted for HSPA+ Release 7 64QAM, which offers maximum theoretical downlink speeds of 21Mbps. HSPA+ Release 7 2x2 MIMO, supporting 28 Mbps, is currently being considered by Softbank in Japan. Operators could also opt for HSPA+ Release 8 with 42 Mbps, or leap straight to LTE.

Many factors will dictate an operator's final network evolution path. These include competitive landscape, spectrum availability and legacy network to name but a few. Although LTE continues to gain momentum, operators still have plenty of network migration options available.

Ovum
Steven Hartley is senior analyst on the Mobile Analyst Team
Julien Grivolas is principal analyst in the Telecoms Group

http://www.telecomasia.net/article.php?type=article&id_article=11807


A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 29-Dec-08 18:14:20
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Sad to announce that, as of today, I have cancelled my subscription to NOW Wireless Internet (0.5MB), having successfully signed up with O2 ADSL (up to 8MB) at less cost. A significantly faster comnnection has been achieved despite having a very archaic BT installation and with the free Wireless/Router/Modem, positioned some distance from our main BT box.
Apparently trials of new technology by UK Broadband are NOW close to completion.

WHAT EVERY RF ENGINEER SHOULD KNOW ABOUT OFDM & WIMAX

RF Designline
12/27/2008
By Janine Love

OFDM and WiMAX are hot topics on the RF DesignLine, so I had a virtual "sit down" with some leaders in the industry to see where the technology is, and where they think it is going. The following article includes some of the thoughts and remarks of How-Siang Yap, Agilent EEsof EDA Product Marketing; David Hall, Product Manager, RF & Communications National Instruments; Paul Argent, Business Manager WiMAX, Aeroflex Wireless; and Carla Feldman, Marketing Manager, Wireless Business Unit Agilent Technologies.

RFDL: What is the status of the technology?
Yap:OFDM is a mature modulation technology used in wireless and wired digital data transmission such as WLAN, WiMAX, ADSL, Powerline, digital TV and digital radio.

Argent:The establishment of industry-wide standards for WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) is enabling both service providers and technology vendors to make commitments to the technology. Operators all over the world are beginning to focus on the commercial opportunities presented by WiMAX technology. Component vendors, infrastructure vendors, and device manufacturers are each playing a role to advance the development and commercialization of WiMAX.

Hall: One continuing trend in the wireless communications industry is the emergence of MIMO-OFDM in the physical layers of new communication standards. In fact, the presence of MIMO-OFDM in the physical layer of protocols such as WiMAX, 3GPP LTE, and IEEE 802.11n is the direct result of consumer demands for higher data rates without consuming more channel bandwidth. It is likely that MIMO-OFDM will continue as the fundamental backbone of future broadband communications technologies.

Feldman:There is no doubt that WiMAX(OFDMA) and 3GPP LTE will continue to have a significant and lasting impact on the communications industry in 2009. R&D spending in LTE, for example, has already begun ramping up from chipset development to components and integrated hardware. The same can be said of the technologies that go into making an LTE system work such as MIMO and DigRF V4-the latest version of the DigRF electronics interface standard for the cellular market.

RFDL: How do you see market opportunities?
Hall: Up until now, most WiMAX deployments have been of the IEEE 802.16d (fixed) variety as a method to deploy broadband Internet. The year 2009 will likely see continued deployment of fixed WiMAX for broadband Internet both in emerging economies that lack the communications infrastructure, and in urban environments. With most cellular handset manufacturers predicting flat unit growth in 2009, it seems likely that the growth of new WiMAX-enabled handsets will help to offset the inevitable decline in unit profit margins.

Argent:WiMAX is picking up momentum and is looking poised to become part of your personal gadgets like laptop computers, personal media players, PDA devices and eventually mobile phones. Indication of WiMAX growth is the development in the WiMAX semiconductor market and the announcement of Certified Base Station and Mobile Station devices from leading equipment vendors. Market researchers endorse that WiMAX is entering its seminal year with more than 200 infrastructure deployments underway and more advanced WiMAX capable mobile platforms expected from leading vendors in 2009.

Feldman:While WiMAX and LTE will continue to dominate the industry as "killer apps" in 2009, at Agilent we also see the emergence of femtocells and other technologies getting traction. As service providers work to establish the mobile device as the home's central communication device, deployment of femtocells will likely garner increasing attention for their ability to help increase home coverage and cell site capacity.

Yap:OFDM/WiMax will continue to grow with the rise of internet usage to provide convenient wide area wireless broadband access without the need for cable or DSL wiring. However, for mobile applications, it faces competition from LTE (Long Term Evolution) which provides lower battery power consumption and less stringent power amplifier requirements which translates to more affordable broadband mobile handsets.

RFDL: What do you wish every RF engineer knew about this topic?
Hall: No matter who wins the WiMAX versus LTE race, all engineers in the wireless communications industry need to better understand the basic fundamentals of MIMO-OFDM systems. In addition, with increasing market pressure to reduce unit cost, test engineers need to gain more expertise in techniques to reduce measurement time.

Feldman:As RF engineers push the limits of these new technologies, measurement companies will also be driven to push the limits of test and measurement in support of their efforts. For instance, the 802.16 standard on which Mobile WiMAX is based specifies a tight Error Vector Magnitude (EVM) requirement (-31 dB, based on a 1% packet error rate). Meeting this target requires that all system blocks be more linear and phase noise be considerably better than in an 802.11 design.

Argent:RF optimization is always a challenge with a new technology, a design is never complete until it has been superseded by a more advanced feature set or optimized version. WiMAX has an abundance of optional features/techniques including advanced antenna solutions such as downlink 2x2 MIMO, uplink Interference Rejection Combining (IRC) reception, uplink collaborative MIMO and beamforming that can greatly improve performance. If every RF WiMAX engineer employed the precise mix of WiMAX optional features, advanced signaling processing and smart antenna techniques, WiMAX technology is capable of delivering world-leading wireless broadband performance.

http://www.eetimes.com/news/latest/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=212700038


A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User fabyon
(committed) Tue 30-Dec-08 03:22:27
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
I will miss your posts RadioJock you always found these juicy snippets of information. I trialled Now in West London over two years ago but soon realised for the money I would get so much better. It would have been fun to use it as a back up service on a dual wan router but with the mobile operators offering dongles that seem a savvier option if a good signal can be received.

I believe NOW missed the boat big time and sat on a goldmine, they weren't quick to offer higher speeds or at least cheaper packages.



BE* - AOL byoa (no longer available)
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 30-Dec-08 08:43:49
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: fabyon] [link to this post]
 
Thanks fabyon for that (rare) reponse. I am certain that Mr Li is doing quite nicely from selling backhaul at present, without bothering about the inevitable decrease in patronage by joe public, since closing the service to new users. There will remain a small number of customers dwelling in long-term tenancies without a phone line. Eventually, market forces should lead to a decision about the future of NOW.
Meanwhile, here is a news item saved for the holiday, because its such a long read.

WiMAX GETS DOWN TO BUSINESS
Chasing the Consumer Is Not the Only — or the Safest — Play

Xchange Magazine

Tara Seals 19/11/08

WiMAX has been a player in the business market for some time now, but never really enjoyed the high-profile hype-machine treatment that the idea of 4G for the consumer has gotten. WiMAX carriers Sprint-Nextel Corp. and Clearwire Corp. have led the way in terms of fomenting the dialogue around the technology, and the main point goes something like this: consumer services, consumer electronics and content’s long tail will redefine communications as we know it. Right? Well, no one really knows, though it sounds good on paper. The proven model is actually one that doesn’t get much coverage: WiMAX for businesses.

Consider this statement, which is a rarity in today’s environment: “We are growing rapidly, with very low churn and a lot of happy customers,” said Jeff Thompson, president and CEO at Towerstream Corp., which provides three flavors of WiMAX to the upper end of the small-medium business market. “We predicted 15 percent sequential growth guidance for the last quarter, and came in at 20 percent, with record low churn. There is immense opportunity here.”

It’s also a model that is in the middle of an evolution, as 802.16e WiMAX is deployed, offering the possibility of mobile or portable business applications.

The Basic Case for the Business Market

And where, exactly, is that opportunity right now? It sounds simple on the surface: it starts with wireline replacement.
New data from TeleGeography’s WiMAX Research Service reveals that WiMAX deployments are gaining momentum around the globe. The number of commercial WiMAX networks grew 82 percent between the third quarter of 2007 and the third quarter of 2008, from 69 to 126. This growth has been distributed around the world: the number of commercial WiMAX networks increased by 100 percent or more in Latin America, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Growth was slowest in Central and Eastern Europe, where the pace of new network launches slowed to 38 percent. However, this slowdown should prove to be short-lived: while 18 operators now provide WiMAX service in the region, 22 companies are building WiMAX networks, and another 10 have commenced field trials.

ABI Research analyst Phil Solis said WiMAX primarily is being used as a replacement for fixed Internet access at the moment, whether that be copper or fiber. “The primary benefits are the speed at which service can be installed — a day instead of 30 to 90 days — and competitive pricing,” he explained. “This can be used as a primary connection, but in many cases serves as a great backup connection in the event of fiber cuts or other disruptions to service.”

Thompson said being cheaper than the LEC is a must in order to compete (Towerstream comes in at about half the wired cost, Thompson said), and that wireless is obviously a fit for areas out of reach for high-end copper or fiber. But an additional driver for Towerstream’s growth is the rise of enhanced applications in the SMB market.

“Let me just say, video, video, video, and that’s across the board,” he noted. “Any Web site you visit is pushing video out to you, it seems. Companies are flying less and having more video meetings. Online video is a large part of presentations now. Plenty of media companies are pushing rich media back and forth. And a T1 just isn’t sufficient anymore for a lot of these businesses — video is making that antiquated.”

In addition to a 10mbps-1gbps offer for the top end and a 5mbps and below T1 replacement, Towerstream offers a midrange 8mbps product for SMBs whose bandwidth needs are really starting to accelerate, but who either can’t afford or don’t quite need a second T1. The offer accounts for about 40 percent of Towerstream’s new sales over the last three quarters. “So that’s more than a T1, less than two T1s, and it’s highly affordable,” Thompson explained. “That’s a message that just translates. Companies don’t care if that secure, reliable bandwidth is delivered by wire or over the air — zeros and ones are just zeros and ones.”

Advantages of 802.16e

The replacement market is one safe area of opportunity, but using the mobility-focused 802.16e version of WiMAX gives operators an even greater prospect.
For one thing, the CPE situation takes on a better proposition, since it is this version of WiMAX that most vendors are focused on developing going forward. There’s a groundswell of support for embedded WiMAX. “By using 802.16e now, WISPs might be able to leverage that for portable use — such as leveraging laptops with WiMAX USB modems or built-in WiMAX miniCards inside the laptop,” said Solis of ABI Research. “As far as their typical service though, they would be able to offer even faster set-ups using modems placed by windows as opposed to outdoor modems that must be mounted.”

Thompson added that there’s a cost advantage to 802.16e as well. “If every device starts shipping with embedded WiMAX chips and more networks are subsequently deployed, the runs for global players go up and the cost comes down. The standardization and scale potentially involved here — not found in 3G — will have a profound impact on the economics of rolling this out for providers. It allows us to enjoy the economies of scale that the large companies have, while at the same time driving the costs down of the devices for the customer.” He cited the fact that Wi-Fi is not even a choice anymore in notebooks, “and when you have dual-mode Wi-Fi/WiMAX chips as they're starting to do now, it’s a big game-changer.”

Towerstream was using the fixed version of WiMAX but this fall went mobile in Chicago, delivering 802.16e WiMAX service to businesses in the downtown Loop area, with plans to upgrade the rest of its markets as needed. As for equipment, Towerstream uses Alvarion Ltd.’s WiMAX Forum-certified BreezeMAX 2500 equipment for the 2.5GHz frequency.

It may be the most high-profile, but Towerstream is not the only business-focused WISP embracing WiMAX. Wisper High Speed Internet said this fall that it plans to offer mobile WiMAX services across Minnesota. Wisper said it will increase coverage and services over the next two years to all types of businesses (and residences) with a whopping 600 percent capacity growth, by offering both voice and data services to more than 550,000 people in the area using Alvarion’s BreezeMAX 3650 for the 3.65GHz frequency.

ERF Wireless, meanwhile, has obtained a nationwide license for operation in the 3.65GHz WiMAX band and is partnering with undisclosed “entities” (Sprint? Clearwire?) that will make additional licensed spectrum available in the 2.5GHz band. ERF is evaluating equipment, and plans to deploy the network first in order to wholesale to WISPs and to serve oil and gas markets across Texas, New Mexico and Louisiana, where the company aggressively is expanding its wireless footprint. Oil and gas companies tend to drill in remote areas and rarely have access to wired alternatives in a cost effective manner.

"The adoption of WiMAX technology is a critical part of our current network expansion strategy," said ERF Wireless CEO Dean Cubley. "We've been monitoring the progress of WiMAX technology for some time, and until now we've felt that the cost and maturity of the technology were not favorable for large-scale network deployment. However, in the past six months, there have been some dramatic improvements in both the technology and its cost-effectiveness.

What About the Future?

Clearly, the business opportunity reads in a much different manner from the consumer vision, which is applications-focused rather than connectivity-focused. But because 802.16e supports mobile deployments, it also allows for new business models down the line.

For instance, while Towerstream is “not looking to be a mobile operator,” Thompson acknowledged that the move to 802.16e future-proofs the network. “Once you have this mobility-capable metro network that is basically an umbrella of high-speed connectivity, there are plenty of applications for that in business, like workers at remote sites walking about with notebooks,” said Thompson.

Portability, as Solis noted, can bring a lot of new opportunity. Consider, for instance, mobile businesses, like food carts, street vendors, even bloodmobiles. These types of mobile endeavors often need or want one or more of the following: credit card transactions, e-mail, Internet connectivity, chain applications for replenishing inventory on a just-in-time basis, mapping/GPS functionality, sales force automation, and/or the ability to take readings on water and gas levels in fleet vehicles.

All of that can, in theory, be enabled today with Wi-Fi, but it’s an inelegant solution. There’s also satellite, which tends to be expensive, considering one essentially is sending traffic 22,000 miles up to the Clark Belt band, where geostationary satellites orbit. These types of mobile, ad hoc or generally untethered businesses can really benefit from mobile WiMAX, which offers in-the-air and everywhere broadband.

There’s also an opportunity for WISPs tapping the business market to leverage applications. For instance, consider a digital signage opportunity: A pixel screen mounted on the side of a food cart could be rented out as a billboard.

“We foresee the ability to deliver an entirely new user environment,” explained Paul Brody, a partner with IBM Global Business Services and the leader of the global electronics industry strategy practice at IBM. “But the business models need to change incrementally.” That said, change they must, because what’s the point of building a 4G network unless you’re going to change the business models fundamentally.

The Trouble with the Consumer Market

This fall the first commercial 4G market on the Sprint-Nextel Corp. WiMAX network went live in Baltimore, and with it began an era that many have been feverishly hoping will be application- and consumer-electronics focused. That’s the idea, anyway: that a blanket of pervasive wireless broadband — and an accompanying universe of WiMAX-ready devices that you can buy in any retail electronics store — will completely change how consumers use communications. For operators, business models will become about third-party applications, leveraging network and subscriber information for value-adds, and advertising.

But there are problems with that coming to fruition anytime soon, which leaves glaring issues in the business model for now. For instance, Sprint’s deployment of WiMAX is actually not very different at the moment — aside from offering higher speeds — than the subscription and application approach taken with its 3G counterpart, EV-DO Rev. A, because WiMAX devices other than laptops and handsets (like cameras, gaming devices, televisions, outdoor billboards, cars, digital photo frames, personal digital signage panels, refrigerators, sunglasses, watches, etc.) aren’t even close to commercial. It’s still a flat-rate data plan for basic broadband access.

Then there’s the uncertainly involved from a technology perspective. LTE and WiMAX are the de facto 4G options left out there since the official demise of Ultra-Mobile Broadband. While In-Stat expects mobile WiMAX ultimately will outpace LTE over the next few years due to timing of network rollouts (next year would be the absolute earliest for any commercialization of LTE), the research firm finds that neither are quite gelled, as it were, considering that already the ITU is working on LTE Advanced and 802.16m WiMAX, both of which are being specially crafted to offer 100mbps mobile throughput and 1gbps stationary throughput.

A lot is riding on what happens beyond Baltimore. The success of the Sprint/Clearwire mobile WiMAX rollout is expected to have a huge effect on whether or not large worldwide operators will roll out mobile WiMAX, In-Stat noted, predicting that mobile WiMAX and LTE regardless will represent only a miniscule portion of the total 4.8 billion mobile subscriptions in 2013.

Meanwhile, the 3G network technology known as HSPA remains a strong, growing area of development, with 10mbps downloads to make an appearance next year and some vendors demonstrating 20mbps, 40mbps and 100mbps in the lab now. HSPA, noted In-Stat, may turn into WiMAX's true competitor, and also may delay LTE rollouts. It also might make WiMAX more of an island technology in a sea of GSM.

In other words, the Sprint model, which relies on the deployment of a large WiMAX connectivity footprint, to in turn give consumer electronics companies enough of a target market (economies of scale, you know) to justify building things like WiMAX-enabled cameras, or televisions, may or may not have legs.

And when it comes to the applications themselves, there’s the host of technical backend issues to consider, which are the same for any mobile application business model. Interoperability for Web applications is a key to consumer uptake, but with a fractured connectivity landscape and a range of devices running different OS, how can the industry enable that? How can it manage those applications and content from a DRM and security perspective? How can the user interface be crafted to give a consistent experience regardless of device? How can operators balance the cost of delivering data and a flat-rate ARPU model? How will all the stakeholders ultimately get paid?

The bottom line: the consumer play is a wild and wooly place, rife with opportunity, excitement and uncertainty. All eyes will be on Sprint as we see how things develop.

http://www.xchangemag.com/articles/wimax-gets-down-to-business.html


A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Sun 04-Jan-09 14:49:34
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Happy New Year. Trawling WiMAX this morning, I came across this intriguing snippet extracted from zdnet.co.uk/blog/

Easynet Roundtable - "Achieving Quality Internet Today" 27.11.08
David Meyer attended and reported that: "The only other point of interest from this morning's roundtable regarded a certain early WiMax operator here in the UK. Apparently they need 400 customers in a one-kilometre radius to break even. And there's your fun fact for the day."

Question - Does it stack up?
Divide the sum of the areas covered by NOW Wireless Internet (in Thames Valley & West London) by 3.142 square km
Then multiply the result by 400 and compare the answer with 14,000 (in August 2007).






A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 05-Jan-09 00:20:40
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Ah! but Gordon has just announced tonight, that he will create new jobs by boosting "digital technology"

OFCOM SPECTRUM-FLOG CLOSER AFTER COURT DECISION

Sucks to be, 02 (and T-Mobile)

The Register

By Bill Ray 22.12.08

Ofcom's continuing battle to sell off the 2.6GHz frequency has taken a step forward, with T-Mobile and O2 losing their appeal in relation to the question of jurisdiction and allowing progress of the High Court case to proceed.

This decision comes from the Court of Appeal, and rules that the High Court, and not the Competition Appeals Tribunal, has jurisdiction on the case - which means all parties can set off for the High Court early in the new year. If Ofcom wins that case then the spectrum should go under the hammer around March 2009.

The two operators have been arguing that it is unfair to sell off more spectrum while still deciding on the re-farming of 900MHz - they don't want to bid huge sums of money for higher spectrum only to find out next year that they can deploy 3G, and 4G, in the 900MHz space they already own.

The claim - that without knowing the plans for 900Mhz it's impossible to value the other frequencies - is sort of fair enough. But there is a happy side effect that no one can launch WiMAX or similar while the case persists - a situation that suits T-Mobile and O2 very well. Both companies are committed to LTE (Long Term Evolution) which is still under development, though the standard should be finished any day now.

The arguments aren't as important as they were: it's hard to imagine a new challenger finding backers for a national network to rival the cellular operators. The buying of 2.6GHz is much more likely to offer fixed-wireless broadband in towns and cities, at least until the economic situation improves. ®

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/12/22/2_6_ghz


A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 06-Jan-09 12:33:05
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Mr Li reveals his intentions on home territory?

HONG KONG SHORTLISTS BIDDERS FOR WIMAX SPECTRUM

wimax-vision.com
06/01/2009

OFTA, Hong Kong's telecom regulator, has announced five qualified bidders for BWA licences at 2.3GHz and 2.5GHz, which are both standardised WiMAX frequency bands. These are China Mobile Hong Kong Company Limited; CSL Limited; Genius Brand Limited; Hong Kong Broadband Network Limited; and SmarTone Wireless Limited.

There is strong representation of Hong Kong's cellular operators among the qualified BWA bidders: China Mobile Hong Kong runs the 'Peoples' mobile brand service on the island, while CSL represents CSL Mobility, another Hong Kong mobile operator. Genius Brand, meanwhile, is a joint venture comprising PCCW, a fixed-line operator, and mobile player Hutchison. SmarTone Wireless Limited is a subsidiary of SmarTone, yet another Hong Kong mobile operator.

A total of 195MHz of spectrum is up for grabs - 90MHz in the 2.3GHz band and 105MHz at 2.5GHz. The BWA licences allow for mobile and fixed services, including voice and data.

The auctions are scheduled to start on 12 January.

http://www.wimax-vision.com/newt/l/wimaxvision/article_view.html?artid=20017604446

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 08-Jan-09 17:11:37
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
SUPERFAST WIMAX COMES TO PORTLAND

The Oregonian
Mike Rogoway 03.01.09

YouTube atop Mount Tabor? Can do. Videoconference on the MAX? Why not? But really, why?

Billions of dollars hinge on that question, and Portland residents will help provide the answer.
We're second in the nation to get a taste of an ambitious, unproven, new technology called WiMAX. It beams super-fast Web access from cell phone towers all over the metro area to you, wherever you are.

For a fee -- $20 to $50 a month, depending on speeds and how much you use it -- WiMAX holds the promise that you can go pretty much anywhere and connect to the Internet at rates nearly as fast, or maybe faster, than what many people have at home.
For Web surfers accustomed to choosing between cable or DSL at home, WiMAX promises a cheaper, more versatile option. For mobile access, a WiMAX card in your laptop is considerably faster and a little cheaper than today's speediest cellular connections.

Clearwire, the Seattle-area startup behind the new service, believes an increasingly mobile population already wants more than texts and Twitter. As it expands beyond Portland, Clearwire's outsized ambition aims to leave today's technologies in the dust.

WiMAX by the Numbers

• $1.6 billion has been invested in Clearwire by Intel
• 80% is Clearwire's share price decline since going public in March 2007
• 5 million U.S. residents live in areas with Clearwire WiMAX today
• 140 million U.S. residents live in areas Clearwire plans to serve by 2011

The Players

• Craig McCaw & Clearwire: The Seattle billionaire started Clearwire to remake a wireless industry he helped create. Clearwire hopes WiMAX eventually will displace cell phone data networks operated by AT&T and Verizon. But its start has been complicated by technological delays and complicated business relationships. Its share price is off more than 80 percent since going public in March 2007.

• Intel: The world's largest chip maker has invested $1.6 billion in Clearwire, hoping to open a new path to the Internet and create new markets for its chips. Intel helped midwife WiMAX technology, and much of the testing for the new standard was done in Washington County. Intel has a terrible track record making money on communications hardware, though.

• Comcast and other cable companies: Other than Verizon, few companies offer both mobile Internet access and high-speed Internet connections in the home. Comcast invested $1 billion in Clearwire, and other cable operators put in $650 million more, in hopes of offering customers a mobile option in the future.

What it Costs

• CLEAR
Home Internet access: Download speeds from 768 kilobits per second to 6 megabits per second: $20 to $50 a month, depending on speed, plus $5 a month for WiMAX modem. Later this year, Clearwire plans to offer Internet home phone service for $25 a month, plus $15 for a phone adapter.
Mobile Internet access: Downloads at 4 mbps: $30 to $50 a month, depending on how much data you use, plus $50 for mobile WiMAX modem.

• ALTERNATIVES
Home Internet access: Comcast, Qwest and Verizon offer home Internet access at download speeds from 1 mbps to 100 mbps, for $30 to $145 a month, depending on speed. Mobile Internet access: Cricket Wireless, Sprint, Verizon and AT&T offer wireless Internet cards for laptops. Access typically costs $40 to $60 a month, plus $30 or more for a wireless card. Downloads are typically around 1 mbps.

Note: Companies may assess additional activation fees, taxes or other charges

Investors are skeptical, and Clearwire's stock is in the tank. Nonetheless, the company has raised billions to fund its vision -- $3.2 billion last year alone --from big-name technology companies including Sprint, Comcast and Google.
Intel, Oregon's largest private employer, has tossed in $1.6 billion. The chip maker is gambling that WiMAX will increase the demand for mobile technology and, in turn, for new products built with Intel chips. All while the nation's economy is in a historic swoon.

"This is not for the fainthearted," said Sriram Viswanathan, who signed the checks to Clearwire as vice president of Intel's venture capital arm and manager of the company's WiMAX program.
"We take big bets," Viswanathan said. "We're about changing not just the company, but changing the industry. Big things require big risks."

Clearwire is marketing its service under a new brand name, "Clear." You may have seen its door-hangers and billboards around town. Its stores and mall kiosks will soon be everywhere in the Portland area, along with retail displays in big box stores and aggressive online and direct mail advertising.
The scale of the ad campaign reflects Portland's importance to Clearwire. The company hopes to make this a model for WiMAX's potential and whet the appetite of the rest of the nation.

Portland's a key test case for the company, which picked the city in part because of Intel's substantial local presence and in part because of a tech-savvy population with an affinity for the latest gadgets and gear.
Portland has bad memories of new wireless technologies, owing to the city's failed bid at creating a municipal Wi-Fi network with California startup MetroFi. That project imploded last year, leaving abandoned wireless antennas atop streetlights and plenty of hard feelings.

WiMAX technology is much more robust than Wi-Fi, providing powerful wireless signals that stretch for miles instead of a few dozen feet.
"It's really the quality of the network that will give us a leg up," said Ben Wolff, Clearwire's chief executive and a 1994 graduate of Lewis & Clark Law School.
That quality comes with a price. Powerful wireless broadcasts require expensive, federally licensed radio spectrum. That's why WiMAX subscriptions cost money, while Wi-Fi is generally free.

WiMAX isn't just mobile. Clearwire is also marketing its service as a low-cost replacement for your cable or DSL service at home. Clearwire plans to add an option for Internet-based phone service within the next few months, and mobile Internet phones within a few years.
In the long run, though, wireless won't be able to keep up with the ever-faster speeds that expanding fiber-optic networks provide. So mobility is where WiMAX's future lies, and Clearwire's.

WiMAX chips are already turning up in new laptops, eliminating the need for plug-in cards. In time, Clearwire expects WiMAX will be built into cell phones, too, providing a faster option for wireless Internet access and perhaps displacing the established cell phone companies.

Despite its formidable backers and rich pedigree -- Clearwire's founder is Craig McCaw, the Seattle billionaire who helped create the cell phone industry -- the product's launch has been rocky.
Investors, initially enthusiastic about WiMAX prospects, now question whether Clearwire has the technological and financial muscle to take on existing wireless carriers.
Clearwire's stock price has fallen more than 80 percent since it went public in March 2007. The company's Portland launch comes nearly a year behind schedule, delayed as much by the company's complicated business partnerships as by technical issues.

Questions Arise

Clearwire faces a crucial question, common to new technologies: Can it absorb its massive development costs long enough to attract the customers who will make the investment profitable? Add to the equation that the new service is hitting an increasingly competitive market during a moribund economy, and that WiMAX technology has yet to prove itself technically.

Web surfers already have a lot of mobile options, from free coffee shop Wi-Fi to subscriptions from cell phone carriers AT&T and Verizon.
While the cellular companies charge about twice as much for much slower connections, they have a few big advantages: Large customer bases, plenty of cell phones that can access their networks, and broad coverage that stretches from coast to coast.

By comparison, Clearwire offers WiMAX in only Portland and Baltimore (though Clearwire serves 45 other cities -- including Bend, Eugene, Klamath Falls and Seattle -- with an older wireless Internet technology.)
Clearwire hopes to make WiMAX available to a quarter of the nation's population by the end of 2009, and nearly half of it by 2011. But it will be years before WiMAX matches cellular's reach.
click to see chart full size
And there aren't any widely available WiMAX phones yet, and only a handful of laptops come with WiMAX built in. Everyone else has to buy (about $50) or rent ($5 a month) a WiMAX card that plugs in to the side of the computer.

Technology Worth it

If Clearwire's got a steep climb ahead of it, the company insists its technology makes the trip worth taking. Scott Richardson helped develop WiMAX technology as an Intel vice president in Hillsboro, then left to continue the work with Clearwire.
"I realized that my passion for the technology was greater than my passion for working inside (Intel)," he said.

Now Clearwire's vice president for strategy, Richardson works out of the company's 50-person office on Portland's South Waterfront. Clearwire stands out from the cellular carriers, he said, because it's staked out more hard-to-get, federally licensed radio spectrum. That gives it the capacity to continue increasing speeds, he said.
"As long as the user demands the fastest possible Internet experience on the go, we can be the leader," Richardson said.

People clearly want mobile Web access, said Steve Clement, a research analyst who follows Clearwire for Pacific Crest Securities in Portland.
"The bigger question is how much bandwidth do people need mobily? And if it turns out they need tons and tons, Clearwire is in pretty good shape," Clement said.
However, he added, "There's a real question as to whether there's huge demand for that in a mobile environment." And Clement said Clearwire has additional challenges: It has to build a network that can compete with the broad cellular footprint. It has to offer a markedly superior product, at a competitive price, to lure customers away from the entrenched cell phone carriers.

The receding economy is sure to slow Clearwire's expansion, he said, by limiting the company's access to cash. Even with the billions Clearwire has raised, the company is burning through hundreds of millions of dollars as it sets up its network and says its funding is only sufficient to last through this year.
"They're going to have to be more prudent in how they use their resources," Clement said.

Clearwire has been testing WiMAX in Portland for several months with Intel employees and select customers. The service has been available online since the beginning of December, but Clearwire's real push begins with a formal launch Tuesday.

Already on board is Sam Churchill, a Portland telecom enthusiast who edits a Web site called dailywireless.org. He signed up for the home version of Clearwire's service at the beginning of December.
"I like it fine," he said. "I haven't had any problems with it. It's been working well from Day One."
Though Churchill is a techie, he said the setup would be easy for anyone -- simply load the software and plug the antenna in to the computer.

With a WiMAX antenna perched in a windowsill in his Northwest Portland apartment, Churchill said his downloads consistently measure 3 megabits per second, roughly equal to a DSL connection and almost precisely what Clearwire promised.
Connections could slow up as more users join the network, Churchill said, but his early impressions are quite favorable.
"It'll be very interesting over the next few years to see how this plays against cellular," he said. "I think they've got something here.

http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2009/01/superfast_wimax_comes_to_portl.html

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 09-Jan-09 21:19:22
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
C'mon Gordo!

INTEL WANTS NATIONWIDE WIMAX TO TOP PRESIDENT OBAMA'S TECH INITIATIVES

Silicon Valley Watcher

By Tom Foremski 08.01.09

Intel, the world's largest chipmaker, wants affordable high speed wireless broadband to top US technology initiatives, said Craig Barrett, Intel chairman at a meeting at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.

Intel has made significant investments in WiMAX technology, a wireless high-speed broadband technology that can potentially provide inexpensive Internet access to consumers and businesses over large distances without the need for local wifi antennas.

WiMAX will become integrated into future Intel chipsets in the same way that WiFi technology has become a standard part of its desktop and notebook products. However, there needs to be a substantial WiMAX infrastructure to take advantage of the WiMAX chipsets.

Mr Barrett has provided advice to President Bush on technology initiatives, and he and other industry executives are likely to do the same for President-elect Barack Obama administration, and whoever is appointed to a newly created position of US "Chief Technology Officer (CTO)."

Intel is conducting a survey at CES to gauge support for WiMAX, and other technology initiatives, among US voters. The survey questions include:

How would you rank the following - with 1 being the most important and 3 being the least important - for the Obama Administration’s CTO regarding technology and broadband/Internet?

- Provide incentives to citizens to make fast, affordable, high-quality broadband deployment a reality for all Americans.

- Focus on federal initiatives that expedite the roll-out of wireless broadband technologies across entire cities.

- Advocate open spectrum policies that enable mobile carriers and manufacturers to make market-driven agreements to deploy next-generation wireless broadband technologies like WiMAX.

Intel Chief Technology Officer Justin Rattner will include the survey results in a letter he is planning to send to President Obama's CTO.

WiMAX could help make Internet access more affordable to larger numbers of people and help bridge a digital divide. It would also help spur sales of computers and servers for Intel, as well as for many other tech companies involved in building a national WiMAX infrastructure.

High-speed wireless Internet would also make it possible for many smaller companies to offer new types of services that require fast connections and help the US catch up with countries that already have a well developed infrastructure of high speed broadband.

Foremski's Take:

President elect Barack Obama and his advisors have proposed a stimulus package to boost an ailing economy that would invest in infrastructure projects. These would include new bridges, repairing roads, sewer systems, etc. It would make excellent sense to also invest in building a 21st century digital infrastructure.

In the same way that the US economy was helped by the building of a nationwide road and rail network, similar benefits can be realized from a nationwide high-speed digital network.

The US has fallen far behind other countries in terms of broadband speeds and availability. In Greece and Estonia, Internet access has been designated a basic human right and the government has a responsibility to ensure all its citizens have access to this resource.

While the US is unlikely to amend its constitution, a national grid of affordable digital highways, will be just as important as roads and railroads to the health of an economy. For example, inexpensive high speed connections would make it easier to implement distance learning programs, and telecommuting. This would save on travel and fuel costs and be beneficial to the environment. And there would be certainly be plenty of new types of applications and services developed on top of such a platform resulting in new jobs and new markets. A lot of SIlicon Valley companies have business models that rely on customers having easy and affordable Internet access.

WiMAX is one of the technologies that can make this possible and help break the duopoly control of the telcos and cable operators on consumer Internet access. More competition and faster Internet connections will contribute to a strong digital economy.

(Intel is a sponsor of SVW)

http://www.siliconvalleywatcher.com/mt/archives/2009/01/intel_wants_nat.php


A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 21-Jan-09 11:18:21
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
OBAMA 2.0: TECHNOLOGY IN THE NEXT PRESIDENCY

XCHANGE

Luc Ceuppens Juniper Networks 14.01.09

As Barack Obama takes office, there is a lot of anticipation, but also a lot of anxiety! He has committed to implementing the significant changes he highlighted during his campaign, which are described in his “Blueprint for Change.” While his Blueprint touches on many traditional topics such as health care, energy and education, one specific area stands out as compared to previous presidents: technology. The Obama campaign was the first ever to utilize social networking technology effectively to rally supporters and disseminate information. His Blueprint for Change also includes several initiatives that will directly and indirectly affect the telecom industry.

While campaigning, Obama repeatedly mentioned that broadband connectivity is a key piece of our continued technological leadership. His change.gov transition Web site states that, “As a country, we have ensured that every American has access to telephone service and electricity, regardless of economic status, and Obama will do likewise for broadband Internet access.” In a Web-delivered address in early December 2008, Obama proposed increasing broadband connectivity in rural locations by re-routing taxes and surcharges that currently are going to the USF. This fund contributed to the dramatically high landline connectivity rate in the United States. Mediamark Research INC (MRI) reported that in 2000, U.S. landline connectivity was greater than 95 percent. Re-routing these taxes dramatically could change the face of telecommunications in the United States, which is one of the few countries in the world that can claim that anyone who wants a landline can get one, regardless of where they live. If Obama carries through with his plan, there is potential that the United States will be able to claim the same for broadband connectivity as well.

Further plans by Obama that will affect the telecommunications industry in the United States are his proposals to invest in the IT infrastructure for the health care industry and to modernize public safety systems. His plans include $10 billion of spending to digitize health care records and to adopt standards-based electronic health information systems. This will stimulate business for data storage systems, network equipment, Web site development, and other communications systems — all of which ultimately drive network traffic. Similarly, according to change.gov, his proposals for the public safety industry include plans to “spur the development and deployment of new technologies to promote interoperability, broadband access, and more effective communications among first responders and emergency response systems.”

Of course, candidates’ campaign promises don’t always come to fruition. However, considering how Obama has embraced technology to such a greater degree than any other president, we can be hopeful. As The Washington Post states in its Nov. 10, 2008 issue, “Barack Obama will enter the White House with the opportunity to create the first truly ‘wired’ presidency.” He is the first president ever to appoint a U.S. Chief Technology Officer with the responsibility to oversee the IT infrastructure of government agencies and create policies and services that take advantage of technology. U.S. News & World Reports (Dec. 8, 2008) called Obama’s use of technology “path-breaking” and reported that his campaign amassed an e-mail database of more than 10 million supporters — more than most cable news shows. He has a dedicated channel on YouTube, which he plans to use to conduct online sessions and post interviews. So while some of the promises may fall by the wayside or may not turn out exactly as stated during the campaign, there is a great potential for change that not only will energize the country, but also the world of technology and communications.

Luc Ceuppens is senior director, head of product marketing, High-End Systems Business unit at Juniper Networks

http://www.xchangemag.com/blogs/luc/blogdefault.aspx

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 23-Jan-09 13:15:33
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Mr Li comes up trumps on home ground. He's in with Genius. Hope it encourages UK B/Band to have a go here - if Ofcom ever gets it's finger out.

HONG KONG AWARDS THREE WiMAX LICENSES

cellular-news
23rd January 2009

­The auction of BWA (WiMAX) licenses in Hong Kong has been completed - with three winners. Three bidders have successfully bid for a total of 90 MHz of radio spectrum in the 2.5 GHz band at a total of spectrum utilization fee (SUF) of HK$1.5357 billion (US$198 million).

"With the assignment of the radio spectrum, the successful bidders will be able to deploy the next generation Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) technologies and offer a variety of advanced high-speed multimedia services. This should create a lot of opportunities for both network operators and providers of content and service applications," a spokesperson of the telecoms regulator, OFTA said.

"This is the first time that the Government deploys an Internet-based software platform for auctioning radio spectrum, which is an important scarce public resource. With the participation of five bidders, we went through a total of 56 rounds of bidding over the past nine business days," the spokesperson said.

Genius Brand 30 MHz
(2500-2515 MHz paired with 2620-2635 MHz) HK$518million

CSL 30 MHz
(2540-2555 MHz paired with 2660-2675 MHz) HK$523million

China Mobile ( Hong Kong) 30 MHz
(2555-2570 MHz paired with 2675-2690 MHz) HK$ 494.7million

"The Telecommunications Authority (TA) will issue the BWA licences upon receipt of the SUF and the performance bond from the provisional successful bidders," the spokesperson of OFTA added.

http://www.cellular-news.com/story/35656.php

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 28-Jan-09 11:11:46
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
NEW WIRELESS 60 GHZ STANDARD PROMISES ULTRA-FAST APPLICATIONS

Georgia Institute of Technology

By Rick Robinson 15.01.09

This (image) 60 GHz single-chip CMOS radio-frequency device, developed at the Georgia Electronic Design Center by Joy Laskar and Stephane Pinel, is currently the world’s most integrated chip for 60 GHz wireless applications.

Ultra-high-speed wireless connectivity - capable of transferring 15 gigabits of data per second over short distances - has taken a significant step toward reality. A recent decision by an international standards group could help bring this technology to market soon.

Short-distance 60 Ghz technology could offer many benefits to bandwidth-hungry applications such as high-definition video and high-capacity data storage. The new standard would support extremely fast wireless peer-to-peer connectivity, PC connectivity and High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) cable replacement.

Among the many potential 60 GHz applications are virtually wireless desktop-computer setups and data centers, wireless home DVD systems, in-store kiosks that transfer movies to handheld devices in seconds, and the potential to move gigabytes of photos or video from a camera to a PC almost instantly.

Industry group Ecma International recently announced a worldwide standard for the radio frequency (RF) technology that makes 60 GHz “multi-gigabit” data transfer possible. The specifications for this technology, which involves chips capable of sending RF signals in the 60 GHz range, are expected to be published as an ISO standard in 2009.

“We believe this new standard represents a major step forward,” said Joy Laskar, a member of the Ecma 60 GHz standards committee and director of the Georgia Electronic Design Center (GEDC) at Georgia Tech. “Consumers could see products capable of ultra-fast short-range data transfer within two or three years.”

He added that multi-gigabit technology could also help enable “viral communications.” Viral communications scenarios envision a future of decentralized, ubiquitous, wireless devices that aren’t directly connected to a central communications conduit. Instead, they cooperate with one another to both utilize and expand bandwidth and data availability.

GEDC, a microelectronics design center at the Georgia Institute of Technology, has already produced a CMOS chip capable of transmitting 60 GHz digital RF signals. This chip design could speed up commercialization of high-speed short-range wireless applications because CMOS technology is both low cost and low in power consumption.

“Multi-gigabit technology definitely has major promise for new consumer and IT applications,” said Darko Kirovski, senior researcher at the Microsoft Research division of the Redmond, Washington, software giant. “Ecma’s move on international standardization of 60 GHz frequency range brings us closer to realizing that promise.”

GEDC researchers have already achieved very high data transfer rates that promise unprecedented short-range wireless speeds—15 Gbps at a distance of 1 meter, 10 Gbps at 2 meters and 5 Gbps at 5 meters.

Laskar recently discussed 60 GHz wireless technology at a MIT Enterprise Forum of Atlanta panel discussion on “The Future of Wireless Communications.” The panel, which included Walt Mossberg of The Wall Street Journal and AT&T Mobility CEO Ralph de La Vega, was broadcast Nov. 24, 2008, and can be viewed at (www.mitforum-atlanta.org).

“Multi-gigabit wireless technology is widely perceived as a means to bring important new wireless applications to both consumer and IT markets,” said Ann Revell-Pechar, chair of the MIT Enterprise Forum of Atlanta Chapter board.

Ecma International members finalized the details of the 60 GHz short- range unlicensed communications standard at international meetings in Montreux, Switzerland, in November 2008. The technology was demonstrated using a GEDC-designed CMOS chip.

The GEDC-developed chip is the first 60GHz embedded chip for multimedia multi-gigabit wireless use. The chip unites 60GHz CMOS digital radio capability and multi-gigabit signal processing in an ultra-compact package.

“This new technology represents the highest level of integration for 60GHz wireless single-chip solutions,” Laskar said. “It offers the lowest energy per bit transmitted wirelessly at multi-gigabit data rates reported to date.”

Since its inception in 1961, Ecma International has developed standards for information and communication technology and consumer electronics. Ecma submits its work for approval as ISO, ISO/IEC and ETSI standards. Ecma practices “fast tracking” of specifications through the standardization process in global standards bodies such as the ISO.

http://www.physorg.com/news151258225.html

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home

Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 03-Feb-09 12:01:39
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WiMAX ACES ENERGY AUSTRALIA TRIAL

ZDNet.com.au

Suzanne Tindal 03.02.09

A WiMAX trial Energy Australia has been running with Alcatel-Lucent in the Newcastle region has come up trumps, with early results being much better than expected.
The $3 million, six-site trial was intended to test the technology over an area of 100,000 customers and to see if signal strengths were adequate for communicating machine-to-machine with network components and smart meters.

The organisation planned to have carried out 20,000 signal strength tests by June this year, but the project is ahead of schedule, with 13,000 tests already done since the network was commissioned in October. The success rate has until now been over 99 per cent. "Definitely much better than expected," Energy Australia manager intelligent networks Adrian Clark told ZDNet.com.au. recently.

With a network of sensors and meters connected via WiMAX, Energy Australia would be able to respond to outages more quickly, run its network in a more efficient and automated fashion, give customers real-time information about their electricity use and enable field computing for staff.

"We identified WiMAX as a fourth generation technology — one which we could actually pilot today," Clark said. Other options the company considered were 2G, proprietary wireless technology, 3G or even narrowband over power line.

"A lot of our work has been looking at those, but we see some of them will be obsolete in a few years," Clark said. The units making up the energy network have a 15-year minimum lifespan. Replacing equipment every two to three years wasn't an option, he said, meaning a longer-term technology was needed.

WiMAX offered not only that, but a variety of vendors, which meant that Energy Australia would not find itself married to any one company down the line, he said.

Using 3G would support the requirements, he said, but Energy Australia would need millions of devices with low bandwidth requirements on one base station. The 3G networks built today hadn't been designed with that in mind, Clark said, adding that there weren't any devices ready at this point. WiMAX on the other hand had a number of different vendor roadmaps for devices.

Despite this reasoning, Energy Australia wasn't "100 per cent wedded to WiMAX" Clark said, adding that the company saw WiMAX and LTE as "at least being technically similar". The utility could fall back on 3G networks and wait until smart meters were better defined, he said.

Yet a strategic decision on the preferred communications platform needed to be made and would be tackled after the trial was over, he said.

When the roadmap was clear, Energy Australia would then be able to proactively roll out compliant equipment as it was needed. The utility had already earmarked over $8 billion for the replacement of network components over the next five years, making now a good time to make the strategic decision, Clark said.

Another hurdle the utility needs to overcome before any roll-out can go ahead is to get its hands on some spectrum. The spectrum it had been using for the pilot had only been granted on trial basis. The options, Clark said, were to buy some from a carrier or to approach ACMA to have some released for the purpose. Energy Australia had been in preliminary discussions with carriers, he said. The utility would need around 15MHz of spectrum.

http://tinyurl.com/acppry

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 05-Feb-09 13:29:05
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WIMAX FORUM PICKS VERISIGN'S PUBLIC KEY INFRASTRUCTURE

VeriSign has been chosen to provide security solutions based on Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) for WiMAX networks.

EFY News Network
04.02.09

VeriSign, a provider of Internet infrastructure services for the networked world, has been selected to provide security solutions based on PKI for WiMAX networks, which combine the speed of broadband with the convenience of wireless to deliver the last mile of connectivity on high-speed, metropolitan area networks.

“Ensuring secure communication over WiMAX-based networks is critical for the successful growth of the WiMAX ecosystem,” said Matt Wangler, director, operations, the WiMAX Forum, a not-for-profit organisation that promotes the adoption of WiMAX-compatible products and services. “Seamless security that is transparent to the end user is also crucial for widespread adoption. We selected VeriSign because of its long track record in providing PKI solutions that feature the scalability and reliability required for WiMAX technology to flourish. With VeriSign, WiMAX is in good hands.”

As a Certification Authority, VeriSign is set to perform critical certificate lifecycle functions for WiMAX service providers and device manufacturers including secure key generation and storage as well as certificate issuance, validation, revocation and renewal. The end result will be mutual strong authentication between WiMAX networks and devices.

Available to both WiMAX service providers and device manufacturers, the VeriSign WiMAX PKI Service is capable of supporting hundreds of millions of PKI-based WiMAX digital certificates on a global scale. The service is derived from VeriSign’s PKI infrastructure that has been delivering hosted and managed security to thousands of commercial and government customers since its inception in 1995. Its architecture is a combination of highly integrated hardware, software and processes that are protected in secure data facilities.

“As WiMAX capabilities become more recognisable and available around the world, the need for a structured but scalable security framework is vital,” said Adam Geller, vice president, enterprise and government authentication, VeriSign. “We are delighted to once again be chosen to deliver the trusted third-party infrastructure and services required to support a complex ecosystem like WiMAX. WiMAX service providers and device manufacturers can be assured that we have the experience and perspective to provide vendor-agnostic services to all participants in the WiMAX community.”

http://www.efytimes.com/efytimes/32077/n...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 06-Feb-09 11:52:57
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
SPRINT’S DUMB PIPE DREAM

gigaom

Stacey Higginbotham 05.02.09

When Sprint signed away its WiMAX spectrum to Clearwire in exchange for 51 percent of the company, and the promise of a nationwide 4G network, it also signed away control of its future. It no longer controls its next generation network — instead it has handed over its spectrum to potential cable and wireless competitors in exchange for a 51 percent stake in the spoils. Sprint argues that this is the model for telecom’s future where the network is merely a pipe and the service provider must become the purveyor of customized service packages and applications for a wider variety of users than ever before.

According to Todd Rowley, VP of Sprint’s 4G business unit, the immediate vision is to build out services now based on the combined Sprint 3G and Clear WiMAX network. It already has a data card product out, and plans for a dual-mode CDMA and WiMAX handset to be released in early 2010.

In addition to the typical cellular data model, Sprint also sees consumer electronics makers embedding WiMax chips into special purpose devices such as the Kindle and general use gadgets such as netbooks and laptops. One plus is that a carrier doesn’t have to subsidize such gadgets. Rowley anticipates sub $10-WiMAX chips coming the next few years, making it less costly for manufacturers to embed 4G connectivity in devices.

“We see home broadband replacement opportunities, video surveillance systems and other products, that as we move forward, we will develop devices and services that target a particular space,” Rowley says.

The catch is multiple parties are able to resell the Clear WiMAX service once (and if) it gets built out, making network access almost a commodity. Clearwire as well as cable partners Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks can compete against Sprint to provide access. This doesn’t even begin to address the competition of other wireless players such as Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile, which are also trying to boost data revenue by providing cellular access for devices other than phones and computers.

So why would a consumer choose to activate on Sprint? For now the 3G coverage is a plus, although Clearwire can also buy access to Sprint’s 3G network. Beyond that it’s not yet clear what Sprint will be able to offer. Cable providers can integrate their WiMAX enabled devices to a consumer’s current broadband and video services, providing the ability to program a DVR on the go, or extend digital home phone service on a computer.

Rowley says Sprint will likely offer more mobile services designed for a mobile experience such as phones, ultraportable computing devices and things like e-Readers or music players. He admits that novel home services such as security or medical monitoring is where Sprint and its cable frenemies will most likely compete.

Without its own 4G network, Sprint has bet its future on getting 51 percent of WiMAX’s success in the U.S. (not a certain thing), and its ability to develop special packages and offerings for the ultimate in dumb pipes. It’s a risky bet.

http://gigaom.com/2009/02/05/sprints-dum...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 23-Feb-09 11:02:14
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Just to distract you from worrying about the pending onset of Deflation.

FEMTOCELL MAKERS CACKLE WITH DELIGHT AS "NO COVERAGE" LAWSUIT GOES AGAINST ORANGE

newswireless.net
by Guy J. Kewney | posted on 19 February 2009

The importance of getting a good signal indoors hardly needs emphasising, after last week in Barcelona. Femtocell technology was the talk of the show. But now after Tom Prescott took his phone network to court and won £500 for "lack of signal" in his home, there will be a sense of greater urgency in the industry.

But will the operators realise that it isn't enough to provide just one network signal per household? Can they ever think past "churn reduction"? Can someone explain that there are worse problems than occasionally watching a customer go to another operator?

From Orange's point of view, the publicity could hardly be worse. Mark Prigg wrote the triumphant report (in the Evening Standard's "This is London"):

Tom Prescott, 32, took Orange to court after they refused to cancel his 18- month contract, even though he could not get a signal either at his Richmond home or in his office. "I felt bullied by the company, and dealing with Orange was awful. I hope people who have the same problem now realise they can do something about it."

The attitude of other mobile operators wasn't likely to be very different - before the lawsuit, anyway. If you complain that a call got dropped, and expect to be taken seriously, then you're mad. Most companies would have taken Orange's attitude: "Coverage is outside our control."

The Court disagreed. It said that if you sell an 18 month contract to a victim who neither lives nor works in an area where you can provide coverage, then it really is your problem, not theirs.

The trouble is, 3G phone technology simply doesn't work well enough for them to be able to fix the problem. Very simply, if the phone mast is blocked by brick or concrete walls, then very little of a 3G wireless signal will get through.

That was Prescott's problem: he couldn't make calls, and he couldn't receive calls. So naturally, he asked for his money back. Orange took the view that if the phone worked, and the network was in place, and if he could actually use the phone out in the street, then they'd done all anybody could expect. So they refused - an error of judgement commercially, but a complete disaster in PR terms.

And all operators are staring at the same disaster, if they don't change their business habits.

Not just one or two phone users have the problem; in some areas, claims of providing coverage are close to fraudulent. They can get away with it if the old 2G GSM network provides backup coverage, of course. But after this, even that may be called into question.

We know how to solve the problem. Simply, 3G operators have to put a private mast into your home. These are very small mobile phone cells. Smaller than microcells, smaller even than picocells, they are called femtocells. They are limited to short range: inside the building, and perhaps the gardens.

Femtocells, built into the typical broadband ADSL router, are likely to be pretty standard when mobile phone technology moves into the next generation, Long Term Evolution, LTE. They will provide Internet connections from your home LAN to your mobile supplier, carrying voice traffic encoded as web data - voice over IP. And in multiple trials around most Western countries, they are showing good promise.

Right now, the chips that handle femtocell signals are not cheap. Before the end user will be satisfied with them, they'll need to come down in cost to well below $50 - and right now, you can spend four times that. And then there's the cost of installing... so the average home owner isn't likely to jump at the opportunity to flash that sort of cash just for the privilege of using one particular network; which means the operator has to sponsor the upgrade.

Question: who will provide your femtocell? Orange? Cingular? Clearwire? France Telecom?

Wrong Answer: "If I provide the customer's femtocell, they'll have to use my service! They'll never be able to switch! Muhahahaha!"

Better answer: "...it's going to cost us, but we have to make sure that this mini-mast works with any phone. Otherwise, nobody is going to see any point in using it."

Best Answer: "We have to change roaming regulations! The whole business model needs radical reform, so that we do NOT create logjams for our customers."

Here's the problem, rather neatly summarised by consultant Dean "Disruptive" Bubley: "These operators are living in a dream world of one operator per household. It isn't going to be true even of single people living alone."

Most households have phones from several operators.

* The teenagers have friends on the same network, so that they can have free SMS texting chats together. Tell them "use
another network" and have your face eaten off. It's not the money (they'll say) - "That network isn't cool."
* The parents often have phones provided by employers (no choice there). And
* there are "private" lines which they use because they always have. "Everybody knows that number," they say.

Yes, you can move a number from one network to another. No, it isn't a picnic. And anyway "why should I?" is the common response.

So along comes the alpha male of the family: "I use Hutchison 3G for my phone, so we're having a '3' femtocell. I'll be able to make and receive 3G calls, and the rest of you will have to go out in the rain - isn't life rough?"

Yeah, sure - that'll work.

http://www.newswireless.net/index.cfm/ar...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 24-Feb-09 11:34:32
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
The Art of War

CLEARWIRE READYING WIMAX GAME PLAN AS RIVAL LTE GAINS STEAM

Verizon is moving aggressively to roll out its competing network

COMPUTERWORLD
18.02.09

When Verizon Wireless announced this week that it would roll out Long-Term Evolution (LTE) mobile broadband in two cities by year's end, rival Clearwire responded, as usual, by saying it has a better network with WiMax today than Verizon will have with LTE next year.

In terms of what average consumers can actually buy, that may be true: Though networks will be in place in two cities this year, Verizon's LTE won't launch commercially until 2010, according to Verizon Executive Vice President and CEO Dick Lynch. But for Clearwire and partner Sprint Nextel, which began with a head start against LTE measured in years, the clock is ticking. Once projected to reach 100 million subscribers by the end of 2008, the new Clearwire joint venture is commercially available in just two metropolitan areas. The company wouldn't say anything else about its rollout plans on Wednesday.

But the WiMax trailblazer is gearing up to give more details about its strategy on March 5, when it announces its financial results for the fourth quarter of 2008. Those details may include dates for commercial availability of the high-speed mobile data service in Chicago, Washington, Boston and Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, possibly very soon. Sprint Nextel's WiMax division was already building networks in those cities before the joint venture with the original Clearwire was completed in December. Clearwire is also working on converting its more than 40 pre-WiMax networks to true WiMax over time.

Clearwire may want to hurry with its deployment, because Verizon is moving aggressively to roll out LTE. Most observers don't expect widespread LTE availability until 2011, but Verizon said Wednesday it plans to have networks in 25 to 30 markets in 2010. LTE isn't expected from the other major U.S. carrier, AT&T, until 2010 or later.

WiMax and LTE use similar technology and are designed to deliver multiple megabits per second, on average, to each subscriber. Clearwire has said its service provides between 2Mbit/sec. and 4Mbit/sec. to subscribers on its existing network in Baltimore. Verizon said Wednesday its LTE tests show speeds as high as 80Mbit/sec., but it wasn't ready to discuss the average speed, and the 80Mbit/sec. might be divided among multiple subscribers in an area.

LTE's biggest advantage is its backing by the Third-Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), the force behind 3G technology among GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) service providers. GSM is the dominant cellular system in the world, and even Verizon, which currently uses CDMA (Code-Division Multiple Access) instead, is turning to LTE.

But Clearwire claimed some momentum for WiMax, too. Its statement on Wednesday pointed out that the WiMax Forum industry group says WiMax service providers around the world reach 430 million people today. By the end of next year, the group expects 800 million people to be in range of a WiMax service. WiMax is based on IEEE 802.16, a family of open standards.

The Clearwire joint venture came to life last November when the combination of Sprint Nextel and the national pre-WiMax service provider Clearwire was finally completed. The company, which eventually will sell service on both Sprint-built and Clearwire-built networks under the Clear brand, is also backed by partners including Intel, Google and some of the largest U.S. cable operators. Together, those companies injected $3.2 billion into the venture.

But amid Sprint's business woes, the declining economy and tight credit markets, Clearwire is in a tough environment for building out a national network with a new technology. Intel and other major partners recently took charges against their financial results for a decline in the value of their Clearwire investments. Clearwire said Wednesday it has enough capital to cover its rollout well into the future

http://tinyurl.com/ctmyxs

Story copyright 2009 International Data Group. All rights reserved.

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 24-Feb-09 11:55:33
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
FEMTO's BIG OPEN SECRET

Unstrung

Michelle Donegan, European Editor, 18.02.09

The biggest open secret in femtoland is that Cisco Systems Inc. has integrated the ip.access Ltd. Oyster 3G femto into its Scientific-Atlanta set-top boxes for AT&T Inc. None of those companies has ever officially said exactly what they're doing together.

But if you're at the Mobile World Congress, you can go and see Cisco's femtocell device on the ip.access stand. The femto vendor has some good demos, too.

Yesterday, AT&T's senior vice president of architecture and planning, Kris Rinne, told an audience here that her firm would start trials in three U.S. cities in the spring, but she did not name the supplier.
(See: http://www.unstrung.com/document.asp?doc....)

Industry sources say there was a Cisco femtocell press release prepared for this week, but it has not been released. Cisco has a policy of not announcing new solutions without an operator customer. So, what's the holdup at AT&T?

Cisco's Kittur Nagesh, director of service provider marketing, told Unstrung that "femtocells are extremely critical," and that they fit in with the company's Connected Home strategy. "You've got femto access points, the Scientific-Atlanta set-top boxes, and Lynksys… Our goal is to combine all of those into one integrated experience."

http://www.unstrung.com/blog.asp?blog_se...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User kijoma
(learned) Thu 12-Mar-09 16:04:42
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
hi,

not often i get time to pop onto the forums, too damn busy smile

i still have to chuckle at lines like >

"WiMAX technology is much more robust than Wi-Fi, providing powerful wireless signals that stretch for miles instead of a few dozen feet. "

the above from a previous post.

WiMax is one inflating bubble that will eventually burst with all the hype. It isn't fast enough so by the time the mass hype/investment is over and there is mainstream offerings, nobody will want a highly contended few Mbps...

To say WiMax has miles of range and 802.11x systems haven't is a complete lie. WiMax will have the same range roughly with the same aerial setup/conditions. So if its to a laptop then 100mtrs or so is a sensible limit. Same for both technologies. The laptop has to transmit back after all so i don't expect to see WiMax chipsets in laptops with Watts of output power anytime soon laugh

Hype is Hype, the rest of us continue to deliver smile

Bill Lewis - MD
Kijoma Broadband - (Division of Kijoma Solutions Ltd)
High Speed Wireless broadband ISP
The UK's top rated Wireless ISP 2005 - 2008 - ISP Review
Top 5 finalist in best UK wireless ISP - ISPA's 2008
Members of the Internet Service Providers association (www.ISPA.org.uk)
http://www.kijoma.net
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Fri 13-Mar-09 21:14:59
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: kijoma] [link to this post]
 
You're forgetting that true WiMAX operating at licensed frequencies is far more robust and is also more powerful given the fact the deployments have a much higher EIRP afforded by the license. That, coupled with the native QOS support via rtps\ugs service-classes and the relative lack of interference makes it far more robust than WiFi. Granted, that's in FWA scenarios - and when the mobile variant takes off its, as you rightly point out, it's only as good as the CPE\Laptop.

As somone who works with standard WiFi deployments, 5.8 wimax-type kit and 3.6ghz licensed WiMAX - I'm speaking from experience. WiFi is a great technology and in most cases it's excellent, but whilst I've worked on deployments with 30 odd customers, up to 8 miles away hanging off a single PMTP WiMAX antenna who get business class service, I wouldn't like to try and do that with WiFi, especially with the restrictions in the UK.

You're right though, there is a lot of hype surrounding WiMAX, typically you'd expect from a single sector (with say 60 degree antenna) it to handle around 20-25Mbps over the air, no one where near the figures you see quoted. The benefit of the different service-classes is you can load it up and still over a high QOS for things like VoIP\Video.
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 31-Mar-09 11:33:16
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
TOP 22 OPERATORS ACCOUNT FOR 50% OF TOTAL WiMAX SUBSCRIBERS

Posted 30.03.09

­The top 22 WiMAX operators worldwide will contribute nearly 2.5 million subscribers by the end of 2009 - up from 1.24 million today - and close to 4 million by the end of 2010 according to the latest research report from Maravedis.

Operators selected for the report enjoy two key conditions: they have deep enough pockets to deploy major networks and have access to sufficient spectrum to be profitable in the long term. In fact 46% of operators interviewed have 50MHz or more of spectrum, while 45% have more than US$100 million in cash. These operators include obvious names such as Clearwire, and also operators who currently enjoy a relatively small subscriber base, but for whom Maravedis believes there is great potential, such as Scartel (Russia). Other such “strategic” operators include: UQ Communications (Japan), Far EasTone (Taiwan), BSNL (India) and Telmex International.

Of fundamental importance to many operators is how to bring forward new deployments that can support market demands for higher bandwidth and a richer mix of applications and content. “A major focus of this report is to provide insights of the plans and experiences of the top 22 operators. At this volatile juncture, it is important to keep close tabs on evolution of network deployments and services”, said Adlane Fellah, CEO of Maravedis.

“Interestingly, 42% of these operators are considering or planning to deploy LTE,” said Cintia Garza, Senior Analyst and co-author of the report. “Networks have been dominated so far by standalone CPEs as well PC peripherals such as USB dongles and PC cards. Embedded multimode devices are only emerging in the last few months thanks to operators such as Scartel,” added Garza.

Although the top 22 WiMAX operators enjoy the support of strong investor groups and deep pockets to offset limited credit facilities, they are still impacted by the financial crisis. Given the current global economic uncertainty, wireless capital expenditures by most of the top WiMAX operators are predicted to slow down in 2009. “Furthermore, some operators are feeling pressure from not having the right spectrum or sufficient spectrum to achieve their deployment plans,” added Basharat Ashai, co-author of the report.

“It is important to keep in mind that WiMAX is just now entering a phase of commercial availability that makes volume applications, including machine to machine, utility monitoring, metro-wide mobile broadband and embedded consumer applications feasible. In addition, the lean WiMAX ecosystem has already reached price points for ICs, modules and devices to compete in volume markets,” noted Robert Syputa, Partner & Senior Analyst.

Selected Highlights:

* 47% of current networks account for less than 10,000 subscribers
* 75% of operators have more than 10 million POP covered
* Operators are generating an average ARPU of US$35 for residential services and US$93 for business services
* 33% of operators use only microwave radios for their backhaul
* 52% plan to deploy femtocells in the next 24 months

http://www.cellular-news.com/story/36737.php

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 02-Apr-09 11:22:03
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
MOBILE SHOWDOWN AT CTIA: WiMAX VS LTE, APPS AND MORE

Posted on ZDNet by Sam Diaz 01.04.09

As if the line up of too many operating systems wasn’t enough for the wireless phone industry, here comes 4G and a battle of its own: WiMax vs. LTE.

Actually, I’ve heard the battle better described as sibling rivalry, largely because the technologies aren’t that far apart from each other and there’s already been talk that, someday, there could be a convergence where one device would be able to communicate with either network.

In one corner there’s WiMax, the technology being pushed by Clearwire. It’s advantage: after years of talking about WiMax, we’re finally starting to see a rollout. Just this week, Clearwire announced Clear Spot, an accessory that allows any WiFi device (such as an iPhone) to connect on the WiMax network - where it’s available.

In the other corner, there’s LTE, which seems to be promising to deliver faster speeds than WiMax, but won’t start seeing a rollout until sometime next year (though we may see a bit of a rollout late this year.)

In this case, it doesn’t seem that a headstart is enough to declare WiMax an early winner. For now, most of the big carriers around the globe are behind LTE, including Verizon Wireless, whose executives talked about the technology at the CTIA show in Las Vegas. In a keynote speech this morning, Ivan Seidenberg, chairman and CEO of Verizon Communications Inc., said:

LTE is quickly emerging as the global standard. We’re moving fast to get to 4G. Working with Vodafone, we’ve completed the market trials and standards work. We will begin deployment later this year with a few commercially-ready markets and will roll it out to 25 or 30 markets in 2010, with the expectation of faster rollout thereafter.

But it will take more than just putting the technology in place for either to be declared a winner. It will take a combination of things, including devices and applications to maximize the power of the network. Said Seindenberg: “No single company will be able to envision, let alone provide, every aspect of this whole 4G ecosystem on its own. That’s why we’re working with partners, entrepreneurs and inventors from across the industry to create the next-generation products and services.”

In a Q&A session at CTIA, Seidenberg and Verizon Wireless CEO Lowell McAdam also talked whether all of the competing operating systems in place today - RIM, Palm, Android, Windows Mobile, Symbian and, of course, Apple - will be around in years to come.

McAdam noted that he “doesn’t need to bet on an operating system… I need to bet on layers that will bridge those operating systems,” referring to its participation in the Joint Innovative Lab created by Vodafone, China Mobile and SOFTBANK to develop mobile widgets that would run on any Verizon Wireless phone - regardless of the operating system.

This sounds about right for Verizon Wireless, which has a history of developing its own mobile software - such as VCast - and maintaining control over it. Whether that wil fly in an environment where independent developers are creating original applications in the iPhone and Blackberry worlds is unknown.

Does this spell bad news - at least for the time being - for the iPhone to run on the Verizon network? Apple, after all, is seeing a lot of traction in apps and Blackberry just launched its own app store, as well. CNET’s Tom Krazit is right: it’s hard to imagine Apple agreeing to let Verizon run its own applications on the iPhone.

The good news in all of this, of course, is that mobile broadband - whether WiMax or LTE - will be getting a boost in the coming months. For too long, the U.S. has trailed other countries when it comes to mobile technology. The fact that the parties involved are all trying to one-up each other gives hope that someday we’ll be able to catch up.

http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=15637

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 02-Apr-09 11:50:43
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
NOKIA DISMISSES WiMAX PROSPECTS

Financial Times FT.com


Chris Nuttall 01.04.09

Nokia has dismissed the prospects of the WiMax wireless mobile standard, claiming it is doomed to meet the same fate as Betamax, the video format that lost out to VHS in a war over technology standards in the 1970s and 1980s.

The world’s biggest maker of mobile phones is one of the founding members of the WiMax Forum, the industry body set up to promote the standard. The Finnish company is betting the 4G wireless standard LTE – Long Term Evolution – will dominate the mobile world by 2015 and that WiMax will be the big loser.

WiMax has suffered a delayed roll-out in the US, but its main backer, the chipmaker Intel, has claimed the technology is taking hold in other parts of the world.

“I don’t see that WiMax is taking hold anywhere in a big way,” said Anssi Vanjoki, Nokia’s head of sales and manufacturing, at a Nokia launch event in San Francisco.

“I don’t think the future is very promising [for WiMax]. This is a classic example of industry standards clashing, and somebody comes out as the winner and somebody has to lose.

“Betamax was there for a long time, but VHS dominated the market. I see exactly the same thing happening here,” Mr Vanjoki added.

His remarks were the most dismissive by Nokia of WiMax to date. Nokia has previously been perceived as taking care not to be too critical of WiMax.

Nokia has vacillated in its support of the technology in the past. It left the WiMax Forum industry body in 2004, only to rejoin it a short while afterwards. It launched a WiMax device – the N810 – a year ago but then discontinued it in January.

Other players in the industry have seen WiMax as able to coexist with 3G and alongside LTE, which has been adopted by some of the world’s largest mobile operators.

Nokia, however, now appears to be firmly in the LTE camp.

“It’s my prediction that by 2015, we will have an LTE network that will cover most of the important places in the world and that will give us the coverage and capacity we need,” said Mr Vanjoki.

He said Verizon and AT&T were “going full blast” in rolling out LTE networks in the US.

Both LTE and WiMax promise data speeds of more than 100 megabits per second, but delays to WiMax’s deployment and an acceleration of LTE’s roll-out have given the latter the advantage.

Intel said in February it expected 100 laptop models to feature embedded WiMax chips this year.

But while it could refer to WiMax networks being established in Asia and emerging markets, its only (major) presence in the US is (Clearwire).

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2009

http://tinyurl.com/d6fst6

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 23-Apr-09 00:13:54
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Mannerisms Blog on Electronics Weekly

WiMAX: A DOG THAT'S HAD IT'S DAY


Ruminations on the semiconductor industry from David Manners 22.04.09

Has WiMAX had its day? Is WiMAX a case of the Blight of Intel striking again? At the Avren Next Generation Networks conference in Bath this week, it certainly looked that way.

"WiMAX might have had its day", said Terry Mason from Analysys Mason, "it has not been able to leverage its opportunity because of lack of devices and lack of spectrum. If 2.8GHz had been available we might be seeing a different landscape."

As it is Mason sees the disadvantages of WiMAX overcoming its advantages. A major disadvantage is the "huge installed base of UMTS with LTE being a natural evolution" from that.

Other reasons given by Mason for the likely relative insignificance of WiMAX are the fact that, although positioned as a competitor to UMTS, it does not have voice capability, and because "unlicensed bands are inherently noisy".

"LTE offers an almost identical capability", said mason, "HSPA+ is also a threat in providing mobile broadband and the convergence of LTE and 802.16 may overwhelm WiMAX".

Mason reckons that 90% of the 100 million WiMAX customers in 2015 will be in developing regions where ADSL coverage at broadband speeds is poor.

In January this year Intel, a big proponent of WiMAX, wrote $950 million off its $1.6 billion investment in US WiMAX operator Clearwire, reducing the book value of that investment from $1.6 billion to $650 million.

Intel's efforts to get into wireless, including a $10 billion splurge buying start-ups in the 1990s, a failed attempt to make ARM chips dubbed X-Scale, and now what seems like a bad bet on WiMAX suggest that its efforts in the sector are blighted.

Not surprising really. What if Ericsson suddenly said: 'We think we can create a jolly good business in x86 processors?'
'Why?' You ask.

'Because we're so damn clever we can succeed at anything', comes back the answer.

Quite.

http://tinyurl.com/cqojg2

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 27-Apr-09 13:54:28
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WiMAX CAN WIN — IF IT’S NOT PLAYING AGAINST CELLULAR

GIGaom


Daryl Schoolar | 25.04.09

Nokia recently called WiMAX “wireless Betamax,” and its just one example of the lashing WiMAX has received from the technology community and the press. Most mobile operators are going with LTE. Even the much-heralded HTC WiMAX phone for the Russian WiMAX network Yota requires an awkward service arrangement that requires a customer to subscribe to two different service providers; Yota for WiMAX, and a mobile operator for areas without WiMAX.

But even if WiMAX can’t compete with cellular, I believe there is a market for WiMAX. WiMAX’s problem comes from that fact when people talk about it, they do so within the context of the cellular technologies like LTE — but WiMAX is suited to a different use case altogether. Unlike cellular technologies that offer true mobility, WiMAX will offer what I call “nomadicity” — mobility a person can use while in a city but not when traveling between two metro areas.

I conducted surveys at In-Stat in 2007 and 2008 to measure consumer interest in different wireless business models. The business models were based on laptop data usage, and described service offerings from mobile operators, hotspot providers, and Sprint/Clearwire’s WiMAX service plans. In both studies, consumers responded more favorably to the business model I described for WiMAX than those for cellular or Wi-Fi. The basic components of the WiMAX service description were: unlimited use in one’s home, across one’s home city and one-third of other cities; 2-4 Mbps down and 1 Mbps up; and a monthly price of $40-$50.

Two key findings from my research support Clearwire’s current WiMAX service strategy:

* Coverage everywhere may be ideal, but consumers really want coverage just where they are. For most consumers, this location is their home metro area. The business model coverage description of WiMAX was limited to coverage in consumers’ home metro area, and a third of all U.S. cities. This is what I call “nomadicity” vs. “full mobility,” as is found with cellular.
* More than 80 percent of consumers said they had some level of interest in a plan that would provide broadband service both at home and on-the-go. Another 40 percent said they would switch from their current fixed broadband provider for one that could give them home and on-the-go service. Currently, Clearwire provides this in its Portland market.

Devices are also an important factor for WiMAX to be successful. An integral part of the WiMAX strategy has been to keep the intellectual property licensing costs low for devices. This keeps the overall cost of WiMAX-enabled devices low, which encourages vendors to add WiMAX capability to their devices. When prices are low, that reduces the risk factor for consumers and encourages them to try it. In Baltimore, users can get a WiMAX USB modem for $59.99 without signing a service contract. A similar 4G modem on Verizon Wireless, using LTE, would cost $239.99 without a service contract. With this strategy the WiMAX device roadmap will look like the Wi-Fi roadmap: WiMAX-enabled laptops and data devices will come first, followed by consumer electronics. Where Wi-Fi is today, WiMAX should be in the future.

Because of these reasons, I believe there is a business case for WiMAX, as represented by Clearwire and other vendors such as Amsterdam-based Worldmax. However, I also recognize the success of Clearwire and WiMAX in the U.S. is far from certain. Clearwire faces several critical challenges, including funding, timing of its network rollout, device availability, economy and competitors. Whether or not Clearwire survives, I believe its emphasis on nomadicity, with a service that mixes both fixed and mobile broadband, will be successfully used by other WiMAX service providers.

Daryl Schoolar is a senior analyst with the market research firm In-Stat.

http://tinyurl.com/d9aemf

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 29-Apr-09 09:58:02
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
COMSTAR TO FULLY LAUNCH WiMAX SERVICES

Business Wire
Moscow 29.04.09

COMSTAR (United TeleSystems - UTS), the largest integrated telecommunications provider in Moscow and 69 Russian cities, today announced that the test phase of its mobile WiMAX network project has been completed, and the network will be fully launched from May 1, 2009.

The discounted tariff plan for internet access with the data transmission volume of 2 Gigabits will be offered for WiMAX test participants for a subscription fee of RUR 200.00 (US$ 6.01) per month. The charge for the data transmission volume which exceeds a prepaid level will be RUR 1.00 (US$ 0.03) per additional Megabite. New subscribers will be offered WiMAX services and equipment from the middle of May 2009.

Sergey Pridantsev, President and Chief Executive Officer of Comstar UTS, commented: “We are ready to fully launch mobile WiMAX services for our subscribers in Moscow in May this year. The new services will be offered within the frame of the unified telecommunications space created by Comstar. We are very grateful to all our subscribers who have participated in the test phase of the project which was launched on January 15, 2009. Their feedback and recommendations assist us in creating the network which will enable us to provide highly efficient services.”

Comstar UTS is the leading fixed-line telecommunications company in Moscow. Comstar provides voice, data, television and other value-added services to residential and corporate subscribers and operators, using its extensive backbone network and exclusive last mile access to 97% of Moscow households.
The Company also offers communications services in five Russian regions, Armenia and Ukraine. Comstar had 3.6 million residential subscribers and 784 thousand residential broadband internet subscribers in Moscow, as well as 73 thousand residential regional and international broadband internet subscribers at the end of December 2008.
Comstar generated $1,647.7 million of revenues and a 41.4% adjusted OIBDA margin for the twelve months ended December 31, 2008. Comstar’s Global Depositary Receipts are listed on the London Stock Exchange (CMST).

http://tinyurl.com/cyuwgw

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 29-Apr-09 18:22:16
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WHY WiMAX?

xchange magazine

Ron Resnick 27.04.09

Many people are questioning the viability of WiMAX as a 4G solution for the world’s broadband needs. I firmly reject the conclusion not because of the position I hold or the subjectivity I naturally have from being a part of the wireless broadband industry. But fundamentally, you have to look at the undeniable and compelling data points such as the more than 470 deployments in 139 countries now that prove WiMAX is delivering broadband to a wider set of consumers.

Of the 6 billion people on earth, more than 3 billion comprise mobile phone users. One billion consumers are connected to the Internet, but only 400 million have access through broadband. To date, WiMAX already has brought millions of users access to broadband at a cost performance ratio that is far better than any other technology. Most importantly, unlike other voice-centric cellular technologies, WiMAX was designed to deliver broadband wireless access in an open Internet architecture. Furthermore, WiMAX Forum’s certification program ensures WiMAX operators adopt a retail business model to distribute devices and services, which will drive down operators’ sales, channel cost and eventually benefit the end users.

More than 500 companies – at every possible point in the value chain – have committed to creating a solid ecosystem where interoperable equipment and products will bridge the digital divide. Sure, some of these very companies are addressing LTE technology. This is understandable in order to address the needs of mobile operators that are kicking the tires with building out another new network in yet-to-be allocated spectrum. In fact, the air interface technologies for both WiMAX and LTE are very similar. The fundamental differences between WiMAX and LTE are in the business models and service focuses: Where WiMAX is all about openness and enables true broadband Internet services; on the other hand, LTE as the 3G migration path, has to address legacy service continuity such as voice. With the current state of the economy and this standard, we see public plans of the majority of operators wanting to see the fruits of their original investments and 3G-HSPA buildout efforts, which will continue, as well as investments in WiMAX technology.

Sprint and Clearwire have taken on the burden of proving that WiMAX is a feasible technology more than any other. And when there is news of change in plans in WiMAX network rollouts, there seems to be not enough focus on what they’re trying to accomplish – a nationwide rollout during hard economic times. In spite of this, the strategy remains viewed as being sound, and progress impressive. Most encouragingly, WiMAX services in Portland and Baltimore have been received well by the consumer and analyst community in terms of data speed and ease of use.

Both of these operators also have shown the market their unique commitment to the ecosystem on this accelerated path by taking on an unprecedented role in helping drive WiMAX Forum certification testing. In recent weeks, the WiMAX Forum unveiled its Interoperability Testing (IOT) Certification program, which uses experiences learned and test cases from Clearwire’s 2.5GHz commercial WiMAX network to create a live test bed for practical network experience to vendors. Compared to other mobile IOT programs, the WiMAX Forum IOT Certification program is unique because of its ability to accelerate certification of all vendors’ products and provide more certainty to operators that WiMAX products will interoperate in a commercial network environment. As a result, WiMAX Forum members can test 2.5GHz applicant products against proven test cases to ensure interoperability in a truly live commercial environment and rapidly take their WiMAX Forum Certified solutions to the marketplace. And this is only the beginning.

Already, we have received interest from other service providers across all WiMAX spectrum bands to create such network test beds for other spectrum profiles. Operators around the world are lining up to require that WiMAX products become certified prior to introduction to their network to ensure interoperability. This program gives these operators a way to reduce product evaluation cycles, while allowing vendors to quickly move products into the commercial marketplace.

In the years to come, WiMAX will be a leading 4G option that will continue to impact affordable broadband in places not available before. The degree and scale of WiMAX success will be understood fully at this point, but as we have seen by missed prognostications of the past, the results are tied to the compelling demand by subscribers and overall economics. Most importantly, the commitment by Clearwire, Sprint, KT, UQC and the growing number of operators around the globe reveals that the focus is squarely on today’s opportunity of meeting current demands with WiMAX technology.

Ron Resnick is president and chairman of the WiMAX Forum as well as director of industry programs for Intel’s Broadband Wireless Division. In June 2002, he launched and became general manager of Intel’s Broadband Wireless Access startup business focused on wireless Metropolitan Area Network (WiMAX) technology.

http://www.xchangemag.com/articles/501/why-wimax.html[/url

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 07-May-09 12:03:22
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
SAMSUNG LEAKS NEW WiMAX HANDHELD DEVICE

WiMAX.com 30.03.09

Samsung provides details on the development of a new WiMAX MID (mobile internet device). Device is expected to be the first handheld WiMAX device in the U.S. and will operate on Clearwire's WiMAX network.

Based on an RSS feed from its website, Samsung provided details on a new WiMAX handheld device dubbed the SWD-M100 Mondi. The Mondi is expected to be the first handheld WiMAX device in the U.S. and will operate on Clearwire's WiMAX network. Clearwire is planning to launch an additional 8 markets this year including Atlanta, Las Vegas, Chicago, Charlotte, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Honolulu, Philadelphia and Seattle. Overall the company plans to cover 120M Americans in 80 markets by the end of 2010.

Based on pictures and other information, it has a 4.3-inch touch screen display, WiMAX, Wi-Fi 802.11b/g, Bluetooth 2.0 with EDR, a microSD card slot, a rear 3 Megapixel camera and a front facing 0.3 Megapixel camera for video calls, TV-out and an accelerometer. Reports are that the device will run Windows Mobile.

The SWD-M100 Mondi resembles the Nokia N810 Internet Tablet and OQO model 2+. Nokia subsequently decided to discontinue their product. Samsung has not announced a date for launch, although more details could be provided during CTIA in Las Vegas.

http://tinyurl.com/c3jq8h

http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/040109-samsung...[/url

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 12-May-09 10:35:16
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WiMAX CHALLENGES Wi-Fi

This young tech weds the ease of Wi-Fi and the range of cellphone towers.

By Chris Gaylord | Staff Writer for The Christian Science Monitor 11.05.09

When most people hear “wireless Internet,” they think “Wi-Fi.” The technology has allowed millions of computers and mobile devices to browse the Web without the snarl of cords. But there’s another wireless standard out there – one that’s arguably more tempting if it can get its act together. WiMAX delivers the Web similar to Wi-Fi, but covers wide areas like a cellphone tower. While the range of a Wi-Fi router is measured in yards – enough to blanket a house or office – WiMAX can broadcast for miles.

This added range has attracted interest from local governments looking into citywide wireless networks. Several early citywide Wi-Fi plans were abandoned because they underestimated the cost of installing enough hot spots. But with WiMAX, “Instead of needing 20 or 30 Wi-Fi access points per square mile, you need one,” says Craig Settles, an independent wireless analyst. And many cities won’t need to brainstorm creative places to stick a WiMAX antenna, because it can be attached to current cellphone towers.

Sprint rolled out a pilot WiMAX program in Baltimore last year. The network delivers average download speeds of two to four megabits per second, half the rate of cable Internet but several times faster than the 3G mobile service used by many of today’s smart phones, according to Sprint’s tests. The company plans to introduce WiMAX in 10 American cities this year and five more in 2010.

“But here’s the big problem,” says Mr. Settles. “How many iPhones have a WiMAX chip in them? None.” In fact, barely any devices understand a WiMAX signal because it uses different frequencies from Wi-Fi. This incompatibility issue has exacerbated the normal chicken-and-egg problem that plagues new technology: People won’t buy WiMAX devices until there are more WiMAX networks, but why build the network when Wi-Fi is doing so well? Sprint’s plan requires a proprietary antenna that plugs into laptops, similar to the early Wi-Fi cards that have since been built into computers.

If WiMAX takes off, its performance could drop off quickly, says Settles, because fewer towers means that each station needs to juggle more requests. “Some testers were stunned at the difference in reliability as more people join,” he says. “3G has about a 90% uptime. WiMAX is around 70%.”

In the US, WiMAX has an additional hurdle because it relies on frequencies that are regulated by the government, so companies will need to pay extra for broadcast rights. While Settles questions WiMAX’s chances, he says there’s a middle solution. “Locally owned” service provider B2X Online harnesses WiMAX-like towers to deliver broadband Internet to Franklin County, Va. The towers, which transmit over an unlicensed frequency, allow the small company to circumvent the expensive process of laying Internet cables to rural areas.

http://features.csmonitor.com/innovation/2009/05/11/...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 15-May-09 10:41:29
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
UK REPORT RECOMMENDS SPECTRUM CAPS AHEAD OF AUCTIONS

Telecompaper
13.05.09

The UK government has issued an independent report on dividing existing and future mobile network spectrum. After the mobile operators were unable to reach an industry agreement on their existing spectrum holdings, the government asked former Ofcom director Kip Meek to act as an independent broker and develop a plan for the 2G and 3G spectrum. His proposals also incorporate the 2.6GHz spectrum for WiMAX and LTE and the so-called digital dividend in the 800 MHz band, which still must be auctioned. According to the report, the goal is to give network operators certainty on their future investments, encourage further take-up of mobile broadband and use new technologies to achieve the government's goal of near universal broadband access. A quick and efficient division of the spectrum could mean all of the UK enjoying mobile broadband at 4 Mbps within five years, while many urban years would see up to 50 Mbps.

On the spectrum to be auctioned, Meek proposes an auction of the TDD 2.6GHz spectrum for WiMAX services by year-end, and a later auction combining the FDD 2.6GHz and 800 MHz frequencies. Meek would like to see regional and speed obligations on services deployed in the 800 MHz band to enhance broadband access, while the current 3G licence holders would receive incentives for expanding broadband access, such as indefinite licence terms and relaxed rules on rural infrastructure sharing.

To enhance competition, Meek proposes a temporary cap on spectrum holdings, at 2 x 60MHz for overall mobile FDD spectrum. Existing holders of sub-1GHz frequencies would also face a cap, so as to obtain 800MHz frequencies they must give up 900MHz holdings. The caps would expire a year after the combined spectrum auction. The latter cap applies to Vodafone UK and O2 UK, who each already have 2 x 17.2MHz in the 900MHz band. Orange UK and T-Mobile UK each have 2 x 30MHz at 1800 MHz. While they could bid freely for 800MHz or any 900MHz given up by the other two operators, they would only be able to bid for 2 x 10Mhz of the 2.6GHz frequencies in order to remain under the cap. They would have to give up 1800MHz or 2.1GHz frequencies to gain more in the 2.6GHz band. 3 UK and any new entrants would be able to bid freely for any of the spectrum, within the limits of the auctions. Meek's proposals will go to the department for business and regulatory reform, which will formulate a government decision for Ofcom to enact.

http://www.telecompaper.com/news/article.aspx?cid=67...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 15-May-09 10:48:36
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
CLEARWIRE: WE DON’T NEED NO STINKIN’ LTE

GIGaom

Stacey Higginbotham 14.05.09

Clearwire CEO William Morrow, on his first conference call yesterday, did several things right. He toned down the first-mover advantage statements regarding Clearwire’s WiMAX technology and rival fourth-generation wireless technology, LTE, and instead focused on the capacity and openness of the WiMAX network. He pointed out that WiMAX offered a way for customers to get streaming video or other applications that carriers are currently leery of. He also was emphatic that even though LTE and WiMAX are similar, Clearwire isn’t planning on dumping WiMAX in favor of LTE anytime soon:

"If it ever comes to, and I think this was stated in the past, I mean, much into the future, if economies of scale ever get to the point to where it’s advantageous for Clearwire to be also propagating LTE and offering LTE-type technology to its end users, then of course we can do that."

As Dr. Saw has kind of said, I think in the past to many of you, there is an architecture that is IP, that is independent as to whether it is LTE or WiMAX, and we have the ability to add that. Obviously, there would be some cost in it. We don’t think at this point there would be any sort of write-off of the WiMAX because again, it’s going to have a life of its own and be able to sustain itself.

Plenty of people believe WiMAX has a place in this world, and most of them are not on the carrier side. However, as the PC makers and the rest of the technology industry infiltrate the wireless market, Clearwire’s bet on the more open WiMAX technology may pay off. So far, the take-up rate for WiMAX in the few cities where it has launched has looked good. Clearwire added 25,000 new subscriptions this quarter, and users in Portland, Ore., where the service launched in January, are using twice the bandwidth than those in Clearwire’s Pre-WiMAX markets.

http://gigaom.com/2009/05/14/clearwire-we-dont-need-...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 15-May-09 10:52:56
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
4G? IT'S A MYTH BUT DON'T BLAME THE PRESS

iTWire

Stuart Corner 15.05.09

4G is a term often used and more often misused to try and 'sex-up' current or almost current wireless technologies like WiMAX or the long term evolution (LTE) of 3G. One market research firm has had enough - but they're blaming the wrong people for perpetrating the myth of 4G.

Strand Consult this week issued a press release that opened with the statement: "Pardon me but 4G does not exist - it has been invented by the press and by people with little knowledge of the mobile world and the standards being used."

They are right, and they are wrong: 4G does not exist but the people responsible are neither the press nor those with "little knowledge of the mobile world and the standards being used." On the contrary, they are those who understand this world extremely well. In fact they are responsible for the mobile world and the standards that define it. The guilty parties are the operators and the vendors, and I have the evidence to prove it.

Strand's press release continued: "The fact is that there is no 4G standard and that 4G is a phrase that has been invented by journalists and others that are having difficulty explaining the difference between UMTS and LTE...To call LTE 4G is simply misleading and is contributing in moving focus away from the possibilities created by mobile broadband and over to a technological race with nothing else than the number of Gs deciding whether something is good or bad."

Spot on, but then Strand errs again by saying: "Our customers, who are mobile operators around the world, do not do business by marketing and selling 1G, 2G, 3G or 4G, they make a living from selling solutions that are valuable to their customers, solutions that can generate enough revenue that they over time will be able to create a profitable business."

Strand is wrong because marketing 4G is exactly what the industry is doing, even though they end up selling 3G. In January this year Scandinavian telco, TeliaSonera issued a press release claiming it had signed "the world's first 4G commercial contracts" and would be "First in the world with next generation's mobile broadband." Supplier Ericsson jumped on the same bandwagon.

But, as I wrote at the time, http://www.itwire.com/content/view/22685/1095/ "They are both wrong: this is 3G not 4G technology." And I explained that "What TeliaSonera has done is to sign contracts with Ericsson and Huawei for upgrades to its 3G cellular networks to LTE - the Long Term Evolution of 3G cellular. Ericsson has been chosen for the initial rollout out in Stockholm and Huawei for Oslo."

It's good to see someone with the authority of a major consultancy saying the same thing. I just wish they would put the blame where it primarily lies not on the press. We don't invent these terms, we rely on those who do to explain what they mean and how they should be used.

Those like Strand seeking to set the record straight are a rarity. The same day as I received their press release, I got one from another research firm, Strategy Analytics. It was promoting a Strategy Analytics report "Beyond the Handset - Wireless Consumer Electronics: US Market Forecast," that "identifies up to 20 new device segments in which 3G and 4G wireless technologies will be embedded."

It continued: "By the end of 2009, more than half of the 8.4 million consumer electronics devices installed and enabled for 3G and 4G will be consumer notebook PCs. This entire device population of 3G and 4G enabled products will nearly double to 16.6 million in 2010, and continue to expand toward 101 million by 2014."

And I'll offer my twopence worth of market forecasting: by the time we reach 2014 the term 5G will be bandied about with the same reckless abandon as 4G is today.

http://www.itwire.com/content/view/25047/1095/

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 21-May-09 14:35:49
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
HUAWEI TO DEPLOY COMMERCIAL WiMAX IN ITALY FOR RETELIT GROUP

MobileEurope
20.05.09

Huawei has announced that Retelit S.p.A has selected Huawei to deploy its commercial WiMAX 802.16e network covering north and central parts of Italy where it owns a BWA 3.5 Ghz frequency licence.

Under the agreement, Huawei will provide an end-to-end WiMAX 802.16e mobile solution including Base Station, Access Service Network (ASN) Gateway, Hybrid TDM-IP Microwave equipment and Network Management Systems. Huawei has also delivered the first batches of its WiMAX terminals, which are already in use in the areas where the network has been activated. Huawei's certified WiMAX Mobile solution by implementing advanced MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output) radio technologies, enables high-quality large capacity network coverage, making Retelit radio infrastructure one of the most advanced WiMAX mobile networks globally.

"Retelit's development plans are stringent, we are working hard in order to cover all the regions in the north and central parts of Italy," commented Mr. Gilberto Di Pietro, General Manager of Retelit. "As to Huawei, thanks to its experience and state-of-the-art WiMAX mobile technology, we can deliver the network to serve our customers with outstanding wireless broadband access service."

"We are proud to be contributing to the development of Retelit's broadband access field with our innovative solution," said David Wang, Managing Director of Huawei Technologies Italy. "This contract reflects Huawei's cutting-edge technology and continuous commitment to innovation in the WiMAX field. As a leading telecom solutions provider Huawei can leverage the R&D investments thanks to the common hardware and software platform for GSM, UMTS, LTE, CDMA, WiMAX, which enables us to support our customers to realise long-term developments."

http://tinyurl.com/pa67lj

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 22-May-09 13:17:16
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
INTEL to Play WIMAX v 3G GAME as CAPACITY v COVERAGE

TGDAILY

Wolfgang Gruener 22.05.09

From a consumer’s point of view, WiMax has been a huge disappointment so far. Yes we know, it was expensive and complicated to develop, and we had the Xohm financial debacle and reorganization, but it was late to launch to begin with and it is now almost two years behind the initial roll-out schedule. While Clearwire will be driving the network roll-out, companies such as Google and Intel have an interest in getting the technology out as quickly as possible to sell hardware and services into the market. The marketing strategy seems to be unfolding now.

If you aren’t educating yourself, WiMax can be a confusing story. How is it exactly different from what we have already, such as 3G? And you (and we) may be wondering whether WiMax will be a data service, a voice service or both. We had a chance to sit down with Intel’s Ciricia Proulx, who is in charge of the firm’s Global WiMax Strategic Communications, to get a few answers.

At it this point, Intel, which is a major investor in Clearwire, expects to make WiMax accessible to 120 million people in 2010, with global roll-outs planned or already happening not just in the U.S., but also in nations such as Russia, Japan, Taiwan, Malaysia and India.

We usually hear that WiMax is a complementary technology that is not positioned to replace voice services even if it has the potential to - and given the fact that Sprint is the largest shareholder in Clearwire, we shouldn’t expect the company to cannibalize its regular voice service with a competing WiMax voice service anytime soon without asking for nosebleed prices. Proulx told us that there will be devices that will combine voice and data capability via WiMax, but we she indicated that the majority of the devices will support either voice or data. We did not go much further into this topic, but it is somewhat obvious that this circumstance is not due to technology restrictions, but rather due to old telecommunications structures, old thinking and the high cost of the WiMax build-out - cost that must be recouped in one way or the other. And you just don’t do that by destroying margins or, in this case, Sprint’s voice business.

However, if you don’t advertise WiMax as a capable voice/data service, for example in the next-generation MIDs, how do you convince consumers that they should choose WiMax over 3G services such as CDMA or HSDPA? Simple: Intel pitches 3G’s capacity dilemma.

We have heard enough about 3G networks not being able to carry the growing data load: AT&T had its fair share of problems with the iPhone. Users are already told they cannot use certain applications over the cellular network because of bandwidth constraints and probably not only we here at TG Daily know that those 3G networks crumble during big events with many people taking pictures and videos and uploading them to the Internet.

There is no doubt, 3G has a capacity problem and Intel seems to be focusing its WiMax case on exactly this 3G weakness. The company counts on disgruntled 3G users who may consider a switch to WiMax: “People don’t pay for an experience they don’t get,” Proulx said. She admitted that the capacity of WiMax base stations is limited as well, just under 80 Mb/s at this time, but future generations are expected to quickly move into the triple digits - and WiMax may be more scalable due to its data-centric, all-IP network infrastructure.

WiMax has its weaknesses as well and the most critical one is coverage. The build-out is complex, expensive and is very limited at this time in the U.S. In the end, Intel is seeing the battle against 3G as capacity vs. coverage. It is unclear at this time how this competition will work out, but neither technology is in a position to take over the market entirely at this time. One effect we are seeing already is that WiMax may be putting pricing pressure on 3G services as the service becomes more available. Proulx said that carriers already have begun adjusting their pricing strategies and we should expect this trend to continue.

http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/42552/103/

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 29-May-09 12:34:06
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
THE OMINOUS RETURN OF THE SATELLITE PHONE

GIGaom

Stacey Higginbotham 21.05.09

TerreStar expects to launch a satellite that costs some $500 million at the end of June, and with it, hopes to reinvent the failed satellite service model from the 90s. Even though TerreStar’s service will launch at the end of this year with normal-sized phones that also work on cellular networks, the likelihood of success doesn’t seem high. But in addition to offering better cell coverage, TerreStar is still pursuing partners to help it build out an alternative 4G wireless network. It hopes to create a combined satellite and terrestrial network using its spectrum holdings in the 2 GHz band under a regulatory scheme known as Ancillary Terrestrial Component, or ATC.

TerreStar has been seeking partners for that venture for a couple of years, but the bankruptcy last Friday of the North American business of ICO Global Communications may have put a damper on things. Both TerreStar and ICO had permission from the Federal Communications Commission to deploy these ATC networks, despite vigorous complaints from the cellular industry. When ICO shareholder and spectrum speculator-extraordinaire Craig McCaw decided to take cash rather than a larger position in ICO last week, as decisions related to the bankruptcy filing were being made, analyst Tim Farrar noted that that the value of the ATC spectrum had diminished. The rules governing an ATC network require the launch of two very expensive satellites and the construction of a land-based network.

Farrar said in an interview with me, “There’s so much spectrum out there — even the Clearwire spectrum could come back onto the market — so there are lots of options that don’t have the complex ATC angles. The best they can hope for is ATC being 3-5 years away.”

TerreStar’s CTO, Dennis Matheson disagrees. He says the launch of chips from Qualcomm next year will enable handsets and data cards that can deliver LTE-speeds in the 2 GHz spectrum that TerreStar owns. He says that network could be deployed in 2010 and working by 2011. Harbinger Capital Partners, the hedge fund that owns a significant stake in TerreStar as well as other large spectrum holders, has been pitching this hybrid wireless network to potential investors such as Google.

But that’s an uncertain project, so in the meantime, TerreStar will offer handsets to consumers and governments through a partnership with AT&T. The soon-to-be-launched satellite will be able to deliver uninspiring speeds of 64 kbps down on the smaller, consumer-style handsets, while truck-mounted phones such as those used by emergency workers could receive speeds of up to 400 kbps down. Matheson says the plan is to market the phones as providing more extensive coverage than cellular, and as a fail-safe in the event of disaster. Given the speeds and the fact that satellite phones offer better coverage primarily in uninhabited, rural areas, but not underground or inside buildings, where most consumers experience dropped calls, I think the consumer opportunity is pretty small.

So if no one buys into the ATC efforts, TerreStar may be reliving rather than reinventing the failed satellite model of 15 years ago.

http://gigaom.com/2009/05/21/the-ominous-return-of-t...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 02-Jun-09 11:16:26
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
ALVARION EXTENDS LEADERSHIP IN WiMAX NETWORK DEPLOYMENTS

ITWeb
02.06.09

Alvarion, the world's leading provider of WiMAX and wireless broadband solutions, today announced substantial growth of its WiMAX network deployments globally.

Five years after being introduced, Alvarion's WiMAX platform continues to be deployed by service providers as the foundation of their next-generation broadband wireless networks. Driven by the demand of broadband around the globe, Alvarion's overall cumulative WiMAX shipments have now reached more than $500 million. The company continues its leading position as the preferred WiMAX vendor through its innovative Open WiMAX business model that continues to grow the ecosystem. Facing the market's growing demand for broadband services, Alvarion enjoys a steady increase in WiMAX customer deployments.

Alvarion's impressive list of WiMAX deployments continues to grow with over 40 commercial WiMAX networks in Latin America, over 60 in Africa, over 25 in North America, over 35 in Western Europe, over 60 in Eastern Europe and over 30 in Asia.

Alvarion's expanded list of over 200 global partners, including OEM, local and distribution partners, are instrumental in extending the reach of WiMAX around the globe. Alvarion's entrepreneurial approach of collaborating with a range of global and local partners has helped service providers cost-effectively deploy WiMAX for a wide variety of applications and business models.

This news comes at the WiMAX Forum Global Congress, in Amsterdam, where Alvarion will be holding a live demonstration of mobile Internet applications over mobile WiMAX, using the company's WiMAX Forum Certified BreezeMAX base station.

Alvarion is also carrying this message to WiMAX Taipei 2009 Event, where the company is participating in Computex. Visitors will have the opportunity to learn more about Alvarion's market leadership and WiMAX success in the region.

“Access to broadband can bring lots of opportunities to people around the world and spur economic growth. Operators are looking to introduce new revenue generating services and at the same time reduce their cost base by introducing flat IP architecture with lower cost wireless broadband technologies such as WiMAX,” said Tzvika Friedman, President and CEO of Alvarion. “Alvarion continues to transform the wireless and mobile broadband industry as a trusted partner to operators. Our extensive portfolio of end-to-end WiMAX solutions, global experience, turnkey services and state-of-the-art technology makes us the vendor of choice for WiMAX. We are extremely focused on the success of our customers and all of these networks are characterised by satisfied customers with a successful business case that enables enhanced wireless broadband services to the end-users.”

Alvarion press release issued by Watt Communications & G Watt Design

http://tinyurl.com/mqpuhk

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User tibtib123
(learned) Thu 04-Jun-09 09:21:00
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
I know Libya are introducing WIMAX soon, It is perfect for Africa!

mobile broadband contract phone and skype when will it end!!!

The Whole Truth
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 04-Jun-09 10:40:19
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: tibtib123] [link to this post]
 
WiMAX INDUSTRY HOPING FOR ECONOMIC STIMULUS BOOST

REUTERS
Harro ten Wolde 03.06.09

Companies working on WiMAX high-speed mobile data technology are hoping government stimulus packages inject billions of dollars into wireless broadband, boosting take-up of the new technology.

WiMAX has been competing for the status of next generation mobile technology, but has largely lost the battle to Long Term Evolution (LTE), which has become mobile operators' favoured solution as it can be bolted on to existing systems.

Many analysts say WiMAX is destined to be a niche player in a market expected to total $45 billion (27.4 billion pounds) in 2009, according to research group Gartner. However WiMAX companies hope government stimulus packages could revive appetite for the technology.

"One of the biggest things people are doing because of the crisis is stimulus packages for rural broadband -- in the U.S. alone (the spend is) $7.2 billion," said Tzvika Friedman, chief executive at Alvarion, a leading WiMAX equipment maker.

"That's one of the big advantages of WiMAX now, as much as we suffer from the economic crisis, we also enjoy it," Friedman told Reuters on the sidelines of a WiMAX conference in Amsterdam, estimating over $1 billion could be spent on WiMAX.

Ron Resnick, president and chairman of the WiMAX Forum, the main industry group, said governments recognised investing in broadband is important for economic recovery.

"The most appropriate way of doing it (investing) quickly is probably wireless," said Andy McKinnon, who works for Motorola's 4G unit.

SPEND IT NOW

WiMAX stands to benefit from the fact that governments want to spend on stimulus measures now, with few other wireless broadband technologies available for quick deployment.

"Other technologies are not there yet and they cannot fix the problem," Motorola's McKinnon added, referring to LTE, which is expected to be available as early as next year.

Although WiMAX is available to 430 million people, only 3.6 million people had subscribed to the service at the end of 2008, according to data from researcher Informa.

"There is a place for WiMAX but it will be very niche as a global mobility access technology," said Gartner analyst Sylvain Fabre. "WiMAX will be a minor mobile technology compared to LTE which is going to be the next dominant access technology worldwide.

Fabre said WiMAX would realistically get a few percentage points of the total worldwide wireless subscribers.

"It may be niche but it is also a completely new market, which eventually could become as big as the current mobile market," said Dr. Hung Song, vice president of Samsung Electronics' Global Marketing Group for the Telecom Systems and Network business.

China's largest telecom gear maker Huawei Technologies said on Monday it expected WiMAX equipment sales to grow in the next 19 months to $1 billion, especially in emerging markets where fixed line networks are poorly developed.

Governments then face some tough choices on which technology to back.

"They are spending it to get us out of the recession, so logically you would think some of that money would end up with WiMAX," said Barry West, president of wireless high-speed services provider Clearwire.

(Editing by Tarmo Virki and David Holmes)

http://tinyurl.com/pqrgxe

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 04-Jun-09 11:08:13
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
FEMTO FORUM AND WiMAX FORUM TO ADVANCE WiMAX FEMTOCELLS

Business Wire
03.06.09

Two bodies co-operate to optimise WiMAX femtocell specifications and ensure full potential of the technology

The Femto Forum, the independent industry association that supports femtocell deployment worldwide, and the WiMAX Forum,, the non-profit organisation dedicated to the deployment and certification of WiMAX technologies, today agreed to collaborate on the development of WiMAX Femtocell Access Point (WFAP) specifications that will address topics such as end-to-end QoS, provisioning, network entry and authentication, power optimisation, and mobility management. The specifications will also support for emergency services, lawful intercept, and location-based services.

Considering the growing demand for broadband wireless access inside homes and offices while enabling mobility and roaming across wide area networks, WiMAX operators and vendors have identified the need for femtocell solutions to increase the aggregate cell throughput per unit area and accordingly to improve the related quality of intra-cell links, particularly in indoor environments.

“Femtocells will provide a powerful new tool for WiMAX operators. By significantly increasing the number of cells in a wireless network using femtocells, operators can deliver a dramatically better service than using macro networks alone,” said Simon Saunders, Chairman of the Femto Forum. “This partnership will not only enable vendor interoperability and increased economies of scale thereby driving competition- it will also help to support far-reaching new femtocell applications.”

“The operators in our community are looking toward femtocells to improve coverage and capacity while retaining the benefits of end-to-end Quality of Service management that is one of the great benefits of the WiMAX network,“ said Ron Resnick, president and chairman of the WiMAX Forum. “WiMAX specifications will support WiMAX certification of interoperable vendor products. We look forward to interactions with the Femto Forum to ensure that our specifications take advantage of its expertise regarding industry best practices for femtocell deployments.”

About the WiMAX Forum

The WiMAX Forum is an industry-led, not-for-profit organisation formed to certify and promote the compatibility and interoperability of broadband wireless products based upon the harmonised IEEE 802.16/ETSI HiperMAN standard. A WiMAX Forum goal is to accelerate the introduction of these systems into the marketplace. WiMAX Forum Certified products are fully interoperable and support broadband fixed, portable and mobile services. Along these lines, the WiMAX Forum works closely with service providers and regulators to ensure that WiMAX Forum Certified systems meet customer and government requirements. For more information about the WiMAX Forum and its activities, please visit www.wimaxforum.org.

About The Femto Forum

Femtocells are low-power wireless access points that operate in licensed spectrum to connect standard mobile devices to a mobile operator’s network using residential DSL or cable broadband connections. The Femto Forum www.femtoforum.org was set up in 2007 to promote the wide-scale adoption of femtocells. The Forum supports and drives the adoption of industry wide standards and common architectures to enable the widespread adoption & deployment of femtocells by operators around the world. It directs and implements a multi-faceted marketing campaign raising the profile, driving technology development & deployment and promoting the potential of femto solutions among industry stakeholders, journalists, analysts, regulators, special interest groups, standards bodies and consumers.

http://tinyurl.com/p7w95u

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 10-Jun-09 10:58:52
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Hi Bill and the guys at Vfast, sorry to muscle in again, but I think that the story below has relevance to GB.
I hope you are lobbying hard for a share of Gordo's cake.
Puzzle: why do Freedom4 users never post here?
Shock/horror - today's headline news about pathetic mobile B/band speeds!!


WIRELESS AND THE STIMULUS BILL: A TOUGH ROAD?

WiMAX and Wi-Fi Will Need to Educate to Grab a Piece of the Stimulus Pie

exchange
Tara Seals 09/06/09

For WiMAX and Wi-Fi operators, the broadband stimulus money represents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. But when they're going up against so many fixed-operator heavy hitters, can they make the case to non-techie types that wireless broadband is a viable option and worthy of government funding?

The people at the Department of Agriculture and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) have a wide array of options to choose from when deciding how to allot the cash for projects — and they’re not technologists, meaning that WiMAX is likely to be viewed as less proven than the more mainstream copper or fibre technologies. As is Wi-Fi, widely known as having failed in the municipal broadband biz the first time around.

But it’s not just perception that wireless companies will need to overcome. Those gaining Rural Utilities Service funding from the Department of Agriculture will be required to use RUS-approved equipment, very little of which is wireless broadband gear. And timelines are conspiring against new wireless equipment joining the list: a product must be in use in a trial project for six months before it can be approved.

Then there’s the issue of the heavy-hitting and well-funded RBOCs and cable MSOs, many of which are lobbying, intensively, for the stimulus money to circumvent providers entirely, instead to be spent on institutions directly, which can build their own networks.

In all, wireless providers have a lot on which to educate the grant-reviewers.

Why Wireless Works for Rural

Why wireless to serve the un- and underserved? It comes down to a classic equation: How much money is needed to bring broadband to how many houses, to how many people, and at what speed?

“The business case this funding is addressing is so challenging because these towns are so far spread out and sparsely populated, so to serve them takes a technology that allow a nice trade-off between good coverage and the speeds they’re looking for,” said Ashish Sharma, vice president of corporate market development at WiMAX vendor Alvarion Ltd., which has been very active in underserved markets worldwide like Africa and Eastern Europe and offers RUS-approved gear. “Cellular can’t play well because it is narrowband — excellent for voice but not enough capacity to efficiently provide broadband to residents sprinkled across big geographic areas.”

Sharma also notes that more concentrated towns will be a target for DSL and fiber, but wireless shines in the time-to-market category. “The Rural Utility Service program – a lot of the funding goes to fixed technologies, but those technologies are limited in terms of how they can scale,” he noted. “And they’re facing very stiff deadlines where they have to roll out networks very quickly. So I don’t foresee all the money going to fixed. It will be a mix of both.”

There’s also the question of sheer economics. “In true rural America there is no contest, because for every dollar spent on a wireless technology, you’d spend eight or 10 to deploy a wired equivalent,” said Den Cubley, CEO at ERF Wireless, which uses a mix of Wi-Fi and WiMAX, licensed and unlicensed, to serve 150,000 square miles in New Mexico, Texas and Louisiana. More than 90 percent covers very rural settings. “The economics of the situation dictate wireless, because there’s not enough population density to justify the expenditure on cabling. Then too you’d need the funds to operate, maintain and service the network, and wireless is a much easier architecture with which to do that.”

Showing Wireless Can Fit the Mandate

The economics present in wireless can fulfill the basic mandate of the stimulus bill: to get as much broadband as possible out to as many people as possible that don’t have it now. Demonstrating this is critical when there’s only so much funding to go around, meaning that wide swaths of the most sparsely populated areas might get left behind. “The really truly rural areas, a lot of them are just not that different from 50 years ago or 100 years ago,” said Cubley. “It’s farming, not a lot of industry and no opportunity unless you want to be a farmer or rancher. And someone wouldn't locate a business there, and employees wouldn't move there. The only ones that are growing are the ones that have solved the problem of getting communications going.

That’s because it doesn’t matter if a manufacturing plant is 200 miles from a city, or right in a city — as long as the communications are stable and can support modern business processes. “It's almost like water was 100 years ago,” said Cubley. “Places will offer almost anything in the way of incentives to get broadband because if they can get the community to grow, property values grow and opportunities grow.”

Deployment Scenarios

At least one analyst is bullish on wireless prospects: “The ARRA represents a windfall for wireless service providers as well as for satellite service providers,” said Stan Schatt, analyst at ABI Research. “It will have an enormous impact on Wi-Fi and wireless broadband vendors. It will also immediately benefit a number of specific vertical industries including health care, education, homeland security, the environment, and the nation’s electricity infrastructure.”

There are enough successful use cases to sway those holding the purse strings. For instance, to counter the LECs, ERF can show that it is effectively partnering with municipalities in a successful public-private partnership. It has an agreement with the state of Louisiana where it can use state police towers free of charge in return for providing statewide bandwidth to municipal departments. Then it can sell wireless broadband to local citizens. The city wins; ERF has a viable business case; and no one has to worry about bureaucrats getting into the telecom business.

For its part, Alvarion won a contract to provide WiMAX equipment for an RUS-funded project earlier this year with Main Street Broadband LLC, which received $34 million in funding for deployment in 66 markets covering 129 rural communities in Florida and Georgia.

Schatt points out that success also will hinge on showing how wireless offers some unique applications. In health care for instance, Wi-Fi-enabled mobile devices and sensors, communications systems linking health networks, telepresence, wireless LAN equipment, and Wi-Fi-enabled video surveillance systems are all becoming must-haves, a boon for WISPs looking to bring that capability to rural hospitals on a municipal level.

“There are plenty of unique opportunities for wireless, and I think the agencies will see that as long as enough supporting and expository materials are submitted with the application,” said Sharma. “Education is going to be critic

http://tinyurl.com/lwmmbm

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 10-Jun-09 11:30:44
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Mr Li please note. Britain is waiting.

HUAWEI CLAIMS WORLD FIRST WITH ITS NEW WiMAX DISTRIBUTED BASE STATION

MIS-asia
10.06.09

Giant telecommunications networks provider, Huawei which now serves 36 of the world’s top 50 operators, plus more than one billion users worldwide, says that its new WiMAX distributed base station (DBS) with four transmitters and four receivers (4T4R), will enable operators to reduce the number of base station sites in certain areas and lower their total cost of ownership.

WiMAX is a telecommunications technology providing wireless data, voice and video over long distances and Huawei is China’s largest networking and telecommunications equipment supplier.

Huawei Wireless vice president of CDMA & WiMAX, Tang Xinhong, said the world’s first WiMAX distributed base station provides substantial improvements to the coverage and performance of WiMAX networks.

He said it increases operator efficiency by supporting multi-standard convergence and could also be configured into two 2T2R base stations so it can handle different coverage configurations.

Great cost efficiency

“As a leading industry innovator, Huawei is committed to supporting the development of the WiMAX industry by providing solutions like the new 4T4R WiMAX DBS, which will help operators deploy networks that are much more efficient and cost-effective,” he said.”

Huawei said its state-of-the-art 4T4R WiMAX DBS was based on a fourth-generation base station platform, and also incorporates green technologies such as natural cooling and a high-efficiency power amplifier. The company said this allows for the new DBS to greatly reduce the energy consumption and achieve better cost efficiency.

As of the first quarter of this year, Huawei said it has been awarded 41 commercial WiMAX 802.16e contracts worldwide, including Globe in the Philippines, STC in Saudi Arabia, Mobilink and Augere in Pakistan, and Méditel in Morocco.

http://mis-asia.com/news/articles/huawei-claims-wima...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 11-Jun-09 10:10:04
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Seems to be signs of recent WiMAX Green Shoots around the world (except for UK).

TELECOM ITALIA AND ARIA PARTNER FOR WIMAX IN ITALY

OVUM
Julien Grivolas 10.06.09

Italian WiMAX operator Aria has won the right to use Telecom Italia's 3.5GHz spectrum to supply WiMAX services in Sardinia and in the central and southern regions of Italy. In addition, Aria will be able to use Telecom Italia's transport network to support its WiMAX network. In return, the Italian incumbent will have access to Aria's nationwide wholesale services.
Incumbent Telecom Italia to use WiMAX as a complement to DSL
This partnership is in line with our belief that the most likely business models to succeed using WiMAX technology in the developed markets of Europe are those targeting users that have limited access to alternative broadband technologies, as detailed in our report WiMAX operator strategies in Europe. Other incumbents such as Telenor and Lattelecom already use WiMAX in previously unserved areas but, unlike Telecom Italia, they have invested in the rollout of their own WiMAX infrastructure.

To date, Telecom Italia has not used the three 3.5GHz regional licences it acquired for €13.8 million. However, like all operators in the current economic climate, it is paying close attention to its spending. Thanks to the agreement, Aria will incur the deployment and maintenance costs for the WiMAX network in exchange for access to Telecom Italia's spectrum and its existing transport capability. The agreement also allows Telecom Italia to comply with the regulatory obligations associated with the granting of the licence at a minimal cost. Until now Telecom Italia has done almost nothing with its spectrum. It will also contribute to Telecom Italia's branding and corporate responsibility image, as it shows the incumbent's commitment to bridging the digital divide in the underserved areas of Italy.

A win-win partnership
If the deal sweetens the WiMAX investment pill for the incumbent, for Aria it significantly reinforces its wholesale strategy as it has attracted the incumbent as a nationwide customer. Compared to its competitors, this brings a great deal of credibility to its value proposition and will potentially instil confidence in its service capability in order to attract other customers. However, conversely, it may also be perceived as being less disruptive than other WiMAX providers because it works so closely with the incumbent. Telecom Italia's WiMAX pricing strategy, when revealed, will hopefully help solve this question.

Another positive from the partnership for Aria is the agreement related to the transport network. Deploying WiMAX base stations implies that the traffic generated has to be backhauled efficiently to allow customers to enjoy a good user experience. There are few alternatives for a small service provider with nationwide ambitions: deploy its own transport network nationwide; rent capacity to companies that may also be competitors; or a mixture of both. By partnering with the incumbent, Aria has answered this challenging aspect of the WiMAX equation.

Italy's WiMAX deployments are not too far behind
A couple of years ago Italy faced a lot of criticism that it would be badly positioned to benefit from WiMAX because it was one of the last countries to allocate 3.5GHz spectrum. However, several companies have now launched WiMAX services, mostly using the mobile WiMAX standard even if it is for the provision of fixed wireless services. For example, the main spectrum owners (Aria, Linkem and Retelit) have all commercially launched services, along with some smaller, local players such as Mandarin.

Therefore, Italy is actually not too far behind in its WiMAX rollouts, certainly when compared to what is happening with 3.5GHz spectrum in other Western European countries such as France. There is still only very limited WiMAX activity in France, even though the spectrum was allocated 20 months earlier than in Italy. This has led the French regulator to track market developments more closely, but with only limited improvements, as demonstrated by the market update published a couple of months ago.

http://www.ovum.com/news/euronews.asp?id=7941

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 11-Jun-09 10:26:47
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
INTEL PROMOTE FAST, WIDESPREAD DEPLOYMENT OF WIMAX SERVICES IN JAPAN

UQ Communications WiMAX Commercial Service Details Disclosed;
WiMAX-Embedded Laptops Introduced with Intel® Centrino® 2 Processor Technology

WebWire
10.06.09

TOKYO. – UQ Communications Inc. and Intel Corporation today announced their extended collaboration to promote and expand "UQ WiMAX" the commercially available WiMAX service from UQ Communications in Japan. Scheduled to launch on July 1, UQ Communications will offer new services to meet the diverse consumer demands for mobile Internet broadband use. Working closely with OEMs, Intel is providing embedded WiMAX laptops based on Intel® Centrino® 2 processor technology to enable mobile WiMAX broadband Internet access. The two companies will also work with PC vendors and MVNOs to deliver a range of initiatives and promotional activities driving the adoption of WiMAX technology and creating greater awareness for the global WiMAX ecosystem.

WiMAX is the only solution available today that is meeting the demand for the mobile Internet. With WiMAX, users can enjoy rich, interactive content outdoors and on the go as mobile broadband Internet access traditionally requires a fixed broadband connection. Together, Intel and UQ are helping to enable wireless Internet connectivity with WiMAX, forming alliances with a number of companies in the industry and offering a range of new digital equipment and services designed to enhance user experience.

As part of this new initiative, UQ Communications has unveiled a novel fee structure that will make it easy for new users to subscribe. Meanwhile, Intel will offer the Intel WiMAX/Wi-Fi Link 5150, an embedded module supporting both wireless LAN and WiMAX, providing flexible Internet connectivity and high-speed communications with WiMAX. Toshiba, Panasonic and Onkyo have today unveiled notebook PCs which integrate the module and Intel® Centrino® 2 processor technology. The laptops, as well as other products, are scheduled to debut next month in Japan.

Said Takashi Tanaka, president of UQ Communications: "We are glad to welcome this major milestone. Working with Intel, we are on the road to full mobile broadband access, and, remarkably, in just 18 months since UQ Communications obtained a Mobile WiMAX license. A feature of Mobile WiMAX is that its infrastructure is open, both to people who want to use WiMAX, and to businesses that want to enter the WiMAX market. In collaboration with PC makers, MVNOs, and various other industries, we will enable true mobile broadband access, with UQ constructing a high-speed, advanced WiMAX network, while Intel enables WiMAX modules to be built into all kinds of devices"

"Intel looks forward to the UQ Communications WiMAX service launch next month in Japan" said Sean Maloney, executive vice president and chief sales and marketing officer of Intel Corporation. "The next-generation wireless Internet broadband from UQ will be one of the most advanced networks in the world, further driving global adoption of WiMAX. Intel also welcomes today’s announcement that Intel® Centrino® 2 processor technology-based laptops with embedded WiMAX will be introduced in the Japanese market, a huge leap forward in the continued development and expansion of the global WiMAX ecosystem"

In addition to working with UQ on embedded technology, Intel Capital invested $43 million in the company to help continue the nationwide expansion of WiMAX service.

http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=96866

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Sun 14-Jun-09 20:25:33
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Sorry, this is a lengthy read, pretty comprehensive overview though.

WiMAX FIGHTS LTE SHUTOUT

Wireless Asia
– By John C. Tanner 12.06.09

One of the notable things about the 2008 Mobile World Congress was the major splash made by WiMAX, a technology that the GSM Association has denounced as a niche technology with virtually no future as the world's cellcos inevitably evolve to LTE. Yet there was the WiMAX Forum promoting over 40 stands worth of real equipment and boasting over 200 commercial deployments.

Almost as if by response, the 2009 MWC was all about LTE. Numerous heavy-hitters showcased LTE gear in action during the event, with LTE base stations running live video and other bandwidth-heavy apps. Motorola executives drove a van around Placa Espanya running LTE between the van and its booth via two eNode Bs running raw 8-Mbps MPEG-4 video with no buffering or FEC of any kind. The demo went off without a hitch - the handover from one Node B to another produced a bit of picture breakup, but given this was unbuffered video sharing a link with two laptops running YouTube videos, it wasn't bad.

Real-world conditions, of course, won't be nearly as accommodating, but new results released that week from the LTE/SAE Test Initiative (LSTI), which puts an emphasis on real-world conditions in its testing, were encouraging. The LSTI wrapped up its proof-of-concept phase earlier this year, and all up, LTE is essentially living up to the 3GPP's performance benchmarks for downlink/uplink throughput performance and latency.

Put another way, LTE works. It hasn't been vetted for interoperability yet - that's next on the LSTI's docket -but it works.

That was this year's LTE message. It works as advertised, and it's coming sooner than you thought. This year, actually. Various vendors like Ericsson, Motorola, Huawei, ZTE and Alcatel-Lucent intend to have LTE gear commercially available in the second half of this year. And according to Pyramid Research, a dozen operators are committed to launching commercial LTE services sometime next year, including NTT DoCoMo, TeliaSonera and Verizon. Another 15 operators plan to roll out LTE in 2011-2012.

That would seem to be grim news for WiMAX, whose chief selling point has been that LTE is years away from commercial reality and thanks to the rise of smart-phones and dongles, demand for "real" mobile Internet needs to be met now. The spectre of LTE just around the corner makes that pitch a little harder to sell.

On the other hand, that presumes the market will only accept one or the other, not both. And the market has already accepted WiMAX to some degree. The WiMAX Forum says the technology had racked up deployments in almost 140 countries (albeit not all of them fully commercial and many of them as wireless DSL rather than fully mobile offerings) as of April this year. Asia has already seen high-profile launches in Malaysia and Taiwan, and will see another in July this year when UQ Communications - a consortium that includes EV-DO operator KDDI - launches commercial service in Japan, where LTE is expected to go live next year.

Moreover, some doubts remain over just how much of a head start WiMAX will ultimately have over LTE - and how much of a difference it will make in any case.

Time to market: overrated

Certainly the LTE camp is predictably unimpressed with WiMAX's head start in the wireless broadband space, effectively dismissing the "window of opportunity" advantage as irrelevant.


"Time-to-market does not equal success," says Dan Warren, director of technology at the GSM Association, arguing that GSM's history and footprint gives LTE "two equally important things that WiMAX lacks -pedigree and a pre-existing ecosystem."

On the other hand, the same is less true for the early-adopter market partly responsible for driving LTE's accelerated development - many of them cellcos who happened to be outside of the typical W-CDMA cellco demographic, and thus have an incentive to push on to 4G sooner rather than later.

"CDMA operators like Verizon and KDDI are in a hurry to deploy LTE because they are stuck on a one-way street with EV-DO," says Bo Ribbing, strategic marketing director for Ericsson. "China Mobile has TD-SCDMA and wants to move quickly to TD-LTE. And TeliaSonera, which was the first to sign an LTE contract, is sharing its HSPA network with someone else and wants their own network."

For most W-CDMA cellcos, though, LTE isn't an immediate concern, with many currently not planning to deploy LTE for another two or three years. Some are also still considering the interim step of HSPA+, which boosts data speeds to 21 Mbps, although vendors like Motorola counsel against this.

"The window of opportunity for HSPA+ is only one and a half years, so we recommend to operators to go sooner rather than later to LTE because of the benefits of lower TCO, faster time to market and you can better meet mass-market traffic-revenue challenges at a lower cost per bit," says Daisy Lam, senior marketing manager of wireless broadband technologies for the Home & Networks Mobility division of Motorola Asia Pacific.

So far, only a handful of cellcos have adopted HSPA+, but one such cellco - Hong Kong CSL - swears by it.

"HSPA+ has a lot of life in it because everyone is scaling back their capex, and LTE is a costly upgrade," says CSL's chief technology officer Christian Daigneault. "LTE will come, but you need a hell of a lot of spectrum if you're going to achieve the 120 Mbps they're promising."

It's also worth noting that CSL itself has plenty of spectrum to play with - 900 MHz, 1800 MHz (for which it has two licenses), 21. GHz and its newly-awarded 2.6 GHz. And it's using new software-defined radio (SDR) base stations supplied by ZTE to refarm and reuse spectrum across all of its frequency bands.

"The regulatory environment in Hong Kong allows us to refarm spectrum however we like based on market trends and technology, which gives us much more flexible use of our capacity," Daigneault says.

LTE base stations will have the same capability, and that's a potential advantage over WiMAX, which so far has typically been allocated single frequency bands, in markets where it operates.

The first delay

However, Verizon - which made a splash in Barcelona by explaining its game plan for LTE, complete with a list of supply contract winners - has already dropped the first bomb on LTE's ambitious timeline. The US carrier originally planned to have its first commercial LTE services up and running in 20 to 30 markets the first half of 2010, and nation-wide coverage (in the cities, at least) by the end of 2013.


But in a conference call in mid-May, wireless chief Lowell McAdam said the commercial launches would be pushed back at least six months to the second half of next year, with national coverage now scheduled to be completed in 2015 - two years later than originally stated.

McAdam chalked the delay up to a decision to go slow on LTE and "see what we need to do so we don't get ahead of ourselves in putting in capacity that we don't need."

But Verizon may also be taking a page from 3G's own chequered history, observes Caroline Gabriel, head of research at Rethink Research.

"This may not be the last revision of Verizon's time-scales, and the story is a familiar one from the days of the European 3G bubble," Gabriel said in a research note. "Launching prematurely with ill-tested equipment and a shortage of devices would be worse than delaying roll-out."

And a device shortage is a real possibility. Qualcomm - which supplies most of the chipsets that end up in Verizon products - plans to have chips for LTE datacards generally available next year, by which time handset chips will only be available for sampling. With device product cycles typically lasting 18 months - and with Verizon's well-known policy of rigorous device testing to meet its high standards of quality - Verizon's LTE offering will have to get by on dongles or single-mode gadgets until the end of 2011, Gabriel says.

Device strategies

To be fair, WiMAX has been dealing with the same issue. WiMAX networks today ship mostly with either CPE for fixed-wireless offerings, or dongles, although a few laptops with embedded WiMAX have also appeared in select markets. Dongles are a good entry-level approach to get consumers using the service, but WiMAX proponents - as well as the GSMA, for that matter - believe that wireless broadband's success hinges on embedding it into more devices, starting with laptops and netbooks, but moving on to all kinds of consumer electronics devices like cameras, MP3 players and gaming consoles.

The problem, says Peter Cannistra, VP of market development at Clearwire, is that while CE manufacturers "buy the WiMAX story", they're still hesitant to add to their BOM when they're already running on razor-thin margins and WiMAX's business model is still a work in progress.

"WiMAX players need to work harder to make WiMAX compelling enough for the CE manufacturers to go forward," Cannistra says.

The need for multiple embedded WiMAX devices isn't just about providing the variety of choice that drives 3G services today - it's also the key to competing against HSPA/EV-DO services now, and LTE in the future, according to Takashi Tanaka, president of Japan's UQ Communications.

In his WiMAX Forum Asia keynote in April, Tanaka said that Japanese mobile users are generally unhappy with handsets as a mobile Internet device. "Most mobile users in Japan use mobile Internet [HSPA and EV-DO], but complain regularly about speed, the limited browser, limited content, small screen and small keyboard," he said. "WiMAX can meet those needs, so why not deploy it?"

More to the point, however, users in Japan have lots of gadgets that they want to connect to the Internet, but mobile operators have difficulty with this because traditionally, a mobile service contract is tied to just one device.


Consequently, UQ intends to offer multi-device mobile deals, where a flat-rate monthly fee allows a subscriber to connect, say, a laptop/netbook/dongle, an MP3 player and a gaming device.

The risks of all-IP

Such a strategy gets to the heart of the way in which WiMAX could set itself apart from HSPA and LTE. At its core, WiMAX is designed to be an open IP-based network. That means it has the freedom to try out new business models such as open access - i.e. as long as it's certified by the WiMAX Forum, your device will work on our network, and you can include more than one under your service contract - and selling devices through retail consumer electronics stores. It also means the ability to offer more flexible tariff packages, where one can buy a day pass, for example.

To be sure, LTE is also designed to be all-IP and can exploit many of the same benefits. A number of vendors are already urging cellcos looking at LTE to make sure their core networks can handle the QoS functionalities on an end-to-end basis.

"There are several important aspects that are crucial to the LTE core," says Francesco Masetti-Placci, VP of solutions, strategy and marketing at Alcatel-Lucent China. "The first is latency requirements, less than 10ms, which cannot be supported with current architectures. Also, as you can expect a larger number of simultaneous users, you need more sophisticated processing power in the routers. And the architecture needs to be designed in a more distributed way to support the four classes of QoS under UMTS, which has to be mapped into the new architecture. Then policy based end to end QoS can be enforced."

However, for cellcos moving to all-IP, the potential snag may not be the technology to enable it, but the open-access business model that comes with it and runs counter to the existing cellco model of locked devices and two-year contracts.

To date, cellcos have been slow even to adopt IP models like flat rate access. UQ intends to exploit this to the limit, says Tanaka, who says that Japanese mobile users aren't just unhappy with the handsets as Internet devices - they also don't like being locked into contracts and see 3G operators as "the bad guys".

All of this represents a major and crucial opportunity for WiMAX to differentiate itself now, says Gabriel of Rethink Research.

"Of course, LTE will be closer to WiMAX in many key areas, such as all-IP and spectrum allocations, but with widespread LTE several years away, the priority for the WiMAX community in 2009 is to put clear water between its own platform and HSPA/EV-DO, and demonstrate that the systems have very different functions, all needed in the mobile broadband world," she says.

4G: where's the money?

As telecoms continue 4G equipment rollouts, one question looms: Will wireless data revenues keep pace with services offered?

Many analysts say no, unless telecoms find a killer, money-making 4G service.

"I've always noted that what it really takes [to drive 4G revenue] is an application that needs to consume that bandwidth," said Mike Jude, a program manager of consumer communications services at Stratecast.

"Currently, I think most LTE and 3.5 [later generation, faster 3G] to 4G deployment plans depend on this notion of mobile Web access or mobile data access as being the driver. But really, if you're looking at the total population of total users of wireless, not that many of them use that much data."

And not many are currently willing to pay much more just for higher bandwidth.

Instead, Jude and others believe, some basic models such as the all-you-can-eat flat-rate need to be fundamentally rethought or at least subsidized with high-margin services.

"Everybody's looking for services that they can provide [for] high-margin that would depend on that kind of bandwidth requirement," Jude said. "If it's a service that people want and it requires that kind of bandwidth, presumably they'd pay for that."

If wireless providers launch 4G services without a clear idea of exactly what those ARPU-driving services are, wireless providers may face the same crisis the wireline providers are facing: plummeting revenue-per-bit even as infrastructure upgrade costs skyrocket and entrenched consumers protest any change to the revenue model status quo.

H. Paris Burstyn, a senior analyst with Ovum, said wireless carriers need to embrace the death of the minute and move past it in terms of billing.

"Carriers are ... fixated by minutes of use, and that's a terrible way to think about digital service because it's not about minutes of use, it's about megabits, and a growing quantity of data," Burstyn said. "The key is to figure out how to move the payment metric from minutes to megabits, and then tiers of service beyond that, which spills into net neutrality, and dealing with power users."

Jude said that there is some time to adjust, particularly with 4G. So far, however, a rational business plan has yet to emerge that will match the costs of 4G capital and operational expenses with revenue, Jude said.

Whatever the answer, it won't be found overnight.

"It's a very complex problem, and monetising it is the big issue," Burstyn said. "Moving the consumer and the billing paradigm to something that's linked to the amount of data you use is going to be a very complicated and evolutionary step-by-step kind of thing."

Michael Morisy / SearchTelecom

http://www.telecomasia.net/article.php?id_article=13...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User sherly
(newbie) Mon 15-Jun-09 13:06:59
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: Ashaman] [link to this post]
 
Hi check out this link for more information about Wimax wireless broadband
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 17-Jun-09 11:09:51
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: sherly] [link to this post]
 
Bet there's no mention in the Carter Report, of the delayed spectrum auction, the under-utilised UK Broadband tranche or even the word WiMAX.
C'mon Mr Li do your bit for Blighty.


HUAWEI SEALS RUSSIAN WiMAX DEAL

Unstrung
— Michelle Donegan, European Editor

Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. has landed a contract to supply equipment to Russia's newest WiMAX operator in a deal that comes with a $100 million loan from Chinese banks.

News of Russia's new WiMAX start-up comes from Icon Private Equity , which just announced that it will invest $200 million in the operator to roll out wireless broadband throughout Russia. The new operator has a license in the 3.5 GHz frequency band and will operate under the brand name Freshtel.

Additional funding for the network deployment will come by way of a loan from Chinese financial institutions, according to Icon. An Icon spokeswoman tells Unstrung the loan will be $100 million.

Icon has also invested $100 million in the Ukrainian WiMAX operator, UHT, which will take on the Freshtel brand later this summer, according to an Icon spokeswoman.

Freshtel's CEO Sergei Avdeev (former JSC Vimpel-Communications exec.) will have responsibility for the Russian and Ukrainian operations.

For Huawei, the deal adds to the momentum the vendor claims it has in WiMAX. The company recently said that it expected WiMAX revenues to double from $500 million in 2009 to $1 billion in 2010.

According to Icon's spokeswoman, the additional financing from Chinese banks was not a factor in the decision to select Huawei. "There is no funding so far… The money is there if we need it for further network rollout," she says.

Icon says Freshtel's goal is to have network coverage for 20 million people by the end of this year. The operator will launch commercial service in October, according to the spokeswoman.

Russia is hot for WiMAX and it's the first market where High Tech Computer Corp. (HTC) will launch its WiMAX smart-phone.

http://www.unstrung.com/blog.asp?blog_sectionid=414&...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User kijoma
(regular) Thu 18-Jun-09 10:45:00
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
HI,

Too true, as you can see though it is tied up in a load of red tape and our problem is we are too busy doing to have the time to wine and dine with MP's and chew through the political labyrinth..

So ultimately there is a good chance, as has happened with BT before, public money and lots of it will be squandered on hair brained ventures and inefficient incumbents while the cost efficient solutions with proven track record will have to run self financed (We are entirely self financed anyway, i think Vfast get support from Kent County council).

We did once ask about funding for infrastructure to enable areas but were told that would be "state aid" by the somewhat less than enthusiastic West Sussex council representatives. the same ones happy to lob 100's of thousands of pounds of public money at BT tho.. as that is ok smile


In reply to a post by RadioJock:
Hi Bill and the guys at Vfast, sorry to muscle in again, but I think that the story below has relevance to GB.
I hope you are lobbying hard for a share of Gordo's cake.
Puzzle: why do Freedom4 users never post here?
Shock/horror - today's headline news about pathetic mobile B/band speeds!!


WIRELESS AND THE STIMULUS BILL: A TOUGH ROAD?

WiMAX and Wi-Fi Will Need to Educate to Grab a Piece of the Stimulus Pie

exchange
Tara Seals 09/06/09


Bill Lewis - MD
Kijoma Broadband - (Division of Kijoma Solutions Ltd)
High Speed Wireless broadband ISP
The UK's top rated Wireless ISP 2005 - 2008 - ISP Review
Top 5 finalist in best UK wireless ISP - ISPA's 2008
Members of the Internet Service Providers association (www.ISPA.org.uk)
http://www.kijoma.net
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 18-Jun-09 11:24:18
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: kijoma] [link to this post]
 
So I was wrong about the contents of the Carter Report.

WiMax does get mentioned. However it is dissed! Existing Telco's & LTE are to be favoured.
WiMAX would be “un-competitive” and must not “de-stabilise the vital standardisation that underpins mobile roaming in the UK and abroad”

In the Glossary - “Worldwide Inter-operability for Microwave Access” must have stuck in his throat, so it has been interpreted for us.

Spectrum also features and curiously, despite the above comments, a separate auction of TDD 2.6GHz for WiMAX is promised “before the end of 2009”

Your comments noted Bill, shame our Government could not offer you & our rural communities summat' like this:-



ALVARION LANDS LARGEST US GOV'T-BACKED WiMAX DEAL

Unstrung
— Michelle Donegan, 17.06.09

Alvarion Ltd. announced a $100 million contract to supply U.S. WiMAX start-up Open Range Communications Inc. for the largest government-funded WiMAX deployment in the country.

The deal is significant not just because of its size, but also because it gives a taste of what's to come from the U.S. government's $7.2 billion broadband stimulus plan.

Open Range received a $267 million loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Utilities Service (RUS) in March 2008 to fund a WiMAX-deployment plan to cover 6 million people in under-served regions. In January this year, the start-up also received a $100 million investment from One Equity Partners , which is the private equity arm of JP.Morgan Chase .

Now, as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the USDA's RUS has $2.5 billion to spend on loans and loan guarantees for rural broadband projects like the one Open Range will launch this year. In addition to that, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) has another $4 billion to spend on broadband projects.

Alvarion implies that it is well placed to capture other WiMAX equipment supply deals that the government funding will undoubtedly unleash. The Israeli company says that in July 2008, it received not only acceptance from the USDA but also "Buy American" status from the RUS for two of its BreezeMAX base stations.

WiMAX in the boondocks
Open Range's plan is to deploy mobile WiMAX in 546 rural communities in 17 states, bringing service availability to 6 million people in the next five years. The operator aims to launch commercial services in the fourth quarter this year.

The operator will lease ancillary terrestrial component (ATC) spectrum from Globalstar Inc. According to an Alvarion spokesman, this spectrum is "very close" to Clearwire's 2.5-GHz spectrum, but noted that some customisation would be required.

For Alvarion's five-year $100 million contract, the WiMAX vendor will supply base stations as well as customer premises equipment and systems integration for the project.

While Alvarion is not part of the headline-hogging Clearwire network, it has won a fair share of U.S. WiMAX deals. Its U.S.

http://www.unstrung.com/document.asp?doc_id=178155&

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Sat 27-Jun-09 07:35:19
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
BIGGEST BARRIERS TO SEAMLESS MOBILE CONNECTIVITY

gigaohm

Stacey Higginbotham 24.06.09

Most technology vendors agree that multiple mobile networks create a lot of complexity for users trying to figure out how they should connect when Wi-Fi or 3G networks are available. Add WiMAX and LTE to the picture and things get even more complicated, according to Barbara Nelson, CTO of iPass.

Creating an easy user experience through seamless connectivity between networks and software can be done, but Nelson laid out several challenges to executing it. Most of them are related to business models rather than technical challenges, among them:

* Authentication Issues — Different networks decide if you can use their network based on different criteria. To access a Wi-Fi network you need a user name and password, but to get on a cellular network you need a SIM card, which is attached to a device. WiMAX certifies the device but then accepts a user name and password. Nelson believes associating connectivity with a user is ideal since users may own a great number of devices.

* Billing Model Issues — Users buy Wi-Fi connectivity based on a measure of time (such as a day pass) while cellular operators charge for access based on the number of megabytes of data a user downloads. For the user it may make sense to use a cellular network for checking email rather than paying for a Wi-Fi day pass, but it’s hard for a user to figure that out, especially since most users have no idea how to define a megabyte. Nelson also was frustrated by the variability in roaming charges when trying to get on 3G networks internationally.

* Policy Issues — Building a software client that can help users decide whether it’s best to choose a network with the lowest costs, fastest data rates or best signal strength for a task is hard. It requires the client to be able to figure out how strong a signal is and weigh that against how many users are on a network. For example a strong cellular signal is good, but if a lot of people are sharing that cell site, there’s too much congestion, which lowers the data throughput. So given a choice between that and weak Wi-Fi signal with faster data rates, a Wi-Fi network would be best. But the average user doesn’t want to think about this.

There are a host of issues that basically stem from trying to mesh the worlds of unlicensed spectrum dominated by Wi-Fi to the heavily controlled world of licensed spectrum owned by network operators. Nelson notes that these complications are keeping users who are worried about incurring costs or using the wrong network away from the web when they’re mobile. As she put it, “We’re building this global Internet, and users are scared to get on it.”

http://gigaom.com/2009/06/24/biggest-barriers-to-sea...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 01-Jul-09 06:45:24
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
ANALYSTS DOUBT FUTURE OF COMCAST'S WiMAX OFFERING

NewsFactor.com

Mark Long 30.06.09

Cable-TV network operator Comcast has launched a high-speed 4G wireless service in Portland over Clearwire's WiMAX infrastructure. Comcast expects the WiMAX service to go nationwide, but analysts say it's not competitive. The Clearwire WiMAX network Comcast is using only has two markets, and its 4G service is similar to 3G offerings.

Comcast launched a high-speed wireless Relevant Products/Services data Relevant Products/Services service in Portland on Tuesday as the first step in what the cable-TV network operator expects to eventually become a nation-wide rollout -- with Atlanta, Chicago and Philadelphia expected to go online later this year.

Called Comcast High-Speed 2go, the new 4G service will operate over Clearwire's WiMAX infrastructure in the Portland metropolitan area and elsewhere over Sprint Nextel's nation-wide 3G network. Comcast is a major investor in Clearwire, together with Bright House Networks, Google, Intel, Sprint and Time Warner Cable.

Comcast's high-speed wireless data service is being bundled with one or more of the network operator's Internet, phone and television products because "in today's world, consumers don't want to be disconnected for even a minute," said Comcast Senior Vice President Cathy Avgiris. "Now Comcast provides wired and wireless access -- a combination consumers won't want to live without."

An Uphill Battle

Though the move is a step in the right direction for WiMAX, the state of the fledgling high-speed wireless service "is pretty dire" -- not only in the U.S. but also anywhere else in the world, observed Gartner Vice President Ian Keene. A competing 4G standard called long-term evolution (LTE) is already on the horizon and the global recession has been holding back investment in WiMAX, Keene explained.

"Generally, where WiMAX is going to be successful is in developing countries where wireless broadband will essentially be a DSL replacement," Keene said. "But it's an uphill battle for WiMAX anywhere else with a developed infrastructure. The outcome will depend on just what is being offered and comes down to pricing and product marketing."

Comcast is delivering two separate High-Speed 2go offerings. The operator's 4G-only data card provides customers with the fastest available service within Clearwire's 4G service footprint, while the network operator's dual-band data card automatically switches users between metro 4G coverage and Sprint's coast-to-coast 3G network.

Comcast is providing current and future customers with the option of subscribing to a bundled Fast Pack for $49.99 per month that combines both its wireless and cable-based home Internet offerings. Moreover, the network operator's existing customers can receive the 4G wireless service as an add-on for as low as $30 per month, the company said.

Tough to Beat

Gartner Research Director Phil Redman isn't convinced that Comcast's new offerings will gain much in the way of wireless market traction, at least initially. "Right now there isn't enough coverage or capability to compete with 3G services," Redman said. "If you look at the main four areas -- speed, cost, coverage and devices -- Clearwire and Comcast lose out on all

"Clearwire is only offering speeds up to 1.5 and 2.0 Mbps, which is fairly similar to what the offer is from the 3G operators," Redman observed. "The 3G operators have nationwide coverage of over 250 million POPs, in over 100 markets," whereas "Clearwire is official in two markets."

Both Comcast and Clearwire offer basic service for $30 per month, which is a bit better than average 3G deals, Redman noted. "However, users can tether a 3G device for PC access for an additional $15, so no real advantage there," Redman said. "Finally, there are many more dongles, PC Cards, embedded PCs, and smartphones that are 3G."

"In the end, cellular operators already have the wired and wireless market share and will be tough to beat," Redman said. "I don't see how competitors without a vastly differentiated offering in one or more of the four areas I mentioned -- cost, coverage, speed, devices -- will survive."

http://www.newsfactor.com/story.xhtml?story_id=13200...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 01-Jul-09 22:39:24
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Who says its not appropriate for urban areas?

MAJOR WiMAX NETWORK STARTS IN JAPAN

TG Daily
01.07.09

A subsidiary of KDDI has started providing WiMAX fast wireless connectivity in Tokyo, Nagoya, Osaka, Kyoto and Kobe.

The broadband service offers download speeds of 40Mbps, a speed that compares favourably with ADSL and is many times faster than 3G, said nikkei.net.

The WiMAX service will cover all major Japanese cities during 2010, the report said.

The service costs $46 (4,480 yen) per month, a price which also compares favourably with data communications on cellular networks.

Unless a PC has integrated WiMAX capabilities, users will have to buy cards to use the service, but a large number of vendors are set to produce WiMAX ready notebooks during July.

http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/43057/145/

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 03-Jul-09 09:15:37
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WiMAX READY TO SURGE AGAIN

InformationWeek

W. David Gardner 02.07.09

The roaring deployment of WiMax equipment rollout is expected to pause for a few months, then take off again by the end of the year, according to a report from Infonetics Research.

The rapid growth of the wide-area technology has been slowed by the worldwide economic meltdown, but also appears to have been influenced by a simple need to re-organize after its earlier soaring growth, the market research firm said as it released its quarterly report on mobile infrastructure this week.

Go inside Xohm, Sprint Nextel's business unit for WiMax (which has recently combined with Clearwire) for an ambitious broadband build-out.
"Having grown at lung-busting speed for a couple of years, a slowdown and pause for breath for the WiMax equipment market probably would have been inevitable even without the recession," said Richard Webb, the firm's directing analyst for WiMax, microwave, and mobile devices, in a statement. "As it is, economic conditions are exacerbating the pause, with worldwide fixed and mobile WiMax equipment revenue down 16% from the previous quarter and further declines expected in the second quarter."

The WiMax equipment market is growing fastest in developing nations and particularly in Africa, but also in the Middle East, India, Europe, and Asia Pacific regions. In the United States the largest deployment is for Clearwire's infrastructure.

Infonetics indicated that Voice over Internet Protocol over WiMax technology is attracting many carriers and GSM operators also are installing the service because of its cost-effective delivery option.

A build-up of postponed shipments is expected to drive a new surge in WiMax orders, Infonetics said, noting that the service is gaining in developed countries, too, as evidenced by Japan's UQ and the Netherlands' WorldMax networks in addition to Clearwire in the United States.

Infonetics said Alvarion is the leading revenue generator followed by Alcatel-Lucent, Motorola , Huawei, Cisco and Samsung.

"Although WiMax service strategies differ from operator to operator and from market to market, most operators are focused on the less capital-intensive fixed and nomadic WiMax broadband services now to address under-served markets seeking 'wireless DSL,' said Webb. "Many have formalised plans to migrate to full mobility WiMax over the next couple of years."

http://tinyurl.com/kovaoh

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 06-Jul-09 10:21:30
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
3 IRELAND CHIEF NOT HOPEFUL FOR WiMAX

THE POST.IE

Adrian Weckler 05.07.09

The chief executive of 3 Ireland has dismissed the chances of WiMAX as a broadband platform for Irish internet users.

Speaking against the backdrop of the company surpassing 150,000mobile broadband customers, Robert Finnegan said that WiMAX would not challenge 3G broadband.

‘‘Gone are the days when WiMAX and Wi-Fi were seen as challengers,” said Finnegan.

‘‘Many of the world’s leading equipment manufacturers now acknowledge mobile broadband as the leading broadband technology and their global road-maps reflect this. These figures are real evidence of the success and continued demand for mobile [3G] broadband in Ireland.”

Two weeks ago, The Sunday Business Post revealed that the operator Imagine is due to launch a nation-wide WiMAX broadband service this autumn. It will be backed by Intel and a number of other multinationals.

The service will offer speeds of up to 40Mbs when it is fully rolled out. 3G broadband currently represents 15 per cent of the Irish broadband market, according to recent ComReg figures. O2 has 110,000 customers, while Vodafone’s last stated customer numbers were 106,000. A spokeswoman for Vodafone said that the company could not comment on whether its numbers had risen or fallen in recent months.

Meteor, which launched a 3G broadband service in March, has just over 10,000 customers. The newest entrant to the mobile broadband market, Eircom, has not yet released customer figures.

© Thomas Crosbie Media, 2009

http://tinyurl.com/pwebjp

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 09-Jul-09 11:01:41
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Rare news item from Blighty!

ALVARION AND MLL TELECOM BUILD UK MOBILE WiMAX TRIAL NETWORK FOR MOBILE WiMAX ACCELERATION GROUP (M-WAG)

Sourcewire
09.07.09

Network Used for Public Safety, CCTV and Enterprise Mobility Applications to demonstrate business case for Mobile WiMAX

Alvarion Ltd, the world’s leading provider of WiMAX and wireless broadband solutions, and MLL Telecom, Alvarion’s partner in the UK, today announced that the Mobile WiMAX network built for M-WAG has been used to test a wide variety of applications for consumer, business and local government market segments.

Established in 2007, M-WAG is a consortium of companies formed to create a WiMAX ecosystem in the UK to showcase the WiMAX business case in anticipation of Ofcom’s auction of the 2.6 GHz spectrum which is expected to take place during 2010.

The pilot network in Maidstone went live in July 2008 with the support of Maidstone Borough Council and has been used to trial a number of different applications such as mobile data, mobile VoIP and mobile video streaming.

An open day for those wishing to visit the network and talk to M-WAG members is scheduled to be held on Wednesday 22 July in Maidstone. More details are available on www.mwaguk.com.

MLL Telecom (an M-WAG member) was responsible for the design, integration and management of the WiMAX network and used Alvarion technology to deliver the service.

“The success of this trial shows the maturity of WiMAX technology,” said Eddie Minshull, CEO of MLL Telecom. “We have been proactively managing the network on a 24 x 7 basis and found it to be extremely stable. With the right sort of planning and design expertise WiMAX is now ready for mainstream use.”

Alvarion’s Mobile WiMAX BreezeMAX base stations have been positioned in the centre of Maidstone and communicate with different end-user devices including Alvarion Indoor CPEs (customer premise equipment), laptops equipped with Mobile WiMAX PCMCIA cards, USB Dongles and digital cameras and encoders.

Individual member companies of M-WAG are running a number of different trials over the network together with end users from various market segments:

Public safety trial:
EADS Defence and Security, together with Kent Fire and Rescue Service, tested the use of Mobile WiMAX for delivering real-time video between an incident scene, a mobile command unit and the Headquarters control room. The trial validated the use of real-time visual communications that can be set up on the go improve the decision making capability of a first-responder service.

CCTV trial:
Bluenowhere, a wholesale WiMAX network operator supporting local government applications, in conjunction with Maidstone Borough Council, demonstrated the capability of WiMAX to replace 3G and fixed CCTV connections in a cost effective manner to provide 24/7 IP-based video surveillance services on a fixed and mobile basis. Also piloted was the use of WiMAX to save costs in building inspection and for live data capture by the community safety team. (www.bluenowhere.net)

Mobile worker trial:
Bluenowhere worked with Maidstone Borough Council whose employees have also been using the network via, PCs with indoor modems and laptops with PC Cards and USB dongles, whilst out of the office. This has been so successful that they have insisted on using the dongles in the office instead the fixed connection.

The results of these trials will be documented in a comprehensive report by Mott MacDonald, an M-WAG member.

“As evident from our many commercial Mobile WiMAX deployments around the world, the technology is here and now ready in the UK as well,” said Zeev Strahl, regional director from Alvarion. “M-WAG has brought together several leading companies across the telecoms and media industries to build a state of the art Mobile WiMAX showcase in the UK. The results of these trials will show unique capabilities of WiMAX necessary for multiple market segments in UK.”

Kerl Haslam, Chairman of the Mobile WiMAX Acceleration Group, said: “The members of M-WAG have successfully shown the capability of WiMAX to deliver a range of applications in a number of different markets. Through the trials M-WAG has proved the business case for local government and business services.”

http://www.sourcewire.com/releases/rel_display.php?r...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 16-Jul-09 11:49:57
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
4G ECOSYSTEM DELIVERS NEW CAPABILITIES, DEVICES & PARTICIPANTS

WiMAX.com

Alan Weissberger 01.07.09

In this second article based on our series of interviews, Jose Puthenkulam, Director of WiMAX Standards at Intel provides his perspective on the evolving 4G ecosystem including user expectations, devices, mobile operators, spectrum, network infrastructure, business models, and new applications.

Mobile WiMAX & LTE: 3G networks evolving to 4G
To better understand the evolution of 3G to 4G networks, it is helpful to first examine them from a standards perspective. It may not be widely known that ITU-R M.1457 recommendation (AKA 3G -IMT 2000 Release 1) - includes both IEEE 802.16e-2005 ("Mobile WiMAX") and the 3GPP LTE Release 8. In fact, many of the core 4G ingredients are already in those standards: OFDMA, flat- all IP- network, fixed or mobile operation, MIMO, hybrid ARQ (automatic repeat request) at the PHY layer, multi-megabit speeds delivered to users, advanced FEC, etc. Incremental improvements are also being made to the evolving IEEE 802.16m and LTE Advanced standards in order to align them with the 4G requirements specified in the ITU-R IMT-Advanced recommendation (which has yet to be finalized and numbered).

The upshot of all this is that both Mobile WiMAX and LTE are officially designated 3G technologies, which are evolving to 4G in their respective standards bodies (IEEE 802.16 and 3GPP). The race to 4G has been accelerated by a number of factors; the early deployment of Mobile WiMAX is one of the most important.

4G User Expectations and Network Capabilities
Users want a "seamless connectivity" experience for mobile Internet access. They want to be able to easily access well-known Internet brands (e.g. Google, Yahoo, MSN, Amazon, Facebook, etc) from whatever notebook PC or device they are using at the time. That device could be a netbook, smart phone, MID, or other gadget. Users expect seamless hand-over between base stations, roaming between carriers, and no dropped calls or Internet session. And they want speed too- at least 2 to 5 M bit/sec average data rate over a mobile broadband network.

4G will mark a huge transition from circuit switched voice and TDM wireless transmission to an all IP packet switched network and VoIP. To a very large extent, that has already happened in fixed line networks (DSL, cable, or wireless), where VoIP is available over a broadband network from many different service providers. Puthenkulam expects VoIP over WiMAX handsets to be available from Clearwire in 2010 and VoIP over LTE to be available by 2012 (presumably from VZW and Vodafone).

4G mobile network technical capabilities must be in place to support user expectations and requirements. These include: a flat (non-hierarchical) all IP network, MIMO on uplink and downlink, spatial multiplexing with transmit diversity, schemes to minimize packet loss (e.g. advanced FEC and ARQ), robustness (high availability), reliability, and excellent security.


4G Devices and Network "Stress Testing"
While smart phones are arguably viewed as the driver for 4G networks, it will actually be notebooks (and possibly netbooks) that will stress test those networks. Smart phones will work much better on a 4G network (higher speeds and lower latency) - they don't have enough storage capacity to send and receive large amounts of data or video so they won't sufficiently impact network capacity. Imagine emails exchanged with tens of Megabytes of attachments. While this is routine using a notebook PC, it would be painfully slow on a smart phone.

Within any given geographical area, the 4G network must serve many users at high speeds, high throughput, and low latency. The network must not crash if all potential mobile data users were to access the network at the same time (Note: this often happens with WiFi used in conference rooms or at conventions). Network capacity and planning for 4G must consider clusters of "heavy duty users" sending large volumes of data. Multiple concurrent PC users -downloading or uploading large video files or presentations - could potentially break the network. So 4G network capacity must be matched and scaled against this multi-megabit file transfer scenario, with several interleaved real time applications (e.g. voice or video conferencing) that are tested for low latency.

In the future, Puthenkulam believes that the mobile Internet will be the prime application of smart phones, rather than voice. He believes one of the reasons for this is the richness of alternative communication media like Email, Twitter, Facebook etc. Music streaming will also become more popular in his view. Internet radio will overtake satellite radio in a 4G world (this author strongly disagrees). Personal casting1 via media servers and social networks (like Twitter or You Tube) will be an important capability of 4G smart phones and all-in-one devices.

Vehicle entertainment systems and devices have a lot of potential in Puthenkulam's opinion. In one scenario, you could use a handheld device credential to authenticate a "4G terminal" in a car. Once authenticated, that 4G terminal could provide a variety of services and applications - from emergency road service with automatic location ID to music streaming to portable on-line gaming applications (presumably for kids sitting in the back seat of the car, rather than the driver).

Smart sensors and meters for infrastructure applications, such as smart grids, could be very effective in a 4G network. They could monitor how much energy was used in the home or office and optimize energy use by controlling a thermostat or other appliances. Home solar cells could also be connected through a 4G enabled smart grid. Other innovative machine-to-machine (M2M) devices and applications are possible using a 4G network. An automated parking attendant that can keep tabs on empty parking spaces and time stamp those that are occupied is one example. Child monitoring systems in a day care center is another. Various forms of web server-to- web server communications capabilities for mobile commerce are also a possibility

Editor's Note: Mobile e-business was envisioned to be a big application for web services in 2003, but six years later, it still hasn't happened yet.

The Evolving 4G Operator Ecosystem, Spectrum, and Network Infrastructure
Both Mobile WiMAX and LTE have similar capabilities from an operator service and end user standpoint. To upgrade to either (from 2.5G or 3G) will require a new Radio Access Network (RAN), which will be about 90% -to-95% of CAPEX. The other 5%-to-10% of CAPEX will be in Core IP Network Equipment

Editor's Note: The incumbent cellcos are almost all planning for LTE, while the majority of Greenfield operators have chosen Mobile WiMAX.

A key question is how expensive will the 4G network equipment and devices be? Mobile WiMAX has already gone through two cycles of cost reduction in terms of chip sets and base stations. LTE has not yet been deployed, so is already behind Mobile WiMAX in the cost reduction cycle. Puthenkulam believes that this gives WiMAX a big advantage over LTE.

The duplexing method (for simultaneous transmission between the base station and subscriber unit) is a very important issue when considering spectrum utilization. The "cellular industry at large" has to support a set of FDD legacy networks, including GPRS, EDGE, GSM, CDMA, and CDM2000. So when cellular operators turn on LTE service, it will need to inter-work and be compatible with those networks, implying that the initial LTE deployments will be based on FDD. China Mobile is an exception, having already deployed a TDD network (TDS-CDMA), they are planning on a TDD version of LTE.

Most Mobile WiMAX deployments use TDD, which is much more bandwidth efficient than FDD. It uses half of the FDD spectrum, which requires separate frequency channels for upstream and downstream directions of transmission and is typically offered as a pair of channels, as depicted in the Figures.

FDD can be quite inefficient (waste bandwidth) in a given direction of transmission, usually upstream, when carrying asymmetric data services. This is because the actual data traffic may occupy only a small portion of the upstream channel bandwidth at any given time. Mobile WiMAX traffic will be dominated by asymmetric data (e.g. much higher downlink than uplink traffic), so TDD is a better choice.

TDD uses only one channel for transmitting downlink and uplink sub-frames via two distinct time slots within a single frequency channel. TDD therefore has higher spectral efficiency than FDD. Moreover, using TDD downlink to uplink (DL/UL) ratio can be adjusted dynamically.

Because most Mobile WiMAX operators are not cellcos, they don't have to be backward compatible with a 2G or 3G FDD network (Sprint as a WiMAX MVNO is an exception). So they instantly realize a savings in licensed spectrum, which is a very scarce and expensive resource. As a result, they are able to provide the most spectrally efficient technology that is available on the market now.

Fixed line Operators will move to deploy 4G networks
Let's look at fixed broadband (DSL or cable) network operators that want to be 4G network providers. BT, Comcast, Tata Communications, and BSNL (India government operator) come to mind. To offer a quad play service bundle, those operators need a broadband wireless/mobile network. They can either build it themselves or lease capacity and become a MVNO.

Puthenkulam firmly believes that Mobile WiMAX is a better choice than LTE for those fixed broadband operators, because it is a "native broadband wireless technology." By deploying a single infrastructure, they are able to provide mobile service as well as a variety of fixed line services, e.g. VoIP and entertainment video.

On the other hand, LTE (for most operators) needs to be backward compatible with the TDM based 3G network infrastructure, which is not well suited to carrying broadband data. It's not just the Radio Access Network (RAN), according to Puthenkulam. The core infrastructure must be substantially upgraded, with higher capacity routers. So a fixed broadband operator choosing Mobile WiMAX is "one-up" on the cellular operator choosing LTE. Comcast, Time Warner and Brighthouse investment and partnership with Clearwire is a perfect example of this strategy. Comcast has just announced it will provide mobile WiMAX service and laptop cards in Portland, OR, as a Clearwire MVNO. More cities are scheduled for roll-out later this year, tracking CLEAR deployments.

While it hasn't happened yet, Puthenkulam believes that these same fixed broadband operators can migrate from the flat rate VoIP calling plans they have now (e.g. Comcast) to mobile VoIP, which he thinks will be a lot cheaper than traditional mobile voice service. Puthenkulam makes the following bold prediction: "Network operators that know how to deliver mobile VoIP - in the most efficient way and with roaming- will thrive and attract a lot of subscribers. Mobile VoIP will rewrite voice calling as we know it."

Puthenkulam observes that many cellular operators have not completed their 3G roll-outs yet. This is especially true in emerging markets, where he thinks operators should skip 3G entirely (it's too expensive and inefficient of bandwidth) and go directly to 4G. Mobile data will be the biggest growth engine for the next three to five years and 3G networks won't be able to support the explosion in mobile data traffic that we are already observing.

Editor's Note: This has already been a well-documented problem for AT&T in supporting iPhone traffic over its HSPA based 3G network. For example, AT&T does not allow iPhone tethering (use as an external 3G modem for notebooks) and completely blocks Sling Media video traffic on its mobile network.

Mobile WiMAX doesn't have the constraints of 3G, which is essentially a packet overlay (HSPA or EVDO) to a TDM network. Mobile WiMAX is more spectrum efficient (with OFDMA, MIMO and TDD) than 3G networks. And through the efforts of the Open Patent Alliance (OPA), the intellectual property licensing costs for Mobile WiMAX will be significantly less than for 3G technologies (especially CDMA based).

The upshot is that network operators moving directly from 2G or 2.5G to Mobile WiMAX (802.16e now; 802.16m later) makes a lot of sense to Puthenkulam. Nonetheless, Intel will soon be able to provide 3G-HSPA modem technology for mobile computing devices, based on a licensing deal with Nokia announced June 23rd by Intel's Ultra mobility Group (which is responsible for MIDs and Smart Phones). It will enable Intel to have a more complete wireless technology solution portfolio, according to Puthenkulam.

Managing Network Capacity: Wireless Backhaul and Reduced OPEX
Mobile WiMAX is well positioned to use wireless backhaul to reduce OPEX costs over wire-line backhaul. We've seen Dragonwave capitalize on this trend by using micro-wave radio to backhaul WiMAX network traffic.

In the end to end reference architecture defined by the WiMAX Forum NWG, network traffic from several base stations are aggregated to a single backhaul point by the Access Service Network (ASN) Gateway. The ASN Gateway backhauls the aggregated traffic to the broadband service provider, ISP, or MVNO core IP network (depending on who owns the backbone network).

By aggregating capacity at a smaller number of backhaul points, the business model can be more flexible, including the offering of un-metered, flat rate billing plans. Puthenkulam believes that metering traffic will only impact very high bandwidth WiMAX users.

In particular, the WiMAX Forum end-to-end reference architecture supports sharing of the network in a variety of ways and business models:
- Network Access Provider (NAP) owns and operates the network.
- Network Service Provider (NSP) owns the subscriber and provides service.
- NSP shares the NAP or a NSP uses multiple NAPs.
- Application Service Provider (ASP) provides application services.

According to Puthenkulam, the WiMAX Core IP network2 consists of "off the shelf" IP network building blocks with specifications based on IETF RFC's, e.g. IP routers, Authentication Servers, OSS, BSS, mobile IP home agents, etc. While WiMAX does not require any specific core IP network, 3G and LTE require specific core network building blocks that are specified by the 3GPP. In particular, LTE uses an "Evolved Packet Core," for managing network traffic. Dedicated 3GPP defined Network Elements are used here, rather than generic IP network equipment.

Media Ecosystem is Evolving
As people grow tired of channel surfing their TVs to watch programs and movies, technology is providing new opportunities on when, where and how people view content. Consumers are now taking advantage of You Tube™, Hulu.com and other sites to watch web based streaming video and audio. In addition, there's more use of DVRs and VoD to watch favorite TV shows, news and movies.

By now, we're all familiar with this time shifting theme. But now it's being combined with place shifting (e.g. watching video on notebook PCs or smart phones via Sling box). We are now entering the era of "media personalization," where you can watch whatever you want when you want it and wherever you are. The key driver that will make this happen is mobile broadband access, especially 4G networks. Of course, we'll need roaming and hand-offs between mobile networks to make it a reality, but it's coming. In this vision of the future, almost every type of media will be delivered over IP. There will be very few exceptions. There's a huge demographic change that favors web content, delivered over 4G networks, to notebooks, netbooks, and mobile computing devices. Puthenkulam says that all user devices will have 4G-network access and be able to watch good quality video.

Editors Note: There is a difference of opinion as to how mobile video should be delivered to cell phones and other hand held devices. Some favor using a separate, dedicated network for broadcast video- like Qualcomm's Media Flow. Others favor using the existing cellular network to watch video on devices, like the software download from MobiTV. AT&T has currently chosen to block Sling box transmitted video over its 3G cellular network. This may all change when 4G networks get deployed. Let's see.

4G Business Models Favor More Services Delivered at Lower Cost (than 3G)
With a flat- all IP network, all information flows over the same Network layer protocol (IP). Therefore, the network operator will be able to offer the user a "pay for what you use" pricing model that will be a powerful motivator to develop and sell new services. In this scenario, broadband Internet access will be standard and there will be small, incremental prices for additional services, like VoIP or mobile real time video. This will be a powerful motivator for innovation. It will very likely stimulate application software developers to create new and useful applications, which will broaden the market even more. This will attract new users and drive costs down due to economies of scale. Some of the new services and applications include: home security and power monitoring, child-care center monitoring, telemedicine and health check-ups. Certainly, there will be many more that we haven't thought of yet.

There will also be radio technology innovation that far outpaces 3G. This is clearly evident in MIMO and beam forming that has been included in Mobile WiMAX Wave 2 products (see the first article in this series for an explanation).

Closing Thoughts from a 4G Visionary
- IEEE 802.16 and Mobile WiMAX technologies have all the capabilities to serve the broadband mobile Internet operators and users.

- The fusion of different services that will be delivered over "all IP" 4G networks will enable operators and application developers to custom tailor what you get to the device that you have.

- End users will benefit immensely from the applications that are spawned by the availability of 4G mobile networks. Global change will be brought about through mobile Internet based communications.

- Jose Puthenkulam firmly believes that 4G networks will be affordable and will empower the people that use it. We certainly hope he is right.

Disclaimer: The views and opinions in this article are those of Jose Puthenkulam and not those of his employer - Intel Corp. Please refer to Intel's web site or contact their PR department for the company position on the topics discussed. In addition, please see the first article in this series for the genesis of WiMAX standards.

________________________________
(1) - Sending small messages, which are broadcast to the people following the sender. This is how Twitter and other social networking tracking sites work.

(2) - This author believes Cisco's primary WiMAX initiative is to sell "Greenfield" network operators a complete "Core IP NGN" system, which may or may not include WiMAX RAN equipment.

http://tinyurl.com/kneew2

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 16-Jul-09 12:30:49
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
AT YOTA, CREATIVITY RULES IN MOBILE BROADBAND

WiMAX.com

Monica Paolini 06.07.09

Increasingly, WiMAX operators in emerging markets are moving away from duplicating models that dominate in developed countries to create truly innovative models that are based on the specific dynamics of the markets where they operate.

Yota is one of the best examples of this. I met them in February and I found them amazing, but at the same time I was a bit suspicious. Could they really pull it off? Well, a few months later, they appear to be moving in the right direction and if anything they are doing better than I expected. True, having deep pockets helps, but that does not guarantee innovation, and in some cases it may stifle it.

So what's special about Yota? They are one of the many WiMAX operators in Russia, but they are the ones with the strongest focus on mobility. They have 2.5 GHz spectrum and $470 millions funding. Since their launch in June 2008, they have signed up 76,000 customers and claim to sign up 1,300 new subscribers a day (suggesting that demand has started to pick up lately).

Of their 850 employees, 200 develop software, because Yota sees itself as a content and application provider as well. The service offered includes voice and a subscription to video and music content, and it has been all tightly integrated since the very beginning. They are working with major content providers, like EMI, Sony, Universal, and Warner. All the services they offer are on based on unlimited use to make the service simple and attractive to subscribers. With the all-you-can-eat plan at $16/month, it will be challenging for Yota to offer all this and become profitable, but they may be able to generate the volumes needed. It is a big gamble though.

Yota has been the first operator to launch a WiMAX and cellular phone. The proposition they offer to their subscribers is very simple: they can choose the cellular operator they want and they are in charge of managing their contract with the operator as they wish. In most cases, this probably means that the subscribers simply move their existing SIM card from their old handset to the new one. The phone works like a regular cell phone where there is no WiMAX coverage. In WiMAX areas, subscribers can receive calls to their cellular number and their VoIP line, and can decide whether to place a call through the VoIP or cellular line. This leaves maximum freedom to the subscribers and removes the need for Yota to establish a partnership with one or more cellular operators. As a result, the WiMAX phone was introduced in the market right away, since lengthy negotiation with cellular providers could be skipped. More importantly, this approach provides subscribers with a device that combines good coverage (in cellular-only areas) with good throughput and lower cost services where WiMAX is available.

The phone is quite expensive at over $1,000, but not much more expensive than other smartphones, but that does not stop subscribers from buying it. In February, the company said that 20% of their subscribers had a phone. That's quite a high percentage given the cost of the phone and the fact that the core WiMAX services typically appeal to the laptop users.

More devices have been announced, including a mass-market phone and a middle-range Android phone. It will be interesting to follow the evolution of their service.

Along with its subscriber numbers, Yota disclosed some interesting data on their subscribers' usage profiles. Within three months, the operator has noticed a rapid shift towards mobility. Subscribers quickly discover on their own the value of mobility and gradually expand the area where they use the service. This is not a surprising trend, but it is remarkable how fast the process is-a month or two. Clearwire has observed the same phenomenon in Portland and within a comparable timeframe. (See article for pie charts).

The scary part comes with the traffic generated by subscribers. Excluding idle and abusive users, the average traffic generated by a Yota subscriber is 10.3 GB per month. This is 20% over Russian DSL subscribers and 100% than 2G/3G data users. Yota subscribers are early adopters who are well versed in all sorts of traffic-intensive applications and are typically heavy users of video applications. The increased availability (compared to DSL) and speed (compared to 3G) of the connection contribute to explain the higher traffic levels for WiMAX. But this does not change the fact that that traffic levels are growing very fast and that WiMAX operators are likely to be the first to see the full extent of the increase in traffic because they have more capacity per subscriber in their networks.

The trend towards high traffic levels is confirmed by other operators as well, even though the numbers I have seen are not this extreme. While these usage levels confirm that subscribers value the service, they spell trouble for the operator. No matter how spectrally efficient technologies like WiMAX, HSPA and LTE are, all wireless operators are bound by limited spectrum (and funding) resources. Eventually operators will have to start face congestion issues. High traffic levels will push operators to operate differently. They will have to use more sophisticated techniques to manage traffic over their networks and they will have to plan their network with an architecture that relies more on pico and femtocells that increase the overall network capacity. The days when the brute-force approach of just adding more macro cells where needed was sufficient to keep subscribers happy are forever gone.

Monica Paolini is the founder and president of Senza Fili Consulting.

http://www.wimax.com/commentary/blog/blog-2009/july-...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 22-Jul-09 08:36:00
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
CLEARWIRE WiMAX DRIVER FOR MAC DUE NEXT MONTH

CIO ITDrilldown Mobile

By Stephen Lawson 21.07.09

IDG News Service — Clearwire next month, will finally introduce client software for linking Apple Macintosh laptops directly to its WiMax service, as well as introducing a dual-mode USB modem for WiMax and Sprint Nextel's 3G network.

The would-be national WiMax carrier offers tabletop and USB modems, and in April it introduced the Clear Spot standalone modem with built-in Wi-Fi. But so far, it has only provided Windows drivers, so Mac users have not been able to use the Clear service directly, though they can hook up via Wi-Fi through the US$139.99 Clear Spot. On Aug. 17, Clearwire will begin offering a Mac driver as a free download for customers, according to Mike Sievert, chief commercial officer.

Clearwire doesn't offer a driver for Linux devices to use its modems, but someday the company will offer open-source code for outside developers to write their own drivers, according to CTO John Saw.

On Aug. 1, Clear will start selling the Clear 4G+ modem, a USB device that can connect users' laptops to WiMax service where available and to Sprint Nextel's 3G EV-DO (Evolution-Data Optimized) network in other areas. It is the company's first major step to overcome its limited national coverage area. The device will cost $79.99 after an instant rebate. A service plan including WiMax and Sprint 3G service will be available for $80 per month with a two-year contract. The dual-mode service will be available for Macs in the fourth quarter.

Clearwire announced the upcoming products as it launched commercial WiMax service in Las Vegas, its fourth major market. The Las Vegas network covers 638 square miles of the city's metropolitan area and reaches 1.7 million potential customers, according to Clearwire. It joins Baltimore, Atlanta and Portland, Oregon. Clearwire will turn on WiMax in other cities, including Chicago, Philadelphia and Dallas, before the end of the year, as well as convert from its older proprietary wireless system in markets including Seattle and Hawaii. The carrier plans to serve 80 markets with 120 million people by the end of next year.

The Clear WiMax service delivers 3Mb per second (Mbps) to 6Mbps, with bursts as high as 10Mbps, according to Clearwire. It starts at $20 per month for home and $30 per month for mobile service, and combined plans are also available. A day pass costs $10.

August will also see the release of one of the first handheld devices equipped for use on the Clear network, Samsung's Mondi, according to Clearwire. Samsung unveiled the MID (mobile Internet device) in April and said it would be available from Clearwire in the second quarter. The device runs Windows Mobile 6.1 and features Wi-Fi and a slide-out QWERTY keyboard. Pricing was not provided.

The Clear service and devices are sold online, at Clear stores and at select retail stores. They are available at six Best Buy and 24 RadioShack stores in the Las Vegas area, Clearwire said. The ultimate vision is to have most client devices sold through retail stores instead of Clearwire.

http://www.cio.com/article/497765/Clearwire_WiMax_Dr...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 22-Jul-09 11:48:35
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WiMAX MOVES FORWARD IN TAIWAN

WiMAX.com
19.07.09

Taiwan is a country to watch carefully in assessing the early success and commercial viability of Mobile WiMAX deployments. Executive Briefing on Current Status, Innovative Applications and Future Deployments.

Introduction

The Taiwan government has already invested more than $220M in WiMAX1 and has heavily promoted the technology for "next-generation" mobile Internet access. In 2007, the first WiMAX Forum Applications lab was opened on the island nation. And in April 2008, the Taiwan Ministry of Economic Affairs and Intel-Taiwan signed a memorandum of understanding to jointly accelerate the commercial deployment of WiMAX in Taiwan. But a lot more has happened since then.

In a highly anticipated presentation last week, Dr. Ching-Tarng Hsieh - Engineering Director at ITRI and Head the WiMAX Forum Taiwan office - described the current and forthcoming WiMAX deployments in Taiwan along with several unique applications being trialed. Dr. Hsieh spoke to an audience of approximately 40 engineers and scientists at a July 13th meeting at ITRI International Inc., San Jose, CA. ITRI, NATEA, and IEEE ComSoc -SCV jointly sponsored Dr. Hsieh's well received talk.

Ching-Tarng also briefed attendees on WiMAX deployments in other countries, including Japan, Malaysia, Russia, and the U.S. According to the WiMAX Forum, there are currently 475 WiMAX deployments in 140 countries providing fixed and mobile WiMAX services.

A strong case was made that broadband penetration can significantly increase a country's GDP (one surmises this was a main motivator for the Taiwan government to invest so heavily in WiMAX). In addition, WiMAX availability stimulates the design and development of innovative new devices and applications, which further contribute to economic growth. At the CES- 2009, Sony CEO Howard Stringer stated, "By 2011, 90 percent of Sony products will connect to the Internet and to each other."

The creation of a complete WiMAX ecosystem is expected to enhance the global competitiveness of Taiwan originated WiMAX offerings through greater interoperability with the WiMAX infrastructure in other parts of the world. Indeed, Taiwanese PC and CPE manufacturers are already a leading exporter of WiMAX products to many countries. And the growth of the domestic Taiwan WiMAX market will likely re-enforce this trend.

WiMAX in Taiwan - a Complete Package

Two of the six WiMAX Forum certification labs in the world are in Taiwan. Certification is needed to ensure interoperability of WiMAX base stations, subscriber stations, CPE, and mobile devices. A March 2009 the WMF NOTF Low Cost Device Survey found that 89% of global network operators will require certification of WiMAX equipment and terminals. To corroborate this point, Takashi Tanaka, President, UQ Communications (Japan) recently stated: "A variety of WiMAX Forum Certified end products are indispensable for UQ pursuing the retail distribution business model."

MTWAL is the first WiMAX Forum Applications Lab (M-Taiwan WiMAX Applications Lab). It was established by ITRI with support from WiMAX service provider VMAX Telecom. The objective of the Applications lab was to provide a platform for developing innovative WiMAX applications. It is currently an important ITRI attraction that is frequented by many international and domestic visitors.

ITRI-Taiwan is conducting a trial of WiMAX technology on a high- speed train (maximum speed of 300 Km/hour)2 . Maintaining broadband connectivity during rapid motion is a super challenge in itself, but it's complicated by the fact that the high-speed train often goes through tunnels, which effectively block radio waves.

Taiwan was said to have a "Complete WiMAX Ecosystem" -" in collaboration with leading international companies. The ecosystem includes: IC/Modules, CPE, Femto /Pico/Micro Base Stations (BS), Carrier-Grade BS/Software System, Testing and Certification, SI and Content Providers, and WiMAX Network Operators/ Service Providers. The ecosystem is listed in the graphic below: (View Link)

Ongoing WiMAX Projects and Future Events in Taipei

Some of the recent WiMAX projects and upcoming events in Taiwan include:

o Roaming trial: ITRI is conducting roaming testing with Tatung University in
cooperation with Aicent. Domestic operators will soon be invited to participate in the trial. In addition, Taiwan will participate in the WiMAX Forum Global Roaming trial.

o WiMAX on Taipei MRT (Municipal Rapid Transit): ITRI teamed up with VMAX Telecom, Acer, AWB, MSI, Tecom and ZyXEL, PTS, Taipei Zoo, and the Taipei City Government to offer WiMAX service on designated subway trains. This is a one-year project on the Muzha Line. VMAX Telecom installed 13 WiMAX base stations to facilitate the WiMAX service to each train. WiFi is used for wireless connectivity between the passenger and the WiFi AP within the train. Then WiMAX is used to backhaul the WiFi traffic to the ISP. The project has and will continue to demonstrate instant mobile and high quality media entertainment available to subscribers in motion.

o WiMAX Forum member conference and MTWAL open house in Taipei in
October 2009

o VTC2010-Spring in Taipei May 16-19, 2010 (www.vtc2010spring.org)


WiMAX Deployment in Taiwan- It's Happening Now

The WiMAX development in Taiwan reached an important milestone with the first commercial service deployment earlier this year. On April 27, 2009, Tatung InfoComm formally launched WiMAX services on Penghu, Taiwan's largest outlying island with 21 base stations providing coverage. Several promotions were offered to entice Penghu's 93,000 residents to sign up for the new broadband wireless Internet service. On July 8, 2009, Tatung InfoComm launched WiMAX service in Kaohsiung with 200 base stations. The service is cheaper than ADSL, but offers 3 to 4 times the speed along with mobility.

Tatung has a very aggressive schedule for WiMAX deployments in the 2008~2012 time period (3000+ Base Transceiver Stations or BTS's):
- 2008-2010 Covering 90% population major cities
- 2009-2011 Over 70% population major counties
- 2010-2012 Optimized full coverage

In addition, Tatung Infocomm plans many innovative applications and services for its WiMAX offerings. These include Location Based Services, remote home care, mobile office with VoIP, mobile tour guide, and mobile security. In addition, the service provider has an impressive roadmap for WiMAX devices:
- 2009-USB Dongle, Indoor CPE, Outdoor CPE
- 2010-Embedded netbook, WiMAX MID, Dual mode phone
- 2011-PDA, PSP, Digital Camera, Navigator, etc.

But that's just the beginning…..

CTV - the largest TV network in Taiwan- currently uses a WiMAX network to distribute video news clips to the TV stations.
By the end of 2009, WiMAX service will be available from six different network operators: Fitel, VMAX Telecom, Vee Telecom Multimedia, Far Eastone, Global Mobile, and Tatung InfoComm. For spectrum license purposes, the main island of Taiwan is divided into North and South zones. By the end of 2012, it is expected that WiMAX operators will cover the entire island nation of 22.9M people. (See Link to view map of the island).

VMAX Telecom has very impressive plans for WiMAX deployment. The operator will launch commercial service by Q3/2009 in Taipei City or Hsinchu County. They plan to have 20% coverage by Q3/2009, 50% by Q1/2010, and 85% by Q4/2010. VMAX is partnering with ASUS, Tecom and Intel to realize their WiMAX deployment schedule. Data, voice, and value added services (TBD) will be offered to subscribers. Subscribers will be able to buy WiMAX CPE from retail stores, key account partners, and 3C chain stores. As previously noted, VMAX is working with ITRI in support of a one year project to provide WiMAX service on the Taipei MRT Muzha/Neihu Line.

Questions and Open Issues

From the discussion during and after the presentation, several critical issues were identified for WiMAX to be successful in Taiwan (and probably other countries as well):

- Roaming between WiMAX network operators- when will it be operational?
- Interoperability and handoff between Mobile WiMAX and 3G/GSM networks - both for data and voice? Which 2G/3G networks should a WiMAX phone also support (in addition to VoIP over WiMAX)?
- Sufficient backhaul capacity?
- VoIP over WiMAX interoperability and roaming- will it be just Skype service or a provider based VoIP service that ensures a minimum QOS?
Choice of different handheld devices with embedded WiMAX radios/interfaces, e.g. cameras, MIDs, Sony gadgets, smart phones, other?
- Availability of WiFi APs with embedded WiMAX radios/interfaces

Conclusions

The successful deployment of WiMAX will make industry in Taiwan even more competitive and enhance the quality of life for subscribers. At three to four times the speed of DSL (plus mobility), the service will be very attractively priced. But the WiMAX activities in this island nation have even more global significance. Interoperability testing, applications and research lab results will strongly contribute to the progress of the global WiMAX ecosystem. An open and thriving WiMAX market in Taiwan will help device and equipment vendors, as well as companies that develop applications for WiMAX notebooks, netbooks and other terminals. We find it very encouraging that notebook PC leaders Acer and Asus-Tech are providing WiMAX CPE along with D-Link. We are impressed with the devices that Tatung Infocomm (and other Taiwan WiMAX operators) are planning to offer subscribers, through either partners or retail sales channels. Good luck Taiwan!

Postscript from the Speaker

In response to a wimax360 member comment questioning the vibrancy and sustainability of WiMAX in Taiwan, Dr. Ching-Tarng Hsieh wrote:

"Taiwan's ICT industry is not a "low-cost PCB assembly centric service economy." Taiwan has been dominating the world in the design and production of many ICT products. The WiMAX Forum depends on Taiwan to come up with a wide variety of economical WiMAX products. Taiwan's WiMAX industry has exported base stations and a large quantity of WiMAX CPEs. In 2008, Taiwan vendors collectively held a dominant global market share of WiMAX CPEs. The increased shipments in 20093 indicate this trend is continuing. This is the real impact of Taiwan's WiMAX industry."

Best regards,
Ching-Tarng Hsieh, PhD

http://www.wimax.com/commentary/blog/blog-2009/july-...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 30-Jul-09 16:55:07
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WITH WiMAX, WALKING ON THE WIRELESS SIDE IN BALTIMORE

NYTimes.com

By Peter Wayner 29.07.09

Baltimore, home of the hapless Orioles and a favourite backdrop for realistic TV crime dramas, just happens to be one of the most wired cities in the country. It ascended to the throne after Clearwire introduced WiMAX service last winter, giving the city a preview of what the company is slowly building throughout the country.

Calling the city “wired” is not quite accurate because, HBO series aside, WiMAX has little to do with copper; it delivers the Internet through radio signals broadcast from cellphone towers. The service is much faster, though, than what many cellphone networks currently provide with their 3G networks. Indeed, WiMAX delivers speeds much faster than many DSL circuits, rivalling many cable modems. I often clock downloads at 6 megabits per second (equivalent to basic cable service in many areas) and uploads at faster than 1 megabit per second.

Sprint, one of the owners of Clearwire, calls WiMAX a “4G network” to distinguish it from the 3G networks that connect smart-phones and offer speeds from 0.4 to 1 megabit per second. To make matters a bit more confusing, Clearwire sells “pre-WiMAX” service in 47 cities at speeds that top out at 2 megabits per second. In an effort to clarify the matter, Clearwire is using the brand name “Clear” to apply to full WiMAX service.

For the last six months, I’ve used a full WiMAX/4G equipped netbook to test the service around Baltimore. The Acer Aspire One with a Sprint U300 WiMAX card I used is an ideal companion for sending and receiving e-mail messages. It’s small enough to take almost everywhere but it’s large enough to act like a PC — a PC that’s always connected to a very big Wi-Fi hotspot.

Adding WiMAX to a laptop may make it easier to read e-mail messages often, but the real value of the bandwidth becomes apparent when the PC does something more than just send text. VoIP software like Skype turns it into a video phone, a browser pointed at Hulu acts like a television that can fetch shows on command and there’s also GPS service for finding directions. It’s a smart-phone with a normal keyboard and a very open software marketplace. All of the PC software built for the desktop also works with the small package.

The U300 attaches to any laptop, but Netbook manufacturers are offering more and more machines with built-in cards. Lenovo, for instance, will add the WiMAX/Wi-Fi Link 5150 card to some of their laptops for an additional $30. Prices vary depending on the model.

WiMAX is also one of the first wireless services that’s being actively marketed to people sitting on their couches at home. Xohm, the brand name originally given to Baltimore’s WiMAX service (it’s now being merged into Clearwire and the Xohm brand will disappear), sells a home base station meant to compete directly with DSL or cable for $35 a month, and sometimes there is a short-term discount. A base station and a laptop card together cost $50 a month. The service options are getting complicated and the prices vary in different communities. Comcast, another investor in Clearwire, is starting a wireless service in Portland, Ore., under its own brand name. It will charge $50 a month for service within Portland that is promised to deliver downloads at a rate of 4 megabits per second.

Sprint also sells a card that offers both 4G service where WiMAX is available and 3G service where Sprint’s cellphone network is all that’s there. It’s a better choice for anyone who travels outside of the cities where WiMAX is appearing. Sprint charges $80 for the modem and $80 a month for the service.

The WiMAX coverage in Baltimore is good but far from comprehensive. The signal blankets downtown and many of the neighbourhoods, but it stops just a few blocks from my house. The cellphone tower is on one side of the hill and my house is on the other. Clearwire says that it is slowly expanding coverage but I’ve seen little change in the map over the last few months.

WiMAX can also suffer from the same problems that affect all wireless services. Rain and snow absorb the signal, reducing the quality of the service during storms, an effect the industry calls “rain fade.” Trees and other plants are filled with water and can cause the same problems even when the sun is shining. Thick walls are also a challenge. Being closer to the tower is always better for service. All of these effects work together, so it’s no surprise that the maps of WiMAX service show that early deployment is concentrated in the densest part of the city where trees are rare. That’s where the most people will find the best reception.

But wireless also comes with advantages. I’ve averaged about one visit from the phone or cable company every year or so because the copper wires coming to my house need their care. Both services require internal wiring that must either be fished through the walls or the baseboard. Wireless service to the home avoids these problems.

The Xohm/Clearwire base station can sit anywhere in the house and it can even be moved, but putting it on a higher floor near a window improves service. If the house isn’t near the tower, it may even help to put it on the closest side of the house where there’s no dense foliage in the path. Using the WiMAX laptop card alone also works under the same conditions.

The more I used the laptop while travelling around the city, the more aware I became of the time it took Windows to start. While the Internet service may be available everywhere, it took several painful minutes for Windows to boot up. To make matters worse, the U300 card needs its own minute or so to look for a signal.

Some netbook manufacturers are experimenting with adding a simpler operating system that can start much faster than Microsoft Windows. These machines can boot up in less than 10 seconds but only by loading a lightweight operating system that offers a few basic services like a Web browser or Skype. The full version of Windows is still available if you need it. Needless to say, offering such a start-up time will change the utility of these micro-laptops considerably.

Speeding the start-up time will be crucial if the netbooks want to compete with smart-phones for casual use by people on the go. The bandwidth is ready to supply full-size applications that augment reality with an endless heavy stream of data. Scott Richardson, chief strategy officer of Clearwire, told me: “I did a demonstration in Portland with some computer industry guys. I was driving down a road going 60 miles per hour and I got a 14 megabits-per-second download.”

Portland came online in January of this year and Clearwire just announced that it was selling service in Atlanta and Las Vegas a few weeks ago. This isn’t the end. Clearwire says it’s on to Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth, Honolulu, Seattle and Charlotte, N.C. They’re all fine cities, even if they don’t all have the same level of baseball and the same fertile source of inspiration for narrative crime dramas.

http://tinyurl.com/lp9h2b

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 07-Aug-09 14:03:57
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WHY CELLULAR CARRIERS HAVE NOT DELIVERED ON THE MOBILE INTERNET

WiMAX.com
06.08.09

In the first of two articles, Siavash Alamouti, CTO of Intel's Mobile Wireless Group, provides an assessment of the industry's progress and what needs to be done to make mobile broadband access ubiquitous and affordable.

Abstract

Siavash Alamouti, CTO of Intel's Mobile Wireless Group offers insight and perspective on: "the traditional cellular voice model and the walled garden," mobile Internet user requirements, business models, cellular network evolution (including 3G and LTE), mobile WiMAX, and related topics. Cellular industry hype vs. reality is examined in a very provocative way. A checklist of the necessary ingredients for the success of mobile broadband is provided along with commentary and opinions.

Expert Opinion and Assessment of the Current State of the Cellular Industry

Siavash Alamouti is a cellular industry veteran in a very young industry. He worked on the development of mobile data protocols in the early 1990s for several companies, including AT&T Wireless. He's also worked on smart antenna technologies for WiFi and vertical applications of wireless communications using unlicensed spectrum. He is most well known for the invention of the Alamouti Code which is now included in almost every wireless standard. When he joined Intel in 2004, he had the opportunity to meet with senior executives of the established cellular carriers to assess their status and future plans. He was very disappointed with their lack of appreciation for the opportunities that would result from a mobile Internet.

Siavash believes the cellular industry has stagnated over the last few years, because of its intense focus on voice and low data rate communications (for text messaging/SMS and emails). Despite expensive auctions for spectrum, 3G data services (HSPDA and EVDO) have not lived up to the potential of the broadband Internet. The cellular industry spent a lot of money for the licensed spectrum without knowing what the killer application would be.

As a result, the telcos did not make much progress in enabling mobile Internet access. It's ten years since the 3GPP release of Wideband CDMA and UMTS (3G protocols), but affordable consumer mobile Internet has not really happened yet.

Here are a few staggering statistics from Screen Digest to support this assertion:

- Less than 9 percent of the 186 million people with 3G phone service have mobile broadband Internet service. Those who do have it, have paid €3.6 billion ($5.1 billion) to operators in 2008

- That was just 6.8 percent of 3G operators total revenue from data, which implies that over 93 percent of mobile data revenue came from SMS/text messaging.

- Only 1% of the total global cellular industry revenue came from mobile broadband access


Telco Problems: Limited Service & High Revenues

Consumers in the US are paying an average of $50 per month for 10-50 Kbps service on mobile operators' networks. That constitutes 99% of the total revenues of the mobile operators. In 2009, we are seeing a shift towards higher data services thanks to new devices like the iPhone. However, the experience of these devices are nowhere like the Internet experience on a PC.

The iPhone (offered exclusively in the U.S. by AT&T Wireless) was the first time users experienced a decent web browsing on a mobile device thanks to a very user-friendly interface and attractive form factor. The iPhone has proven that there is pent up demand for mobile Internet. However, the weakest attribute of the iPhone is the relatively poor performance of the 3G networks, which has resulted in a class action lawsuit and many customer complaints.

To prevent even worse performance, AT&T has blocked selected bandwidth intensive applications like Sling box video (www.slingmedia.com ) on their 3G network. Using the iPhone as a 3G modem (tethering) is also still prohibited by AT&T, because it could quickly saturate the network and jeopardise their cash cows- cellular voice and SMS. As a result, WiFi is used more than 3G for Internet browsing by most iPhone subscribers.

A January 2009 Cisco study revealed that users generate 30 times more traffic on a smart phone compared to a standard cell phone - and notebooks will send and receive 450 times more traffic than a smart phone. So it's clear the trend is to provide much more throughput and higher bandwidth to mobile Internet subscribers. But this has not yet happened in any meaningful way.

Mobile data rates are generally limited to less than 1 Mbps for HSPA and EVDO based 3G data service. And no mobile operator in the US is offering unlimited 3G Internet service (i.e. Internet access with no data caps). If they did, the network capacity would become saturated, resulting in denial of Internet service for many users.

Editors Note: Typical 3G pricing is $60 per month with a data cap of 2G to 5G bytes transferred per month. Additional data transferred is usually priced in 1G byte increments.

Siavash believes that for decent mobile Internet service, the network must deliver at least 1 to 5 M bit/sec (Downstream) and a monthly rate of not more than $30 per month in developing countries ($10 per month in developing countries) with flat rate pricing. That's 100 times the service at ½ the price!

And therein lies the problem: low cost per bit is hard to deliver on a cellular network (including 3G and 3G+ technologies). This is one reason Siavash firmly believes that new mobile broadband technologies (dubbed as 4G) are needed today and 3G cannot fulfill the vision for mobile Internet. This is why Intel and the rest of the WiMAX community created the IEEE 802.16e standard and developed the resulting technology to meet the perceived user requirements for mobile broadband Internet access.

Siavash firmly believes that mobile WiMAX can significantly drive down the cost per bit, while significantly increasing user throughput - especially when compared to 3G technologies (HSPDA/HSPA and EVDO). Spectral efficiency, low cost infrastructure, and low cost modems are all needed to realize low cost per bit wireless transport. Mobile WiMAX can deliver on all of those attributes, today. To quantify this, he claims that the data throughput of Mobile WiMAX is three times better than HSPA and that is why operators like Clearwire in the US and Yota in Russia can provide unlimited Internet access at half the price of 3G services, which are often subject to data caps

All Agree: The Internet Needs to Go Mobile

Many industry analysts and strategists believe that the future growth of the Internet will come from mobile broadband applications, especially entertainment, information retrieval, and education. A June 2008 OECD Policy Brief on the Future Internet Economy stated: "The Internet underpins a range of new economic activities, as well as activities and infrastructures that support our economies, from financial markets and health services to energy and transport. In the longer term, small wireless sensor devices embedded in objects, equipment and facilities are likely to be integrated with the Internet through wireless networks that will enable interconnectivity anywhere and at anytime."

Consumers demand true "Broadband" Internet Services all over the world. The Internet experience is global and does not have boundaries. To be able to access all the video, graphics and multi-media content available, multi-Mega bit/sec service is needed for a decent user experience.

Moreover, data rate needs will increase with time. Video will be the primary bandwidth driver, as it has been for the last several years since You Tube and similar applications became popular. New wired broadband technologies (DOCSiS 3.0, VDSL 2, FTTH/FTTP) will push the requirements quickly and wireless technologies need to keep up with this. This is why emerging wireless standard like IEEE 802.16m and 3GPP's LTE Advanced are targeting peak rates of up to 1 Gbps.

For sure, there is pent up demand for mobile Internet, but there are many inhibiting factors:

- Cost per bit in wireless networks is too high to keep up with (e.g. Cable or DSL) rates
- It is much more difficult to increase data rates on the air compared to the wire
- Consumers do NOT understand the cellular data usage model and limitation on usage
- There are multiple law suits on over-billing usage, network neutrality, user data privacy
- Cellular value chain is not friendly to retail device model since it has been optimised for phones sold through operator channels
- Mass market growth of the mobile Internet requires innovation on services and creating a new paradigm for consumer access which is very different to today's operator model
- Cost per bit is even more important in developing countries due to low ARPU required for mass- market adoption.

Despite all these challenges, Internet is a major growth engine for our economies. There are studies that indicate a direct correlation between broadband Internet access and GDP. Therefore, necessity will drive innovation and make mobile Internet happen in a big way.


What's Needed for the Mobile Internet to Succeed

Alamouti believes the ingredients for Mobile Internet success include the following:

- Ubiquitous Connectivity and Open Networks - any time, anywhere, any device or application on any network
- Affordable flat-rate Charging & Flexible Billing Plans
- Device Retail Model that works for consumers
- Simple Roaming between carriers
- True Internet -not Mini-Internets
- Open and PC-like Mobile Computing Devices, e.g. netbooks and MIDs
- Low-cost/Low Power PCs with embedded mobile broadband adaptors
- Low cost modems
- Sufficient backhaul capacity to support many multi-megabit subscribers

Siavash believes that the primary objective of mobile network operators should be to deliver "ubiquitous, transparent access to the (broadband) Internet." The first step in realising the potential and power of the mobile Internet is to make it truly open. That is, the capability to use any device or application on any network at any time. The telcos "walled garden" approach must be broken for this to happen. In a truly open network, you should be able to use free Skype VoIP service or Slingbox features on your mobile phone without blocking or additional charges from the mobile network operator.

Editors Note: We wonder how mobile operators will deal with the potential voice revenue cannibalisation by free Internet voice applications such as Skype or Google Voice?

Mobile WiMAX is only a radio technology and by its own accord cannot break the telcos walled garden. It is up to the cellular operators to use the network in a way that will provide free access to the consumer. Nevertheless, the WiMAX Forum has been promoting open broadband access and has been specifying technology ingredients that would allow the mobile operator to create a new service paradigm and enable the retail distribution of devices.

The Way Forward for the Mobile Internet

Alamouti suggests that mobile operators need to revolutionise their services and provide flexible service plans that would be affordable to everyone. He believes mobilisation of the Internet would grow economies immensely. In his view, the mobile operator could take a percentage of additional revenues that would justify their investment in 4G mobile networks and provide free and open access to valuable and essential services to the consumer.

In one scenario, mobile Internet access to government, education and health care would be free, as those entities would pay the mobile operator a fixed rate for access to their services. In another scenario, textbooks and other educational content could be accessed for free by registered public school students via the mobile Internet.

Mobile operators should be providing network connectivity says Alamouti. The concept of the Application Service Providers (ASP's) should be separated from the cellular network operator. New revenue sharing models need to be worked out between these two entities. They key to enabling these spiffy new mobile Internet applications is for the network operator to collaborate with the ASP to deliver the service and monetise the applications. There is no reason why Mobile Operators could not also provide applications as well but they should not be the sole source as this will limit their potential for consumer value and hence revenue.

In Part II of our interview with Siavash Alamouti, we will highlight the mobile Internet applications and technologies necessary for 4G networks to be realised on a large scale.

http://tinyurl.com/mdal38

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 11-Aug-09 11:44:47
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Did anyone try to watch that awful "The Gadget Show" item last night, about a mobile wireless v wired trip?


SKYCROSS ENABLES THE WiMAX ECOSYSTEM TO REALISE IT'S POTENTIAL

Business Wire 10.08.09

iMAT® Antenna Technology From SkyCross Improves Network Performance and Enables Operators to Deliver a WiMAX User Experience That Matches Its Promise


SkyCross, a global antenna designer and manufacturer, delivers a WiMAX solution enabling client devices to perform at a level that improves the capacity, data rates, and reliability of the entire WiMAX network. Many WiMAX network operators, who have invested billions to deliver the world’s first 4G infrastructure, are finding that iMAT® antennas from SkyCross are an essential ingredient to not only offer optimal performance but also to reduce build-out costs.

With a total of 475 WiMAX networks deployed in 140 countries in April 2009 according to the WiMAX Forum® and more than 50 million users expected in 2014 as predicted by Juniper Research, WiMAX has high growth potential, but its adoption hinges on meeting and exceeding WiMAX users’ expectations for a 4G network. First, they want fast data rates to download multimedia material. Second, users expect seamless connectivity and have little patience for poor coverage or lost connections. This fast seamless connection must be available on any mobile device, whether it’s a MID, USB dongle, smart-phone, netbook, notebook, or other gadget.

The promise of higher data rates, increased network capacity, and better reliability for end users is made possible in part by the MIMO (multiple-input, multiple-output) component of the WIMAX specification. Mobile devices that support MIMO typically have multiple resonators, but space constraints and interference issues make this a difficult implementation challenge that can result in cumbersome, expensive solutions. Given that the antenna is the only structure in the mobile device that communicates directly with the wireless network, the MIMO challenge must be addressed skilfully and artfully to ensure that end user WiMAX experience is satisfying.

SkyCross iMAT antennas address the MIMO challenge by enabling a single antenna element to behave like multiple optimised antennas, which streamlines the integration process, enables sleeker designs, and lowers cost, when compared to non-iMAT antennas. The superior performance that iMAT delivers to small devices is proven by several independent tests. Intel conducted active field tests on the Sprint network in Hillsborough, Oregon, and found that devices with SkyCross iMAT antennas offer up to 2.5 times faster data rates, particularly in fringe areas, when compared to a conventional two-antenna approach. Beceem tested the maximum MIMO throughput of WIMAX modems using a variety of different antennas such as PCB and ceramic chip antennas. The tests concluded that the SkyCross iMAT antenna yielded the highest throughput on average.

“Requiring network devices to have an iMAT antenna from SkyCross is the simplest way for operators to boost the system performance without having to build more towers or implement other expensive techniques,” said Joe Gifford, Vice President at SkyCross. “A greater number of highly efficient network devices improves the overall network capacity, and SkyCross makes this possible. Many global WiMAX operators are catching on and insisting that their suppliers use iMAT antennas.”

iMAT initially appeared in the first USB dongle certified by the WiMAX Forum, and network operators have since realised its benefits in major WiMAX launches around the world. SkyCross has delivered antennas for the first client device offered on the Sprint XoHM network in Baltimore and the first Tecom USB dongle for the VMAX network in Taiwan. SkyCross iMAT antennas power the Samsung SWC-U200 USB dongle, which www.wimaxian.com claims is “the best device to access Yota WiMAX in Russia.” SkyCross is also delivering iMAT antennas for several devices on the UQ Communications network in Japan and the Clearwire network in the United States.

SkyCross www.skycross.com is a global designer and manufacturer of antenna solutions for the mobile phone, home entertainment, and computing industries. SkyCross provides unique high-performance antenna technology bundled with RF system-level expertise and responsive regional support from its full-service facilities in the USA, South Korea, China, Taiwan, and Japan. This convenient approach empowers device manufacturers to develop winning consumer electronics products and deliver them to market faster and easier.

Contacts:
Coracle Group LLC
Lisa A. Eppert leppert@coraclegroup.com

Permalink: http://www.businesswire.com/news/newsnow/20090810005...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 12-Aug-09 07:34:57
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
C'mon Mr Li, take a gamble, you can do it for us.

CLEARWIRE ADDS HUAWEI AS WiMAX SUPPLIER

Mobile Tech News
11.08.09

Kirkland, WA -- Clearwire Communications, LLC, an operating subsidiary of Clearwire Corporation, today announced the completion of its 4G network infrastructure supplier selections, following the signing of an agreement that adds Huawei to a vendor mix that includes Motorola, Samsung, Cisco, Ciena and DragonWave.

Under the new agreement announced today, Huawei will supply WiMAX radio access network (RAN) equipment to facilitate Clearwire’s rollout of super fast mobile Internet service across the United States, called CLEAR™. Specifically, Huawei will provide several key infrastructure pieces, including base stations, element management system (EMS) components, and related network hardware and software. As part of today’s announcement, Clearwire named several other strategic suppliers for the network rollout, which include: Motorola and Samsung for RAN equipment; Cisco for the core Internet Protocol (IP) Next-Generation Network infrastructure; Ciena for base station switching; and DragonWave for the network’s microwave backhaul transport; Motorola also provides additional microwave backhaul equipment.

“Our new network is specifically designed to deliver an unmatched combination of 4G speeds, capacity, and mobility to meet the growing demand for wireless broadband services,” said Dr. John Saw, Chief Technology Officer for Clearwire. “As such, we have designed an all-IP network that is efficient, low-cost and scalable using standards-based technology from industry-leading providers. Our existing agreements with Motorola, Samsung, Cisco, and DragonWave, plus today’s addition of Huawei, provide us with the capabilities and support necessary to deliver super fast mobile Internet in more ways for both our customers and strategic wholesalers.”

“Clearwire’s vision for connecting the Internet to people, not just places, and their dedication to building the first nationwide WiMAX network in the United States is an exciting opportunity for Huawei,” said Wan Biao, President of Huawei Wireless Product Line. “Today’s announcement is an important milestone and represents a significant step toward establishing Huawei’s presence in North America and further demonstrates our commitment to delivering high-quality products and services to our customers.”

More...

http://www.mobiletechnews.com/info/2009/08/11/112957...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 19-Aug-09 23:27:28
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
See what happens when one goes on holiday!

At long last Mr Li appears to have made his move and our prayers may be about to be eventually answered.

Any feedback from the lucky few survivers in Reading?


TELENT PROVIDES WiMAX TRANSITION SERVICES FOR UK BROADBAND Ltd

Presswire
13.08.09

Alan Campbell Group (ACG) – a telent company, has successfully completed cut-over works on behalf of UK Broadband Limited across their Reading sites, transferring UK Broadband’s TD-CDMA (Time Division Code Division Multiple Access) network to a 4th Generation technology - mobile WiMAX - for what is believed to be the only 4G network in the UK.

ACG provided project management, materials handling and logistics, and site deployment services, enabling UK Broadband to provide wireless data transmission using a variety of modes, which have demonstrated speeds of 20mbps on a dongle.

In order to mitigate risk and minimise network outage time, ACG undertook extensive preparatory work in advance of the agreed cut-over date, undertaking specific installation and commissioning works whilst the existing network was still up and running. This pre-transition work was of true benefit to UK Broadband and its end-users, enabling the actual transition works to be reduced from a three-day network outage down to a short outage of just a few hours.

Simon Fawthrop, SVP Operations, UK Broadband Ltd said: “ACG worked tirelessly towards the end of April in preparing our Reading sites for transition. Everything went smoothly and worked according to plan”

“Reading is very important to UK Broadband,” continued Simon. “We successfully launched our pre-WiMAX wireless broadband technology (TD-CDMA) in Reading and the service proved very popular. Now that WiMAX is available we will be deploying it in the UK. It was therefore essential that the Reading swap over to WiMAX went smoothly. Reading now has the first 4G WiMAX service in the UK.”

“The physical transition of the TDCDMA equipment to WiMAX successfully took place seamlessly as planned on 12th May, with minimum disruption to the UK Broadband network and its end-user services. We chose ACG because of their reputation, and their ability to provide services on a large-scale. Their knowledge and expertise meant we were able to thoroughly work through the practicalities associated with the cut-over works, ultimately minimising network disruption for our customers.”

Peter Bridgman, Business Director at ACG added, “We are delighted to use our expertise to assist UK Broadband in deploying their WiMAX services. Our well-established track record in providing end-to-end services across the wireless market enables us to ensure a successful and hassle-free delivery for our customers. UK Broadband is an important customer to ACG and we hope to work with then in the future as their wireless services expand even further.”

About telent & Alan Campbell Group – a telent company:

With annual revenues of over £300 million, telent has decades of experience in supplying a broad range of network and communications services in the UK and Germany. Today, the privately-held company employs over 2,600 people and has one of the largest engineering field forces in the UK. Alan Campbell Group, a telent company, is one of the largest communications infrastructure providers in the UK telecommunications and broadcast sectors. It provides a range of end-to-end solutions across the UK - from network design, microwave and cellular installation and commissioning to logistical and technical support services, and major construction and broadcast site services. Main customer base includes Airwave, Arqiva, Ericsson, Nokia (now NSN), Orange, T-Mobile and Vodafone.

For more information, see the company's website:
http://www.telent.com/ACG
Press enquiries:
Chris Newman, +44 (0)1926 693 830, chris.newman@telent.com

About UK Broadband Limited:

UK Broadband (UKB) is a wireless network operator that owns the only national 3.5GHz WiMAX spectrum licence in the UK. UKB was established in 2003 and is a wholly owned subsidiary of PCCW.

2009/2010 will see the commencement of the adoption of WiMAX technologies and networks in many countries in the world including the USA, where it is already operational, Japan and India. UKB is adopting and applying this 4G WiMAX technology in the UK.

WiMAX and 4G is specifically designed to provide efficient low cost mobile broadband. As the only company in the UK with a 4G national spectrum license and thus the only company able to deploy 4G technologies to provide enhanced mobile broadband in the UK in the foreseeable future.

In accordance with where the mobile broadband need is greatest, as identified by the Government’s Digital Britain Report, UKB will commence WiMAX deployment by providing wireless broadband services to the public sector in major cities which will include broadband backup to school, safe broadband access for digitally excluded students and other wireless services to local government. UKB will also offer broadband wholesale services through universities and other internet providers.

For more information on UK Broadband or WiMAX contact:
PR Manager
UK Broadband Limited
6 The Square
Stockley Park East
Uxbridge UB11 1FW
Tel: 0207 993 4035
Email: media@ukbroadband.com

About PCCW

PCCW Limited is a Hong Kong listed company and is the largest and most comprehensive provider of communications services in Hong Kong. The company is also one of Asia's leading players in Information and Communications Technologies (ICT). PCCW employs approximately 14,000 staff and has a presence in China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, India, USA, South America and Europe.

http://tinyurl.com/l9gnhd

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 25-Aug-09 12:22:56
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Do not miss the best feature of this story which is the attached Forum:
WiMAX has a definite niche and IMO it's alive and well
Too lengthy to reproduce.


THIS IS NOT THE WiMAX MIRACLE WE WERE PROMISED

BROADBAND (dsl) REPORTS

Karl Bode 21.08.09

'Most important thing since the Internet itself' was always just niche player...

We've been watching WiMAX backer Intel's marketing department drum up deafening hype about the technology for running on five years, initially calling WiMAX "the most important thing since the Internet itself." This resulted in a lot of uncritical and bubbly news reports, starting in 2004, proclaiming that WiMAX was a cable and DSL competitor, before it had even really left the development gate.

Half a decade later finds Clearwire as the only major U.S. player in the Mobile WiMAX space, with barely a handful of major launch markets under their belt. In response, Intel has spent a lot of time in 2009 in damage control mode, claiming that those critical of Mobile WiMAX's slow deployment weren't noticing the extraordinary success the technology was having overseas. But a number of analysts have been seeing storm clouds on the horizon:
In the USA, Sprint is rolling out a national WiMAX network through its majority shareholding in Clearwire, but the growth in number of subscribers has been disappointing. Google and Intel, among others, have already written off billions of dollars they had invested in Clearwire. This does not look good for WiMAX. Also, it appears that the North American CDMA operators may move to LTE, rather than to WiMAX.
But overseas things are rosy, just like Intel said, right? Not so much:
In developed European markets, operators are almost certainly upgrading their 3G technologies to 4G LTE in order to match the rising demand for data. Analysys Mason’s Research division recently carried out an extensive series of interviews with the leading MNOs in Europe: none of the operators interviewed hinted that they might adopt WiMAX, now that LTE is imminent. They see WiMAX as a technology to be deployed in an ad hoc fashion in developing countries.
Of course if you were paying attention back in 2004, you knew that Mobile WiMAX's best bet was as a niche solution, and not the major alternative pipe revolution Intel promised. Even when you set the technology aside, it's hard to bet against the combined might of both AT&T and Verizon in the LTE wireless space.

http://www.broadbandreports.com/shownews/This-Is-Not...

Go to link and read the Forum

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 26-Aug-09 11:35:22
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
HEY, CLEARWIRE: THIS IS HOW YOU DO WiMAX

ExtremeTech

Sascha Segan 25.08.09

PCMag.com editor-in-chief Lance Ulanoff and I are in Korea for the week, and I spent my Monday talking about and testing WiMAX, which the Koreans call WiBro, or wireless broadband.

The Korean technology is exactly what Clearwire is currently installing in cities like Baltimore, Portland, and Atlanta, albeit on a different frequency.

WiBro launched in April 2007, and it's available across the Seoul metropolitan area. That's only one city, but it's half the Korean population. KT, the service provider, said they have about 300,000 subscribers for a range of plans priced at $10/month for 1-Gbyte, $20/month for 30GB, or $27/month for 50GB of usage.

The WiBro experience in Seoul shows what true, high-speed wireless could feel like if it's done right. Deep in the Seoul subway system, Samsung hooked us up with adorable, candy-colored N310 netbooks with AnyCall USB WiBro modems. We pulled down fearsome speeds: 4.3 megabits down and 1.5 megabits up while sitting still in a station, and 4.1 megabits down and 900 kilobits up while zooming along on a train. Streaming video was a snap.

The experience reminded me: it's not the technology, it's the build-out. In recent WiMAX tests in Baltimore, I got a fraction of the speed I got in the Seoul subway. WiMAX requires a solid network of well-placed transmitters with plenty of backhaul to work well. If you go cheap on the buildout, you end up with lousy speeds.

At the "W Style Shop" showroom, I also discovered that there are a lot more WiMAX devices than Clearwire or Sprint have let on about. Aside from WiMAX laptops, I saw a handheld WiMAX-to-Wi-Fi router called the "Egg," two (two!) WiMAX phones, a USB modem that doubles as an MP3 player, and a WiMAX powered navigation device.

The WiMAX phones were the most interesting, of course. They used WiMAX to do video calling, and "ordinary" 3G cellular to make voice calls. True VoIP over WiMAX, with the appropriate quality of service measures to make it sound non-crappy, is coming soon to Korea.

I've been frustrated with Clearwire's build-out and marketing for a while, and this just made me more frustrated. While Korea bounds into 4G with various devices, Clear is moving much more slowly. I'll have another post about Clear's most interesting device, the Samsung Mondi, soon.

http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,2845,2351987,0...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Sun 30-Aug-09 18:55:32
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
IS WiMAX'S 'PORTABILITY' A BIGGER LURE FOR BUSINESSES THAN MOBILITY?

Light Reading's UNSTRUNG

Paul Kapusta 28.08.09

When WiMAX providers talk about the technology’s attributes, cellular-like mobility is usually near the top of the list. But for many business users WiMAX’s simple portability --the ability to pick up and move your broadband connection -- may prove to be a more powerful economic and operational lure, the kind of money-saving, hassle-free attribute that gets CIOs interested and gets POs signed. That is some of the thinking that emerged from our latest report, something we call the "Sidecut Reports WiMAX Business Deployment Guide."

The qualifying statement underlying such a theory: Since WiMAX services are so new, there simply aren't enough business users yet to get any empirical data to prove such a point. But if Sprint is already rushing out workgroup versions of the innovative Clear Spot portable WiFi/WiMAX router, that means we aren't the only ones who see a potential market for cheap, easy-to-deploy bandwidth on demand. For small businesses who may need to move around, or workgroups and branch operations of larger enterprises, having Internet access that isn't tied to a wire in the wall seems like something to kick the tires on, at the very least. And with day passes or no-contract options, WiMAX services from Clearwire allow business users to do just that without signing up for a two-year deal.

Maybe later this fall and next year, when Clearwire finally launches services in true-commuter cities like Chicago and New York, we'll see business uses that embrace WiMAX's ability to support cellular-like connectivity. Or maybe we'll see that emerge if and when we ever get a WiMAX phone here in the U.S. But for right now, it seems like the ability to pick up your broadband and move it across the cube, across the hall, across campus or across town might be the most compelling reason for businesses to give WiMAX a try.

http://www.unstrung.com/blog.asp?blog_sectionid=776&...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 01-Sep-09 13:14:49
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
LONG LIVE WiMAX

ElectronicsWeekly

David Manners 28.08.09

A single world standard for 4G cellular networks would be a fine thing. It would produce economies of scale for equipment suppliers and it would simplify roaming. But it's not, of course, going to happen.

Although LTE will clearly be the dominant standard in the First World, in the emerging economies WiMAX is going to have a place because there are fewer 3G investments to protect, and WiMAX is cheaper to install than LTE.

But WiMAX will continue to have a potential role in the First World - as a stick to beat the incumbent suppliers with if they get even more complacent.

That's because WiMAX is the route into the wireless operator market for non-incumbents.

The GSA, the Global Mobile Suppliers Association, announced yesterday that the number of operators committing to LTE has doubled since March.

That means 39 operators are going LTE and, with LTE standardisation complete and approved by 3GPP within Release 8, 'it is now the natural migration choice for GSM/HSPA network operators', says the GSA. It's also the natural business course for anyone trying to protect their 3G investment.

The GSA expects to see 14 LTE networks in service by the end of next year and 31 by the end of 2012.

Judging by what the operators are saying however, the extra carrying capacity of LTE will be used initially to free up inner city areas where the networks are getting clogged.

So we, the general public, are not going to see much benefit from the LTE roll-out in the form of better connection speeds.

You can bet your bottom dollar that the operators are going to stick to their traditional policy of being as stingy with extra capacity as they can get away with.

This is where WiMAX comes in. With European and US regulators seemingly incapable of getting the wireless operators to keep their capacities up to their advertised performance levels, what we need are some long-pocketed mavericks to get into European and US markets and start giving customers high data speeds via WiMAX networks.

Providing cracking good high performance networks in competition with the incumbents is the only way to get the incumbents to improve the capacities of their European and US networks.

And WiMAX provides the only way in for the long-pocketed mavericks.

So long live WiMAX

http://tinyurl.com/menkcw

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 03-Sep-09 15:22:17
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
I assume this release is related to the previous "Talent Provides Service to UKB" posted here 2 weeks ago on 19.08.09.
I have taken the liberty of editing the original text, which seems to have been translated from Russian!
Still no official announcements from either UKB or NOW.

As for "Eye WiMAX", make what you will of the following:
http://www.eyewimax.com/store/business-services.html
http://tinyurl.com/9joven



ZYXEL WiMAX MODEM AVAILABLE FOR NOW WIRELESS BROADBAND

WiMAXian

01.09.09

Yesterday WiMAXian featured Zyxel’s WiMAX modem for Yota (in Russia).

Today, WiMAXian features anotherZyxel’s product - the MAX-216M1- a WiMAX modem which will be available for the "Now Wireless Broadband" service in the UK.

The story began with Hongkong’s largest internet service provider, PCCW, setting up here as “UK Broadband” (UKB) and acquiring 3.5GHz WiMAX spectrum licences.

UKB introduced TD-CDMA wireless broadband in the Thames Valley area in mid 2004 and subsequently extended this service into West London in September 2005, under the name of “Now Wireless Broadband”.

Actually EyeWiMAX was the first to provide WiMAX here, operating in Manchester. (See above)

The Zyxel MAX-216M1 will be made available as a WiMAX modem by “Now Wireless Broadband” in London and across the UK.

The Zyxel MAX-216M1 is equipped with two detachable, swivelling, antennae (MIMO). Key features of this new device include high speed wireless data transfer (capable of reaching over 30Mb/s) and more efficient use of radio frequency spectrum.

This performance is made possible through the use of adaptive signal processing and decoders with increased resistance to interference.

This not only improves the density of connection of subscribers, but also significantly reduces energy consumption for end-user devices.

Along with an Ethernet port, the modem is fitted with a Foreign eXchange Station (FXS) port, to connect a handset, which could allow subscribers to have a VoIP service if and when available.

Open link to view images.

http://tinyurl.com/lmnk5x

I regret to report that I missed this item posted on ISPreview last March:

UPDATE: Now UK Wireless Broadband ISP to be Discontinued
By: MarkJ - 18 March, 2009

Now (formerly Netvigator), a UK Fixed Access Wireless broadband ISP that is backed by UK Broadband Ltd. (wholly-owned subsidiary of Hong Kong's PCCW telco), could be closing as early as next month if the information we've received is to be believed.

In fact no new information has come out of the ISP itself since February last year, when it was revealed that UK Broadband had won 4 of the 40GHz licences being auctioned by Ofcom. This cost them a hefty £120,000 but would have made deploying faster WiMAX based broadband services a possibility.

It’s also well known that NOW has not updated its packages in a long time, with their fastest option continuing to be a woefully outdated 1Mbps package. By comparison many UK ISPs now offer speeds that are considerably faster.

Details on the situation itself remain difficult to find, although one of several customers informed us that the provider will be "discontinuing" their service on 21st April 2009. Attempts to reach the ISP have so far gone unanswered and the 'Abouts Us' page on NOW's site does not appear to function properly.

UPDATE: 20th March 2009 @ 12:20am:
Faisal Ahmed, UK Broadband Ltd's (PCCW) VP for Strategy and Planning, has given us the following reply. It seems like the service is being upgraded but scaled back to focus on the 'Reading' area:

"As part of our evaluation of WiMAX (4G) technology, we are transitioning our existing (TD-CDMA) network. This will involve migrating the now Wireless Broadband customer base in Reading to a WiMAX (4G) service. Outside of Reading, the transition programme will regrettably mean the loss of service to customers as we gradually upgrade the network to WiMAX (4G)."

http://tinyurl.com/dedj4r

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 07-Sep-09 11:30:24
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WIRELESS GOALPOSTS MOVE, WITH 802.16m STEPS and LTE CORE TRIALS

RETHINK WIRELESS

Daily Newsletter 04.09.09

The next generation wireless game is one of constantly moving goalposts and even as one platform is trialled, the next is already in the works. This week sees a milestone for the next iteration of the standard underpinning WiMAX, 802.16m, and the first operator trial plans for interoperability in the LTE core network.

Although Vodafone does not intend to roll out LTE until 2012 at the earliest, it is working intensively on tests and trials, mainly with its partners China Mobile and Verizon Wireless, both of which plan commercial networks from 2010. The Chinese giant has been working on trials of the TDD-LTE variant in Spain (with Motorola), and larger scale tests in China, with multiple suppliers, are just starting. Now, with Vodafone, it is the first to sign up for LTE roaming and interoperability initiatives, under the auspices of the MultiService Forum's LTE and System Architecture Evolution (SAE) interoperability test, which will kick off in March 2010. According to Unstrung.com, this will focus heavily on the Evolved Packet Core (EPC), working on scenarios such as LTE access to the core, roaming, backward compatibility with 2G and 3G into the core, handover and relocation, and access into IMS.

Over on the WiMAX side, draft one of the 802.16m standard has moved closer to standardization. The 16m Working Group met on July 13-16 in San Francisco, and agreed to open a ballot on the first draft of the standard, which could be finalized in 2011. The group will issue a request for input on technical topics such as location-based services, relay and self-organizing networks.

Peter Jarich, research director of Current Analysis, wrote in TelephonyOnline recently: "By promising an evolution, 802.16m could help convince operators that Mobile WiMAX truly delivers investment protection - potentially driving WiMAX uptake (particularly if LTE stalls). Beyond that, however, the industry has been remarkably silent on the standard. 802.16m progress, sooner rather than later, is still critical."

The WiMAX Forum has also announced that validation testing for the 2.3GHz Mobile WiMAX profile in the 5/10MHz and 8.75MHz channels has begun and expects the first group of 2.3GHz products to be certified in the fourth quarter. "The certification of 2.3GHz products is critical to the deployment of WiMAX networks in regions such as India, Asia and Africa," said Ed Agis, co-chair of the WiMAX Forum Certification Working Group. "Certification profiles for 2.3GHz also pave the way for WiMAX Forum Certified triband devices in 2010 which will increase the opportunities for true global roaming."

In the shorter term, the WiMAX vendors are realigning. As expected, Nokia Siemens will no longer sell its own product - despite an agreement to supply Sprint Xohm (prior to the Clearwire merger) with a WiMAX version of its Flexi base station, the firm had shown limited interest or real world products. It will now participate in WiMAX contracts via partner systems, and has taken on Alvarion's Mobile WiMAX range under an OEM agreement. NSN, via its Siemens half, has sold fixed WiMAX and proprietary BWA kit from the Israeli vendor for years. This shows the WiMAX market consolidating around key infrastructure players, notably Alvarion, Samsung, Motorola, Huawei and ZTE.

Alvarion was one of these taking part in a WiMAX demonstration in the UK this week. The country was once considered one of the hottest prospects for 802.16 because it planned an early auction of 2.6GHz licenses, long before LTE was available, and because it has a telco in British Telecom, which has shown strong interest in re-entering the wireless sector, via WiMAX. But the auction has been significantly delayed by a string of legal battles and debates over GSM spectrum refarming, plus the new Digital Britain plan, all of which could affect the pricing of the 2.6GHz licenses and carrier strategies for this spectrum.

So the original purpose of the trial - run in Maidstone in the south east of the country, by the Mobile WiMAX Acceleration Group (M-WAG) - was to impress regulator Ofcom with the business case for 802.16 ahead of an auction. Now the emphasis had shifted more towards a generic proof concept and technology, demonstrating a range of business cases for WiMAX on the UK's first live end-to-end 2.5GHz Mobile WiMAX system. The focus was on four applications - public safety, CCTV monitoring, building inspection and workforce mobility. The group said it clearly showed benefits for WiMAX over current technologies and processes, "as well as presenting new opportunities for service improvement and cost savings".

Caroline Gabriel 24.07.09

http://www.rethink-wireless.com/?article_id=1713


NEXT GENERATION MOBILE WiMAX

The Telecom blog

Cydi 06.09.09

WiMAX, meaning Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, is a telecommunications technology that provides wireless transmission of data using a variety of transmission modes, from point-to-multi-point links to portable and fully mobile internet access. Mobile WiMAX enables the convergence of mobile and fixed broadband networks through a common wide-area radio-access technology and flexible network architecture. The next-generation mobile WiMAX will be capable of data-transfer rates in excess of 1 Gbps. It is expected to support a wide range of high quality and high capacity IP-based services and applications while maintaining full backward compatibility with the existing mobile WiMAX systems.

Architecture Features
IEEE 802.16m (new version of the 802.16) uses OFDMA as the multiple access scheme in the Down-link and Up-link. It supports both time-division duplex (TDD) and frequency-division duplex (FDD) schemes including the half-duplex FDD (HFDD) operation of the mobile stations in the FDD networks. The frame structure attributes and base-band processing are common for both duplex schemes. The modulation schemes supported include quadrature-phase shift-
keying (QPSK), 16-QAM, and 64-QAM.To overcome the issue of performance of adaptive modulation, a constellation rearrangement scheme is utilised. The next generation mobile WiMAX supports advanced multi-antenna techniques like single and multiuser MIMO, along with various transmit diversity schemes. The MAC features are an extension of the existing standard.

This next generation system is designed to provide state-of-the-art mobile broadband wireless access in the next decade and to satisfy the growing demand for advanced wireless multimedia applications and services.

http://thetelecomblog.blogspot.com/2009/09/next-gene...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 16-Sep-09 10:24:29
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
ENABLING WiMAX SUCCESS WITH STANDARDS-BASED DEVICE MANAGEMENT

WiMAX.com
Lori Sylvia Red Bend Software
02.09.09

New applications and initiatives including the Open Mobile Alliance Device Management (OMA-DM) standard have been developed and adapted to meet the growing challenge of provisioning millions of subscribers and devices on next-generations broadband networks.

The increasing demand for mobile-enabled laptops, netbooks and other wireless end user devices is helping to fuel WiMAX growth globally. Yet the potential for future growth hinges on the ability of WiMAX operators and device makers to provide and maintain the quality of service and user experience Internet consumers expect.

Provisioning millions of new subscribers and managing millions of devices that will operate on the network, often temporarily, poses unique challenges to WiMAX operators. Managing a network that combines mobile and fixed equipment requires a new set of management capabilities.

To meet these challenges, the WiMAX market has embraced the Open Mobile Alliance Device Management (OMA-DM) standard, which has been proven in the cellular industry by managing hundreds of millions of mobile devices worldwide. The standard has been adapted to meet the distinct requirements of WiMAX operators, chipset makers and equipment manufacturers of fixed, nomadic and mobile devices.

In the cellular market, the OMA-DM enabler is used by operators and manufacturers to remotely manage mobile phones and other devices over the air, including performing firmware updates, provisioning, configuration management and diagnostics. WiMAX operators, like Clearwire in the U.S., are choosing to manage devices using OMA-DM and have included it as a mandate in building their networks. To meet this requirement, WiMAX chipset makers and equipment manufacturers are actively embedding standards-based OMA-DM client software into their products. WiMAX chipset makers including Intel, Beceem and Fujitsu Microelectronics are embracing OMA-DM client software to further accelerate device development and ensure out-of-the-box network interoperability in all the major mobile WiMAX networks.

Although the U.S. WiMAX market remains in its early stages, it is poised for significant expansion this year with rollouts in major cities like Portland, Las Vegas, Chicago, and Atlanta. In order to compete or surpass current networks such as cellular, DSL and cable, WiMAX operators need to capture market share with compelling pricing, prove the technology's capability and deliver high bandwidth and other functionality not available in current networks and do so quickly, within the next 1-2 years (before LTE becomes a serious threat). By leveraging the cost-effectiveness of standards-based device management, WiMAX operators and device makers will be well positioned to support expansion with the scalability and efficiency within their networks by adhering to the OMA-DM standard.

As important as OMA-DM is to the current phase of WiMAX deployment, it will be even more important as these networks evolve by providing the platform to deliver more advanced applications and services to WiMAX consumers in the future. The prospects for WiMAX are merely up to the imagination of the operators and their ability to offer attractive services, regardless of the device. The bandwidth capabilities anticipated in WiMAX will likely bring unprecedented access to video, movies and more, driving additional revenue streams to operators, manufacturers and ISVs as new services and applications become available.

http://tinyurl.com/phmdgz

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 16-Sep-09 10:30:49
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WHY THE WiMAX v. LTE BATTLE ISN'T A BATTLE

WiMAX.com
Rob Henshaw Proxim Wireless
09.09.09

As the industry continues to pit WiMAX against LTE in an epic battle for 4G supremacy, we must realise that the 4G future is not an either/or proposition.

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote about one of the many applications that WiMAX is being used for today - wireless video surveillance - that go beyond the traditional application of 4G wireless access that most people expect WiMAX to be used for. I mentioned that I'd be covering other WiMAX applications (besides 4G access) in the weeks to come, and I will pick that up again next week - but this week I wanted to address an ongoing conversation that has been taking place in the industry, as well as here on the digital pages of WiMAX.com. And that conversation is the "WiMAX vs. LTE" debate.

This is a topic that I've written about before in the April 2009 WiMAX Guide, but after seeing the topic resurface in the WiMAX360º forum it was clear that people still have many differing opinions on this topic. In fact, if you do a quick Google search on the term "WiMAX vs. LTE" it returns well over 3 million results, a clear sign that there is no shortage of opinions on the so-called battle that exists between these two next-generation (4G) technologies.

You don't have to look hard to find a breakdown of the carriers and vendors that have pledged their support to one technology over the other, and analysis on how these organisations' support will affect the future of these technologies. Everyone is pitting the two technologies against each other in what they would have you believe is an epic battle for the future of wireless networks - but there's just one problem.

The WiMAX vs. LTE "battle" isn't a battle at all.

Neither of these technologies will emerge as victorious over the other, and neither will be forced to accept a role as the "also-ran" in the annals of tech history. In fact, both WiMAX and LTE can and likely will play equally important roles in the future of wireless networks. At one point I hypothesised that those roles would be "access" and "backhaul" - with LTE providing the access technology of choice and WiMAX providing an ideal backhaul technology for 4G networks. But I no longer think that WiMAX and LTE need to be pigeonholed into those exclusive categories.

Today, it seems as though both technologies will become viable 4G access technologies, while WiMAX still maintains its position as an ideal backhaul technology as well. Now, some will claim that either WiMAX or LTE must win from an access perspective, but more and more, that does not seem to be the case.

Take into consideration that, with the endorsement of North America's two largest carriers and the GSM carriers around the world, LTE certainly seems to be "winning" when it comes to providing the future of wireless access. Many viewed this as the nail in the coffin for WiMAX as a 4G access technology. But lo and behold, earlier this month Clearwire rolled out WiMAX services in 10 new markets (bringing the total markets served to 14) and then announced that they would expand service to 10 more markets before the end of 2009.

Suddenly, WiMAX networks were no longer the "long awaited myths" that they once were, and they became a viable option for millions of people in 14 markets. Not only that, but the reviews have started pouring out of those 14 markets from users who love the service, adding even more fuel to the WiMAX fire. The momentum that WiMAX had lost seems to be gradually building again, and it can all be chalked up to one thing - availability.

The simple fact of the matter is that the reason WiMAX began losing momentum and favor is because it had been hyped for so long without any AVAILABLE networks to speak of. People got tired of hearing about WiMAX, and actually wanted to use WiMAX. Now that the first 14 networks are available and people are happy with the service, WiMAX has regained the favour of the public. If these networks continue to roll out on the schedule Clearwire has announced, then that favor will likely continue to grow. If they fail to keep up the new market introductions, do not be surprised to see the market turn its back on WiMAX again.

Now, the interesting thing is that LTE - thus far - has had a relatively smooth ride when it comes to public opinion. Due to the early support from some of the large carriers, LTE was met with great fanfare. But what many people fail to see is that LTE is doomed to the same exact fate as WiMAX when it comes to public favour and opinion. LTE is still in the honeymoon phase where the market is still enamoured with the possibilities. But eventually, the market is going to get tired of talking about LTE, and they are going to want to start connecting via LTE. Considering the estimates for LTE rollouts are currently pegged at 2012, I would wager that public favour for LTE will wane - just as it did for WiMAX - before the networks are even deployed.

And the reason will be exactly the same - availability. People can only be expected to be enamoured with something for so long without experiencing it. Boatloads of bad press and public complaints will likely ensue for LTE, just as it did for WiMAX, because the industry and the public will want to get their hands on what they've been promised for the last couple of years. But just as the ailment of the bad publicity and lack of momentum for LTE in the years to come will be the same as that faced by WiMAX, so too is the remedy. Once LTE networks become available and people fall in love with the service, the tides will change and LTE will become hot again.

So what does this mean for the current "WiMAX vs. LTE" debate? Well, by the time LTE networks are deployed, WiMAX (if the networks continue to be deployed at the current rate) will already have a large installed base that will have been using the service for 1-3 years. Now, that does not meant that WiMAX will have "won", because WiMAX will still not be available in all markets, whereas LTE (being deployed by the larger carriers) will likely be available in more markets overall. Which leads me to my earlier conclusion - NEITHER technology actually "wins", because the 4G future is not an either/or proposition (either WiMAX or LTE).

In some locations, people will only have access to WiMAX for 4G access. In others, they will only have the option of LTE for 4G access. And in some locations, (in 2012-2013), consumers will be lucky enough to have the option to chose either WiMAX or LTE networks. In those cases, just as we see with today's 3G networks, people will make their choices based on which provider they trust most or which service they've received the best recommendations for - but it is highly unlikely that either will displace each other.

And the fact of the matter is, even if WiMAX does not become the next wireless access technology of choice, it would still has a very important role to play as a backhaul technology for both 4G and Wi-Fi networks worldwide. WiMAX was originally designed as a wireless backhaul technology to begin with, and it is especially well suited for that task.

Just as neither WiMAX or LTE have displaced or will displace the use of Wi-Fi (due the widespread adoption and level of consumer comfort with Wi-Fi), the "WiMAX vs. LTE" comparison is not an either/or proposition. WiMAX is already being used around the world as an ideal wireless backhaul technology for bandwidth intensive applications such as wireless video surveillance, traffic synchronisation, and more - and it will continue to be used for that exact purpose, as well as the backhaul technology for wireless voice and data networks. So, as LTE networks begin to roll out, it is extremely likely that WiMAX technologies will also be used as the wireless backhaul for those networks, while LTE provides the access. And as advances are made in high-performance outdoor Wi-Fi, again, WiMAX will play a key role as the backhaul.

As an industry, it's important to do away with the sensational language that paints a picture of a one-technology 4G future. Instead, let us focus on how the existing (and future) wireless technologies will work together, and realise that there are significant, varied and non-exclusive market opportunities for both WiMAX and LTE.

http://tinyurl.com/nxstsb

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 21-Sep-09 13:29:55
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
AT&T: HSPA FEMTOCELL COMING

dailywire.org

Sam Churchill 18.09.09

AT&T is set to unveil a 3G femtocell, reports Unstrung. AT&T’s Microcell is expected to reach select U.S. markets including Atlanta, San Antonio, Seattle and North Carolina in the next week.

Microcell will support high speed data, unlike competing femtocells from Verizon and Sprint.

AT&T has been conducting field trials of 3G Microcell in several test markets, with nation-wide rollout expected by the end of 2009.

Femtocells are like Wi-Fi access points, but use licensed cellular frequencies to connect to phones. Your DSL or cable modem service supplies the backhaul (saving cellular companies money).

Femtocells provide unlimited in-home voice calling since it’s not going through a cell tower, and can supply better reception inside a building.

Sprint Nextel became the first carrier in the world to commercially offer femtocell with the launch of the $99 AIRAVE box in August 2008. Verizon launched its femtocell product in early 2009.

But Verizon and Sprint don’t support 3G data applications. They work with 2G handsets.

3G Microcell supports up to ten 3G capable cellular handsets and is designed for both voice calls and data applications. AT&T has yet to disclose the pricing or manufacturer of their 3G access point. Unstrung says Cisco has been linked with an AT&T femtocell for over a year, but neither company has yet officially confirmed the partnership.

Continuous Computing currently supports 3G HSPA technology and their roadmap targets an LTE femtocell, too. They are a member of the Femto Forum.

AT&T is deploying HSPA on its 850 MHz spectrum to increase capacity in Atlanta, New York City and Houston. “We have seen immediate improvement when we turned up 850 MHz,” said Kris Rinne, VP of architecture and planning at AT&T.

But contrary to earlier reports, Rinne said they had no plans to migrate to HSPA+ at this time. Instead the second largest cellular carrier in the USA is deploying HSPA 7.2 throughout its network and plans to have the upgrade in place, in 90% of its 3G footprint, by the end of 2011.

Ivan Seidenberg, CEO of Verizon Communications, said the company was simply no longer concerned with telephones that are connected with wires. Verizon is selling off most of its operations in rural areas and is spending billions to wire most of the rest of its territory with its fibre optic (FiOS) network.

FiOS uses the de-centralised structure of the Internet rather than the traditional design of phone systems, which route all traffic through a tree of regional, then local offices.

See Link for explanatory diagrams:-

http://www.dailywireless.org/2009/09/18/att-hspa-fem...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 28-Sep-09 12:34:57
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
INNOVATIVE ANTENNA DESIGN IMPROVES PERFORMANCE IN MOBILE DEVICES

WiMAX.com
09.09.09

With shrinking form factors and multiple antenna technologies, device manufactures are utilising new approaches to increase performance and reduce costs. Interview with Joe Gifford, Vice President at SkyCross.

While sometimes taken for granted, antenna design is becoming increasingly important in the successful design of mobile devices and handsets. This has become even more profound in recent years with the growing number of technologies packed into smaller form-factors, each with different frequencies and some using multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) technologies.

The antenna is important since it is the only structure in a mobile device that communicates directly with the network. How these structures are designed and where they are placed inside a device can have a big impact on how the device performs.

But designing MIMO into smaller devices comes with its own unique challenges. With multiple antennas, more space is typically needed to ensure that the multiple antennas operate without interfering with each other. This problem can become even more challenging when working with technologies that operate in close proximity - such as WiMAX at 2.5GHz and Wi-Fi at 2.4GHz.

SkyCross has solved this problem with its iMATTM technology (short for isolated mode antenna technology) which enables a single antenna to function like multiple antennas, without compromising the performance of each antenna or the industrial design of the device. This is accomplished by using a single radiating structure with multiple feed points.

The company, founded in 2000, provides a complete host of antenna solutions for the mobile phone, home entertainment and computing industries. The company considers itself more of a solutions company that can apply a wide variety of technologies depending on the needs of its customers.

"Many of our solutions are specific to each customer device," says Joe Gifford, Vice President at SkyCross. "The product we develop is customer specific with SkyCross technology and techniques used in an 'artistically' developed way to solve each customer's problem."

The company is active in a number of technologies, including 802.11n and the next generation of IEEE standards. This year alone the company will ship 120 million antennas in a variety of different market segments.

In the WiMAX space, the company works with all the major players and even includes Intel as one of its investors (the only antenna company that Intel has an investment in). Last year, SkyCross technology was included in Airspan's MiMAX Quad-Band USB dongle - the first WiMAX Forum certified USB device and winner of several industry awards. The device was certified to operate in the 2.5GHz band, but is also designed to operate in every frequency from 2.3GHz to 5.9 GHz.

SkyCross technology was included in one of the first WiMAX CPEs on Sprint's Xohm network in Baltimore and was selected by WiMAX operator VMAX in Taiwan for use in their USB dongle. SkyCross was also recently selected as the antenna provider for several devices on the UQ Communications network in Japan and the Clearwire network in the United States.

"We have developed the technology that sits on the reference design of WiMAX chip companies such as Samsung, Beceem, Sequans, GCT and others," says Gifford. "Some of those reference designs are then included in products produced by Novatel, Sierra Wireless and Huawei."

The company also considers the RF approach that it takes in designing the electrical-mechanical radiating device as part of its key advantage. "When people think of an antenna, they typically think of a radiating metal device that you put in a device," says Gifford. "With our approach, we develop some type of electrical-mechanical radiating property, it could be anything as inexpensive as possible, and we use that to excite the entire device that it is going into. For example, with a USB dongle, we can get the entire device to radiate."

From a cost/performance perspective, the company claims that its iMAT technology can cut the cost in half and boost performance and efficiencies 2X when compared to traditional technologies. With today's smaller devices, operating at higher frequencies and non-line of site environments, these performance gains can be significant - improving the subscribers experience while on the network and reducing overall network costs.

Operators such as Clearwire have taken notice and are influencing the design of handsets by insisting that suppliers consider using SkyCross. "We have been working with Clearwire, and they liked what they saw in the performance metrics," says Gifford. "We do a great job, especially in small form factors and can improve the antenna performance significantly compared to other traditional solutions."

http://tinyurl.com/y8kh7kn

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 29-Sep-09 22:58:06
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
XANADOO SELECTS ALIANZA SOLUTION FOR VOIP OVER WiMAX

WiMAXian
22.09.09

The explosion of WiMAX networks and services is expected to accelerate the deployment of VoIP services as high-speed Internet access allows better quality of voice and multimedia services.

VoIP service over WiMAX, in particular has flourished among Telcos because it can significantly increase subscriber reach to locations that were previously cost prohibitive.

On the 30th September 2008 DigitalBridge Communications (DBC) announced the first commercially available VoIP services over a WiMAX network in the U.S. DBC extended voice service to 15 markets in:- Idaho, Indiana, Montana, South Dakota, Virginia and Wyoming.

Clearwire also provide CLEAR Voice that their costumer can talk as long as it takes (with unlimited local and long distance calling) to anywhere in the US, Canada and Puerto Rico.

Recently Xanadoo selected Alianza, Inc., the leading provider of hosted voice-over WiMAX solutions, to power its new residential and small business voice offering.

Xanadoo was one of the first WiMAX providers in the U.S. Launched in 2006, Xanadoo provides innovative, mobile broadband solutions to multiple cities in Texas, Oklahoma and Illinois. These cities are:-

Lubbock (TX) - covered POP’s 247,000.
Abilene (TX) - covered POP’s 162.000.
Wichita Falls (TX) - covered POP’s 154,000,
Lawton (OK) - covered POP’s 186,000.

In early 2009, Xanadoo launched its first 4G markets in Springfield and Decatur (IL) - covered POP’s 381,000, with plans to expand 4G into current and future markets.

Back in the first years, Xanadoo operated Navini Networks-based pre-WiMAX networks.
In October 2007 Cisco acquired Navini Networks, Inc. a leader in the Mobile WiMAX 802.16e-2005 broadband wireless industry.

Navini was a pioneer in the integration of “Smart Beamforming” technologies with Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) antennas, a combination that improves the performance and range for WiMAX services and lowers the overall deployment and operational costs for service providers.

Navini has a complete WiMAX portfolios that makes wireless broadband personal. Such as WiMAX modem, wireless broadband access card, powerful base transceiver station (BTS), antenna systems, and robust EMS.

Navini’s WiMAX products will extend Cisco’s market-leading WiFi and WiFi-Mesh portfolios, allowing Cisco to uniquely address the rapidly growing markets for broadband wireless services.

Xanadoo has utilised Cisco Internet Protocol Next-Generation Network (IP NGN) infrastructure to launch one of the first commercial North American mobile WiMAX broadband wireless networks. Xanadoo was the only North American WiMAX network operator to be selected as a designated Cisco powered partner.

Actually Navini and ASUS developed certified Mobile WiMAX subscriber modems which were marketed under Navini’s Ripwave brand. These modems used chips from several vendors and supported key Mobile WiMAX features such as Beamforming and MIMO Matrix A (Space-Time Coding).

Navini Networks Ripwave MX Modem and Ripwave Wireless Broadband Access Card are now available as Xanadoo WiMAX modem and WiMAX PCMCIA card for notebook.

Currently Xanado provides a Double Play package - the Internet & Phone plan for $44.90/month featuring :

* Reliable and crystal-clear phone service with unlimited local and long distance calling.
* Get 8 additional calling features like Caller ID, Call Waiting, Call Forwarding and Enhanced
Digital Voice Mail for no additional cost.
* Plus, you can keep your current phone and phone number.

Xanadoo's new Alianza-powered Digital Voice product offers crystal-clear, reliable phone service with unlimited local and long distance calling for only $24.95 and is now available in its Illinois and Oklahoma markets, with plans to expand to additional markets later this year

http://tinyurl.com/ykeyyxr

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 06-Oct-09 11:46:58
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
I used to work in Transportation, so find this item to be of particular interest.

HOW DOES US EXPERIENCE WITH HIGHWAY NETWORKS COMPARE TO BROADBAND?

WiMAX.com

Fred B. Campbell Jr. 23.09.09.

Broadband infrastructure, sometimes called the "Internet highway," has long been analogised to the nation’s highways. So what does America’s experience with building the nation’s roads tell us about broadband, especially mobile broadband?

Yesterday, Art Brodsky said in the Public Knowledge Blog that not being “allowed to play favourites” has been part of transportation for 100 years. And in the Commission’s recent report on rural broadband, the National Highway System (“NHS”) was used as an example of America’s ability to overcome its infrastructure challenges. However, “favourites” are played on the nation’s roadways and the NHS includes only 4% of the nation’s roads.

So what does America’s experience with building the nation’s roads tell us about broadband, especially mobile broadband? (I note that Anna-Maria Kovacs at Regulatory Source Associates did a similar piece yesterday, but I explore different aspects of the analogy below.)

Guaranteed Speed.
Like mobile wireless systems, the roadways are a shared infrastructure. Although a highway may be designed to handle traffic “up to” 55 mph, during rush hour traffic often slows considerably – and in many cities slows to a standstill. The available speed of travel on a typical highway changes throughout the day depending on the level of demand at any given point in time. It also changes throughout the week – holiday weekends are often busier than non-holiday weekends. This is the nature of inherently shared networks, which may explain why transportation engineers don’t provide “guaranteed” speeds.

Traffic Management.

That doesn’t mean that transportation engineers stand idly by when traffic congestion threatens the usability of a particular road. Transportation engineers have devised numerous ways of dealing with traffic congestion.

A common method is to limit use of certain lanes or even the entire road at certain times to certain vehicles – i.e., “high occupancy vehicles” or “HOV”, which often includes motorcycles or vehicles using hybrid technology. Thus, a driver’s choice of vehicle may dictate whether, when, and how that driver may use certain roadways. In other words, a driver of a “gas hog” may be excluded from a particular roadway, even if that driver has excellent reasons for using that type of vehicle (e.g., an accessible van driven by a person with disabilities or a low-income driver that cannot afford a more modern alternative that would qualify for HOV privileges).

Traffic engineers are also increasingly using “congestion pricing” to reduce traffic congestion during peak demand. In some instances, a fee is charged for using HOV lanes, which are known as “high occupancy toll” or “HOT” lanes. Another form of congestion pricing is to reduce existing toll rates outside the hours of peak demand.

Some oppose government traffic management methodologies on the grounds of discrimination. The National Motorists Association (“NMA”) argues that drivers should have “complete access to all public streets, roads, and highways, free of arbitrary restrictions, exorbitant fees, or governmental attempts to dictate personal travel choices.” For example, according to the NMA, HOV rules that allow certain vehicle types inherently discriminate among drivers based on their choice of vehicle. But such opposition has not eliminated the use of HOV restrictions by government officials, who recognise the very real challenges of traffic management.

Financing Construction.
Transportation engineers also use various methods to fund new construction, although tax dollars are the most common method of funding roadway construction and maintenance. However, some highways are built and maintained using a form of metered pricing, for example toll roads, which may charge according to distance travelled, building and maintenance costs and type of vehicle.

When building its roadway system, the United States also took into account differences between sparsely populated rural areas and more densely populated urban areas. The United States does not offer the same types of roads to both urban and rural areas. According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, approximately 35 percent of the roads in the United States are still unpaved. When balancing the costs and benefits of building paved roads to every house in America, the United States has decided that the benefits of paved roads are outweighed by their cost in many rural areas.

Fees for Heavy Users.
Due to the additional congestion and impact on road surfaces caused by the trucking industry, it is not surprising that the trucking industry pays additional taxes and tolls for use of the nation’s roadways. All federal trucking industry taxes are earmarked for the Federal Highway Trust Fund (“HTF”). The HTF was designed as a user-supported fund, and it is the primary source of revenue for the interstate highway system and various other federal-aid highway programs. Although all users pay into the fund through fuel taxes, diesel fuel used by the commercial trucking industry is taxed at a higher rate than gasoline (diesel is 24.4 cents per gallon compared to gasoline’s 18.4 cents per gallon). Commercial tires are similarly taxed at a higher rate than non-commercial tires. Perhaps most relevant to the broadband analogy, is the Federal Heavy Vehicle Use Tax, which is imposed on all vehicles with a gross weight of more than 25Te and federal excise taxes, which are imposed on all new tractor and trailer purchases. Thus, where our highways are concerned, the federal government has expressly embraced the idea that heavy users of a shared resource should pay more for that use.

Mobile Wireless.
Mobile wireless network engineers face many of the same challenges that confront transportation officials. Like America’s roadways, mobile wireless networks are shared infrastructure subject to congestion that must be managed through various techniques, including through limitations on certain types of applications (wireless “HOV” restrictions) and congestion pricing. Also like roadways, broadband networks are costly to build, especially in rural areas. Just as rural America has been connected largely with unpaved roads, mobile wireless technologies are a more cost-effective solution for rural areas than fibre to the home. And, like the Federal government does with the commercial trucking industry, it makes sense to charge particularly heavy users of mobile networks more than typical users.

Comment Posted by Robert Syputa. 05.10.09:
Fred- Good analogy, but it has its limits.

Unlike a hardtop roadway, the information age superhighway is also the instrument that is harnessed to enable innovation. Information industry (superhighways) enable a "Moore's Law" phenomena to occur: productivity, personal and social values are expanded to deliver increased capacity at ever lower cost.

While networks must be made secure, managed, and within a reasonable time self-funding, they also must be open to the dynamic change needed.

Legitimate points of view at the heart of the FCC initiation of new rules setting centre on the basic conflicts between capitalisation, legacy business, and harnessing and not being crushed by the opening of innovation.
At the heart of this is how QoS maps to services and network management: 3G broadband has limited QoS and even lesser active management. Gross level exclusion was not sanctioned under prior rulings. The transparency of 'open development' platforms and apps certification and commercial (store) policies, cuts to core antitrust principles. The new rulings should make this clear across wireless broadband, cable, DSL, fibre and HFX networks.

Even it the FCC were not following on top of industry changes with clarification of new rule setting, commercial developments are pressing more open applications and devices that shape the information superhighway WBB network development.

Case in point: If AT&T had not grabbed the iPhone tiger by its tail they may not have met such rapid rise in BB demand that it has forced upgrades and higher density deployment of HSPA. The exclusive agreement has led to rapid growth in subscribers and bandwidth demand but a corresponding surrender of brand and market control.

Apple is an IT/PC company and broadband, particularly IP broadband is a highway with an open, a user derived applications environment and use characteristics.

"You don't make an omelette without first breaking a few eggs."

http://tinyurl.com/yawtzk2

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 08-Oct-09 22:29:59
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
U.N. REPORT: MOBILE BROADBAND OVERTAKING FIXED LINE

CIO TODAY

Frank Jordans 07.10.09

Two next-generation technologies are potential nails in the coffin for fixed-line broadband. The first is LTE, or long-term evolution, which cell phone companies are considering as the replacement for 3G some years down the line. In the other corner is WiMAX, a standard that works like Wi-Fi but over much greater distances.

More people are using cell phones and other portable devices for high-speed Web access than are signing up for fixed line subscriptions to the Net, according to U.N. figures published Tuesday.

Mobile broadband subscriptions are expected to reach 600 million, leapfrogging the estimated 500 million fixed line subscriptions by the end of this year, the International Telecommunication Union said.

"There was a 50 percent increase in mobile broadband subscriptions just over the past year," said Susan Teltscher of ITU's statistical bureau.

The agency expects growth to continue at this rate for several years, she said.

Most mobile broadband connections are still considerably slower than fixed line alternatives, and offer a more limited range of services at a higher price. Experts say that competitive advantage could soon tilt in mobile's favor, too.

Industry representatives at ITU's Telecom World trade show in Geneva this week are touting two next-generation technologies as potential nails in the coffin for fixed-line broadband.

The first is LTE, or long-term evolution, which cell phone companies are considering as the replacement for 3G some years down the line.

In the other corner is WiMAX, a standard being pushed by the computer industry that works like Wi-Fi but over much greater distances.

Russia-based company Yota unveiled a dual-use phone Tuesday that runs on both WiMAX and standard cell phone networks. Users can browse the Web at ultrahigh speeds in those Russian cities already covered by Yota, or connect at slower cell phone speeds elsewhere, chief executive Denis Sverdlov said.

U.S. rival Clearwire Corp. meanwhile announced a foray into the Spanish market with plans to provide city-wide WiMAX in Malaga and Seville. Clearwire's Barry West said the Kirkland, Washington-based company will eventually offer voice services, a move that is likely to irk European cell carriers whose business still relies heavily on voice for the greater part of their income.

The biggest winners from the emergence of mobile broadband are likely to be poor countries. Fixed-line phones are still scarce in the developing world, forcing those who want high-speed data Relevant Products/Services services to resort to mobile technology.

Voice-only mobile subscriptions already outstrip the number of regular phone connections in most poor countries: almost seven in 10 people around the world now have a cell phone subscription of some kind, the ITU report found.

Meanwhile, fixed line telephone subscriptions continue to decline and are expected to drop to about 1.1 billion -- less than one for every five people on the planet -- this year, the report said.

© 2009 Associated Press under contract with YellowBrix. All rights reserved.

http://tinyurl.com/yl6dn79

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 12-Oct-09 12:17:32
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Two versions of the same story.

WiMAX v LTE-A: BATTLE FOR THE 4G WIRELESS STANDARD RAMPS UP

ITWire

Stuart Corner 07.10.09

The battle between the Cellular and WIMAX camps for future 4G wireless networking standards ramped up this week, with the IEEE formally submitting its 802.16m standard (the next iteration of today's 802.16e mobile WiMAX) to the ITU, as a candidate radio interface technology for IMT-Advanced standardisation.

To clear up any confusion -- the widespread use of the term '4G' by both WiMAX and Cellular (LTE) camps, to designate their current mobile technologies as 4G, is a misnomer -- officially IMT-advanced will be the first 4G wireless technology. The goals being to support peak data rates of 100Mbps for high mobility and 1Gbps for low mobility.

Opinions differ on outcomes -- LTE and 802.16e are jointly supported (since both are specified in the current IMT-2000 standard), or the technologies might converge, or one will triumph over the other.

According to IEEE, the 802.16m 'Advanced Air Interface' specification (under development by the IEEE 802.16 Working Group on Broadband Wireless Access) "meets ITU-R’s challenging and stringent requirements, in all four IMT-Advanced 'environments' -- indoor, micro-cellular, urban, and high speed." The proposal will be presented at the 3rd Workshop on IMT-Advanced in Dresden on 15 October, in conjunction with a meeting of ITU-R Working Party 5D.

The WiMAX Forum along with 50 companies, have endorsed the IEEE’s submission of 802.16m as a candidate for IMT-Advanced. The WiMAX Forum also said it would finalise its WiMAX Release2 specification in parallel with IEEE 802.16m and IMT-Advanced, "ensuring that WiMAX Release2 networks and devices will remain backward compatible with legacy WiMAX Release1, based on IEEE 802.16e." The WiMAX Forum expects to see WiMAX Release2 available commercially in the 2011-2012 timeframe.

Ron Resnick, president of the WiMAX Forum, said "There is a broad ecosystem ready to deliver WiMAX as the first IMT-Advanced compliant technology. One of our top priorities is to bring WiMAX Forum Certified Release2 networks and devices, to market by the end of 2011. Even better, with double digit WiMAX deployment growth every month, the next release of WiMAX will have an even more substantial installed base, upon which to build."

http://www.itwire.com/content/view/28306/127/9


WiMAX VS. LTE: THE REMATCH

UNSTRUNG

Michelle Donegan 07.10.09

Think the battle between WiMAX and Long Term Evolution (LTE) is over? Think again.
The WiMAX and LTE camps are rallying forces again to win the hearts and minds of operators for future mobile broadband networks. This time, the wireless groups are competing for acceptance at the International Telecommunication Union, Radio-communication Sector (ITU-R) as the primary standard for IMT-Advanced (that's 4G to you and me).

Today is an important deadline for documents to be submitted to the ITU-R so that the technology candidates can be considered and both the WiMAX and LTE supporters have met this deadline. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. (IEEE) has submitted documents for its candidate 802.16m (a.k.a. WiMAX Release2), and the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) has submitted documents for LTE-Advanced.

What happens next is a long evaluation process -- expected to take at least until October 2010 -- which formally kicks off at a meeting in Dresden, Germany, next Wednesday. During that time, the ITU will consider whether or not each of the technologies meets the IMT-Advanced requirements.

Both camps claim they do meet those requirements, of course.

First, to douse some of the confusion here, today's WiMAX and LTE networks are not technically 4G, strictly speaking, but since they are so commonly referred to in that way the label has stuck. (NTT DoCoMo Inc. is an exception here because it refers to its LTE network as "Super 3G.") The "real" 4G, defined by these IMT-Advanced requirements, are what the WiMAX 802.16m and LTE-Advanced camps are striving to meet.

The key characteristics of IMT-Advanced, are downlink speeds of 100 Mbit/s in the wide area with high mobility and 1 Gbit/s in low-mobility scenarios -- low latency at less than 10 millisecond roundtrip delay and very wide spectrum bandwidths of up to 100 MHz.

WiMAX grows up
At the ITU Telecom World 2009 show in Geneva this week, the WiMAX Forum has been hyping the development of 802.16m (or WiMAX Release 2.0).

And proving that the war of words isn't over, the Forum refers to WiMAX Release2 as "short-term evolution." The Forum says the technology is expected to be commercially available in the 2011-to-2012 timeframe.

The Forum claims that WiMAX Release2 can achieve 120 Mbit/s downlink and 60 Mbit/s uplink, in an urban scenario using 4x2 MIMO (Multiple-Input/Multiple-Output) on a 20MHz-wide channel.

The first operator trials of WiMAX Release2 will start next year. Russian operator Yota, announced in Geneva, that it will start to trial the 802.16m technology in late 2010 with equipment from Samsung Corporation, its sole provider of 802.16e infrastructure.

Yota CEO, Dennis Sverdlov, said at a WiMAX Forum press conference in Geneva yesterday, that 802.16m is needed for additional capacity, as Yota does not place usage limits on its customers and the use of video applications is growing.

Yota currently has 200,000 customers who, on average, download 10 gigabytes of data each month (that’s 2 petabytes of data per month going downstream, across Yota’s network) and it’s adding about 2,300 new customers each day. The operator can handle this level of traffic because it has built its own fibre backhaul network for its urban rollouts, that give each cell site 200 Mbit/s of backhaul. The operator has also started using the DragonWave Inc. microwave backhaul gear in less dense coverage areas.

Could WiMAX and LTE ever merge?
Some scuttlebutt from Geneva that has reached Unstrung's ears, involves the possible blending of WiMAX and LTE via the IMT-Advanced evaluation process. One possibility for such a technology merger could see the 802.16m standard becoming the time division duplex (TDD) version of LTE-Advanced. However, the achievement of such an outcome is considered to need more political action rather than technical work.

http://www.unstrung.com/document.asp?doc_id=182764&f...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 12-Oct-09 16:28:17
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
So what can be expected next - go for it, sit on it, or merge with Mr Li?
Better still, ask for Obama style funds to provide a service for the needy in the shires.



FREEDOM4 (DAISY) GETS WiMAX MOBILITY EXTENSION

Comms-dealer

12.10.09

Daisy Group has announced that its Freedom4 subsidiary has been granted a mobility extension by Ofcom to its 3.6GHz licence, effectively enabling Freedom4 to roll out the 802.16e WiMAX variant, supporting mobile as well as fixed broadband services. This licence change was expected, given that Ofcom had granted a similar licence amendment to UK Broadband in June 2007.

According to Philip Carse, analyst at Telecom Equity: "While there are a number of companies successfully selling WiMAX-based services to SMEs and other organisations in particular geographic areas (eg Urban Wimax in Central London, Metronet in Brighton), Freedom4's spectrum licence is national. The value of the spectrum, particularly with the new mobility extension, will only be maximised by building out a reasonably nation-wide network, providing mobile and fixed broadband services to consumers and businesses alike."

http://tinyurl.com/ygh7a7e



DAISY SET TO FLOAT FOR £200M

Comms4Business
29.06.09

British telecommunications group, Daisy Communications, is in talks over a 200 million pound ($330.5 million) flotation on London's Alternative Investment Market, the Sunday Times reported.

The company, which provides corporate telecoms to small and medium-sized companies, wants to raise cash to fund acquisitions and an announcement on the IPO could come this week, the newspaper said.

Daisy is in talks to reverse into Freedom4 Group, a telecoms minnow previously known as Pipex, the report said.

http://www.comms4business.com/news.cfm?Newsmonth=Jun...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 14-Oct-09 22:52:05
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
UQ LAUNCHES WiMAX SERVICE POWERED BY MFORMATION MOBILE DEVICE MANAGEMENT

ITBackbones

Joanna Vos Spark Communications 13.10.09

Mformation enabling activation and management of WiMAX-based devices and services for the Japanese marketplace

Mformation® Technologies Inc., the market leader in advanced mobile device management (MDM) software, today announced that UQ has successfully launched its WiMAX service, which is powered by the MFORMATION SERVICE MANAGER™ device management platform. Mformation is providing seamless MDM capabilities for WiMAX-capable mobile devices as part of the rollout of UQ’s WiMAX-based services. The UQ venture includes KDDI and Intel Corp. UQ expects to cover all major cities by the end of 2010 and aims to provide WiMAX coverage to 90% of the country by 2012.

Advanced MDM ensures that capable devices can be remotely activated and provisioned irrespective of their source, ensuring that they deliver an enhanced mobile Internet experience. “Advanced MDM is fundamental to ensuring that our WiMAX services work seamlessly and provide a great user experience,” said Toshikazu Yokai of UQ Communications. “The Mformation solution was important to our overall strategy to support live commercial WiMAX services. Under a tight deadline, the MDM solution has been delivered to power the WiMAX service. The ability to remotely activate, manage and support any WiMAX device — regardless of where it is purchased — will create a compelling proposition for users and a truly open mobile marketplace, allowing customers to purchase their own devices and activate them where, when and how they choose.”

WiMAX will deliver a significant boost to the mobile Internet, allowing users to access advanced data applications and personal content from anywhere in the WiMAX coverage area, on any WiMAX-enabled device at broadband speed. Mformation has built up significant experience of supporting devices over all-IP 4G technologies with unparalleled device support — more than 2,500 different devices across any mobile network type. Mformation’s experience with the OMA DM protocol are especially critical to the seamless management of WiMAX-based devices, using this protocol, to ensure that devices in the hands of subscribers are always configured and working optimally.

“Delivery to UQ under a very tight deadline, required seamless co-ordination between CTC and Mformation.” said Junichi Maruta, General Manager, Telecom Systems Planning Division of CTC, which is undertaking the systems integration role for this programme.

“Working with UQ on this very important mobile broadband initiative, is great validation of the power of our comprehensive MDM platform,” said Mark Edwards, CEO for Mformation. “UQ Communications had very demanding requirements; we have consistently demonstrated our ability to support these requirements as UQ moves forward with its aggressive plans for rollout of WiMAX-based services.”

www.mformation.com

http://www.itbinternet.com/pr/33434?

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 19-Oct-09 15:34:12
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Daisy, UKB & HMG, please take note.

FIXED WIRELESS CONTINUES TO THRIVE IN THE BACKGROUND

WiMAX.com

Robb Henshaw 13.10.09

While Clearwire's recent deployments have dominated the WiMAX headlines and re-ignited the public's enthusiasm for mobile WiMAX, fixed wireless continues to thrive in the background, especially with the broadband stimulus' focus on rural broadband.

When you think of WiMAX, what's the first thing that comes to your mind? Is it the ability to connect with your laptop or a WiMAX-enabled smartphone to a mobile network at much higher speeds than today's 3G networks? Or do you think of WiMAX's role as a fixed wireless technology, which is key to cost-effectively extending broadband service to under-served rural areas as part of the U.S. broadband stimulus?

If we look at the amount of attention that is paid to the two different deployment types - mobile and fixed - in the media, it would indicate that people are far more excited about mobile WiMAX than they are about fixed wireless.

Now that Clearwire has launched WiMAX service in 14 markets and people have actually been able to experience the service, enthusiasm for WiMAX has spiked yet again after waning in previous years. I've written about the hype cycle for WiMAX before, and while I do think that the market's latest wave of enthusiasm for WiMAX is justified (since it is based on positive experience with deployed networks, instead of just the promise of these networks), there is a distinction that needs to be made when it comes to the future of WiMAX. That distinction is the difference in opportunities for mobile WiMAX as compared to fixed WiMAX and other point-to-multi point wireless technologies.

Don't get me wrong - I think that both mobile WiMAX (IEEE 802.16e) and fixed WiMAX (802.16d) both have a large addressable market and ample market opportunities. This is not an article about which is more important. However, considering the fact that a vast majority of the attention given to WiMAX is given to the mobile variants of WiMAX, it's worth taking a look at the market opportunity for fixed wireless systems as well.

The Dark Horse is Already Out of the Shadows

While mobile WiMAX may be the more popular, sexy sibling of the WiMAX family, fixed WiMAX actually has a larger share of the market today. According to Gartner, the total fixed WiMAX deployments were more than double that of mobile WiMAX deployments in 2008 - and their projections are similar throughout 2011. Though mobile WiMAX continues to gain steam with Clearwire's U.S. rollouts (and now their planned Spanish deployment next year), fixed WiMAX continues to be a larger market by a factor of nearly 2x.

The reason for this is largely due to the significant role that fixed wireless plays in the deployment of broadband to rural areas. In Gartner's reports, it classifies the "fixed" applications of WiMAX as "DSL Reach Extension", "Developing Region Broadband" and "Backhaul for Mesh and Cellular" - illustrating that extending the reach of broadband services via wireless (and therefore eliminating the high cost of fibre) is a primary application for fixed WiMAX.

And that brings us to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), which has earmarked $7.2 billion for the specific purpose of extending broadband to rural areas - what we all refer to as the "Broadband Stimulus". Though technologies like fixed WiMAX and other fixed point-to-multi point (PtMP) wireless technologies were already gaining significant ground and represent nearly double the market opportunity of mobile WiMAX today, the broadband stimulus is expected to provide an even greater spike in the demand for fixed wireless.

One of the major reasons for this is because of the significant cost benefits of wireless over wired technologies. Craig Mathias, principal analyst at the Farpoint Group, recently explored this in a report titled "Wireline vs. Wireless: Exploring Total Cost of Ownership in Outdoor Applications." In this report, Mathias notes:

"CapEx [of wired deployments] can obviously be so enormous as to be completely cost-prohibitive - running broadband cables outdoors, especially if they are to be buried underground, is ferociously expensive. While the wire itself is not expensive, the planning, legal work, and physical installation are. For this reason, wired broadband service is usually desirable only when appropriate cable already exists, or when a carrier or utility is planning to install broadly-deployed service. Moreover, changes and additions to the installation can similarly be very expensive indeed. Break even and payback analysis requires a long timeframe often stretching into decades."

To illustrate the cost benefits of wireless, the report goes on to highlight two deployments that recognised huge cost savings by utilising wireless instead of wired technology. The second deployment that he highlights is a classic example of fixed wireless' utility for rural broadband. The deployment took place in one of England's most rural communities, ALSTON MOOR, where the 2,500 residents had not had any access to broadband services until 2002. They deployed an unlicensed fixed WiMAX network, which now provides high-speed broadband to the entire town's population. The report then compares the cost of what it would take to extend broadband to the remote town via wired technologies, and concluded that fixed wireless saved them over $700,000 in up front capital expenses alone! That doesn't even take into consideration the amount that would be saved by avoiding monthly leased line costs, too.
http://www.eweekeurope.co.uk/news/yorkshire-s-cyberm...

Where Broadband Extension and Fiscal Responsibility Meet

So, what does all this cost savings talk have to do with the expansion of the fixed wireless/WiMAX market moving forward? Down economy aside, when issuing RFPs, most organisations are going to highly favour any technology that can offer the desired level of service at the lowest cost. With all the advances in the performance of WiMAX and PtMP technologies over the years, fixed wireless systems have proven time and again that they can deliver true, carrier-grade high-speed broadband to hard-to-reach areas at a fraction of the cost of wired technologies, which has greatly aided the sales of fixed wireless systems throughout the world.

And now with $7.2 billion in stimulus money to be distributed for the expansion of rural broadband throughout the U.S., that cost savings of fixed wireless over wired becomes even more of a competitive differentiator. Due to the scrutiny that these broadband stimulus applications are put under to ensure that the billions of dollars in government funding is spent wisely, fixed wireless' balance of high-performance broadband and fiscal responsibility positions it well to be a significant winner in the broadband stimulus deployments.

So, while a majority of the press and market enthusiasm tends to put mobile WiMAX in the spotlight, we should remember to peak behind the curtain from time to time and keep tabs on the continuing success and growth of the fixed wireless market. And especially as the U.S., U.K., China and other areas of the world continue to emphasise the importance of rolling out broadband to rural areas - which could mean billions of dollars for whichever technology can most cost-effectively extend broadband to the under-served - fixed wireless may soon toss that curtain aside and steal the spotlight all on its own.

http://tinyurl.com/ylb9uhf

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Wed 21-Oct-09 12:43:26
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
FDD/TDD: WiMAX AND LTE CROSSING PATHS?

WiMAX.com

Monica Paolini - the founder and President of Senza Fili Consulting 15.10.09

At the ITU show in Geneva last week, as expected, there was a lot of talk on IMT Advanced technologies (aka 4G). At this point, both WiMAX and LTE are obvious candidates for inclusion.

The timing is still uncertain, but inclusion in IMT Advanced seems to be uncontroversial for both technologies. However, the issue around duplexing seems to be breaking down - with WiMAX using TDD (time division duplex) and LTE using FDD (frequency division duplex).

The WiMAX camp is pushing to have an FDD version of WiMAX as an IMT-2000 and as an IMT Advanced technology.

WiMAX TDD is already an IMT-2000 technology and support for FDD is included in the IEEE standard - so nothing new from a standards perspective.

Is there a market for FDD WiMAX though? Not much to date mostly because TDD is almost universally accepted by WiMAX operators as the best option for the inherently asymmetric, data traffic they have to transport.

Besides, there is currently no beamforming* solution available for FDD wireless interfaces (either WiMAX or LTE) and this constitutes an advantage for WiMAX, although one that is seldom acknowledged. So the only reason to use FDD WiMAX is linked to regulatory requirements.

Some WiMAX operators may have to use FDD in their allocated spectrum, but to date it does not seem that there are enough mobile operators to justify FDD 802.16e product development.

On the LTE side, there is a growing interest for a TDD version of LTE, mostly driven by China Mobile, but relevant to other mobile operators too, which often have TDD spectrum and do not know what to do with it.

TD-LTE is currently being tested in China by multiple vendors and chipsets are being developed by Qualcomm, Ericsson, Huawei, Sequans, Altair. TD-LTE will support MIMO as well as beam-forming. and will, like FDD LTE, use channel sizes up to 20 MHz.

A femtocell prototype from Nokia was also on display in Geneva, in the China Mobile's booth. Combing TDD and FDD chipsets in subscriber devices, will make it easier to roam across both TDD and FDD networks. With China Mobile's commitment, TD-LTE has gained needed momentum, but it remains uncertain where and how TD-LTE will be deployed in other countries.

At this stage, TD-LTE appears to have better prospects than FDD WiMAX. Interestingly, however, while not feasible for WiMAX and LTE to merge into a single standard at this point in time, there seems to be a tendency for each to crossover and move towards convergence.

http://tinyurl.com/ygl4bul

*http://www.networksystemsdesignline.com/howto/metron...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 23-Oct-09 00:36:57
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
MOBILE WIMAX AT 3.5GHZ STARTING TO TAKE OFF

WiMAX.com

Alan Weissberger 21.10.09

European operators are leveraging improvements in technology and 3.5GHz spectrum to offer true mobile WiMAX networks.

In many countries, there is an abundance of relatively inexpensive spectrum available at 3.5GHz and slightly higher frequencies. This spectrum has traditionally been used for fixed broadband wireless access, with proprietary technologies such as Motorola Canopy as well as IEEE 802.16d fixed WiMAX.

While this technology works well for fixed access, it has often been a real challenge to use these frequencies for mobility, due to propagation characteristics and to the Doppler Effect, which is more pronounced at higher frequencies above 3GHz. From a technology perspective, these shifts in frequency and wavelength result from a source moving with respect to the medium, a receiver moving with respect to the medium, or even a moving medium. As modulated symbols are transmitted, they interfere with one another creating a phenomenon known as Inter Symbol Interference, which complicates detection at the receiver, often producing an unacceptably high bit error rate.

Consequently, there has been a perception that 3.5GHz spectrum should not be used for mobility. That thinking is now changing with the rollout of several 3.5GHz mobile WiMAX networks in Europe. If 3.5GHz can be effectively used to deploy IEEE 802.16e mobile WiMAX networks, then operators could provide both fixed/nomadic as well as mobile broadband access to subscribers at a lower cost than at 2.5 GHz and lower frequencies.

Indeed, there have been several deployments and recent announcements of operators using 3.5GHz for IEEE 802.16e based WiMAX networks in Europe:

- Worldmax based in Amsterdam is using Beceem's silicon and Motorola equipment to deploy a nation-wide mobile WiMAX network in the Netherlands at 3.5GHz . The operators' service is currently deployed as a city-wide hot zone in Amsterdam and early results have been quite encouraging.

- Imagine Communication Group is deploying a nation-wide mobile WiMAX network in Ireland at 3.5GHz. The network will use Motorola's end-to-end WiMAX solution to deliver voice and high speed data services to residential and small to medium-sized enterprise customers, as well as offering mobility in city centres. Intel is partnering with Imagine to supply technology for 3.5GHz mobile WiMAX enabled notebooks and netbooks. (See below).

- Clearwire announced that it would deploy 3.5GHz mobile WiMAX in Spain next year, using RAN equipment from Alvarion and ZTE. "We intend to prove that WiMAX can work not only at 2.5GHz, but also at 3.5GHz, which is the spectrum we have in Spain" said Barry West (president of Clearwire International) at the ITU Telecom World 2009 show, in Geneva.

- UK telecom regulator Ofcom, has approved a change to the spectrum licence conditions owned by Freedom4, allowing the operator to offer mobile WiMAX services across the U.K. Freedom4 owns broadband wireless spectrum licences in the frequency band 3.6 – 4.2GHz. This decision will enable Freedom4 to add mobile WiMAX services to its existing fixed wireless access. As a result, the company will be able to directly compete with the UK's five mobile network operators. However, Freedom4 has not yet disclosed deployment timeframes or other details.

Imagine Communication's WiMAX Network

According to a fact sheet provided by Imagine Communications Group, Ireland's broadband infrastructure is struggling to keep up with the demands of its modern economy. For broadband quality, Ireland ranks in 37th place out of 66 countries and behind countries such as Estonia, Greece, Poland, and Turkey. One out of three fixed lines in Ireland cannot get broadband and four out of 10 lines can only get a maximum of only 1Mbps.

In an attempt to greatly improve Ireland's broadband infrastructure, Imagine recently announced it would invest €100 million upgrading to mobile WiMAX technology. Phase 1 - providing a new service to the main urban areas, has already commenced - due for completion in November 2010. This network will not be restricted to high-population areas, it will also be extended to smaller towns and rural communities, at a rate of 15 new WiMAX areas per month. CEO and founder of Imagine, Sean Bolger, stated that Imagine plans to cover 90% of the country with WiMAX services.

"Customers across Ireland will soon experience a leap forward in terms of broadband access and speeds. Motorola's globally renowned WiMAX solutions are quick to deploy, flexible and scalable and allow us to meet increasing demand for next-generation voice and broadband data services at home, at work and on the move," according to Bolger.

Bolger further stated that Imagine's WiMAX service will debut at 8Mbps, but is capable of reaching 17Mbps and higher speeds. According to the company's website, pricing for domestic and business consumers will be unveiled shortly. However, Bolger promises it will come at a lower price than current fixed line broadband services, predicting that it will be 50 percent cheaper than comparable Eircom products. He pointed out that line rental in the Republic (at €25.47) is 70% higher than the European average. Imagine also intends to allow other operators to wholesale its WiMAX service, although he said it had not begun negotiations with anyone.

Motorola will provide the RAN equipment as well as deployment, integration and support services to Imagine. Motorola's Head of Sales commented, "Today's announcement is very significant for Motorola - we see Ireland as being a key strategic market for mobile WiMAX, due to the digital divide and broadband deficits causing lower broadband speeds and higher prices than elsewhere in Europe," he said.

Indications suggest that these 3.5GHz mobile WiMAX deployments should be price competitive with 3G networks, while offering better performance and availability. For true mobile WiMAX, the key question is, when will embedded netbooks, notebooks, and handheld devices that work at 3.5GHz, become available? We hope that it will be as early as next year.

http://tinyurl.com/yl8d5jl

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Mon 26-Oct-09 23:50:22
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
Here it is again, trumpeted somewhat louder. Though its still pretty vague.

WiMAX BOOST in UK

3G.co.uk

26.10.09

Freedom4, the joint investment between Daisy Group plc and Intel Capital, has been granted a licence variation by Ofcom that enables it to offer mobile wireless broadband services to its customers using its nationwide 3.6GHz spectrum.

Freedom4 has already achieved the world’s first seamless mobile WiMAX handover between base stations operating at two frequencies (2.5GHz and 3.6GHz) and architected a high capacity core network, capable of delivering wholesale services. This variation gives Freedom4 the technical and regulatory flexibility to satisfy demand for fixed and mobile internet connectivity, higher bandwidth per user and the provision of broadband in areas where existing infrastructure is either weak or lacks resilience.

Mike Read (Freedom4 CEO) states, “The Company now has both the spectrum position and technical capability to implement a network and services platform ideally suited to compete in the rapidly expanding market for fixed and mobile broadband wireless access.” The latest Digital Britain publication by the UK Government (BIS) acknowledges that WiMAX is the only 4G wireless technology commercially available today and that it is being deployed across the globe.

Ashish Patel (MD Intel Capital) states, “The Government’s decision highlights the contributions WiMAX can make to the digital economy and Intel is actively supporting these efforts as a member of its Digital Participation Consortium.”

Freedom4 owns the largest contiguous block of 4G compatible spectrum currently issued in the UK, together with national spectrum at both 4GHz and 28GHz ideal for delivering wireless backhaul. Freedom4 has integrated world leading wireless network equipment and has both fixed and mobile devices to connect to its network, including the world’s only quad band WiMAX dongle.

http://www.3g.co.uk/PR/Oct2009/Wimax-Boost-in-UK-3G....

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Thu 29-Oct-09 12:00:23
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
RURAL BROADBAND ALLIANCE: SHOW US the MONEY

Daily Wireless.org

Sam Churchill 28.10.09

The (US) National Telecommunications and Information Administration, along with the Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utilities Service, is still sorting through nearly $28 billion worth of applications for broadband stimulus grants–nearly seven times the $4 billion available for the program in this first round.

NTIA head Larry Strickling said it wouldn’t be awarding the first broadband stimulus funds until December, a month later than anticipated. He also said that the agency would not conclude the first round of funding at the end of this year as they previously planned, and would instead delay that until February. In testimony before a Senate oversight committee on Tuesday, Strickling cited the complexity of sorting through the 2,200 broadband stimulus grant applications received by the agency.

In this first round of funding, NTIA will award up to $1.6 billion in grants. Of this amount, up to $1.2 billion will fund broadband infrastructure, both last mile and middle mile projects. We will also award grants totalling $50 million for public computer centre projects and $150 million for projects that promote broadband demand and affordability.

NTIA received first round applications from a diverse range of parties including State, tribal, and local governments; non-profits; industry; anchor institutions, such as libraries, universities, community colleges, and hospitals; public safety organisations; and other entities in rural, suburban, and urban areas. Working together, NTIA and RUS posted online – at www.broadbandusa.gov – a searchable database containing descriptions of all applications received, as well as maps of the geographic areas of coverage proposed by applicants in the first funding round.

NTIA was pleased to see strong participation from the small business community, especially from socially and economically disadvantaged businesses (SDBs). Of the 1,785 applications to the BTOP and joint BTOP and BIP programs, 13.9% were from SDBs or from applicants collaborating with SDBs. In this round, SDBs requested approximately $1.86 billion in federal grants and loans, with a total match commitment of $640 million. NTIA is committed to ensuring that SDBs have every opportunity to participate in this historic initiative.


Strickling said that a panel of three independent experts were evaluating each application against criteria established by the program, including the proposed project’s purpose, benefits, viability, budget and sustainability. Those scoring the highest have been moved into a due diligence review, where staff and NTIA contractor Booz Allen are further reviewing the applications.

Anna Gomez, NTIA’s deputy administrator and deputy assistant secretary for communications and information, said in a keynote address at the PCIA Wireless Infrastructure show last month that the agency hopes to have all of the grants announced by the end of the year.

The decision by the NTIA to delay the payout of the first broadband stimulus grants until December came as bad news for rural WiMAX providers counting on the funds.

According to Luisa Handem, managing director of the Rural Mobile Broadband Alliance (RuMBA USA), the delay is affecting several RuMBA-affiliated companies and will both delay and jeopardise some wireless broadband programs initiated by the group’s members.

“Money needs to be on the ground and in the hands of those deploying broadband as soon as possible,” Handem said. “This is not welcome news.”

http://www.dailywireless.org/2009/10/28/rural-broadb...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Tue 03-Nov-09 15:50:13
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
More information here about Eye which company first came to light in my previous post dated 03.09.09 - ZYXEL MAX-216M1 AVAILABLE AS WiMAX MODEM FOR 'NOW WIRELESS BROADBAND'

In that feed, I missed an interesting image on flickr dated 25.08.09 showing this kit already in use here in UK (presumably):- http://www.flickr.com/photos/ratx/3855787066/
Could Mr Ratx be one of the Reading trial sites?

Also more details about Imagine, which featured in my recent post dated 23.10.09 - MOBILE WIMAX AT 3.5GHz STARTING TO TAKE OFF



MOTOROLA CPEI 775 AVAILABLE AS WIMAX/WIFI/VOIP CPE FOR IMAGINE

WiMAXian

01.11.09

In January EyeWiMAX will debut its WiMAX service in Manchester, to offer a faster and cheaper alternative Internet access option than many ADSL packages and will soon be adding Mobile WiMAX and global roaming to the portfolio.

Manchester will become the first city in the UK to have a WiMAX network in the 3.6 GHz spectrum and implemented technology from Airspan Networks.

Recently Eye WiMAX’s supplier achieved the world’s first seamless mobile WiMAX session handover between base stations operating at two different frequencies (2.5GHz & 3.6GHz).

Working with multiple partners Airspan Networks, Starent Networks and Bridgewater Systems, EyeWiMAX will deliver the world’s first dual band city wide mobile WiMAX network in Manchester

Imagine Communications is deploying a nationwide mobile WiMAX network in Ireland at 3.5GHz. The network will use Motorola CPEi 775 to deliver voice and high speed data services to residential and small to medium-sized enterprise customers.

Motorola provided deployment, integration and support services to Imagine in addition to WiMAX equipment. This will include WiMAX Access Points such as the WAP 450 for increased coverage and capacity in a compact design and the WAP 800 with beamforming antenna techniques for enhanced performance.

For customer premises equipment Imagine will offer the USBw 100 USB modem for high speed mobile connectivity; the CPEi 775 which includes a built-in Wi-Fi router and ports for VoIP; and the CPEo 450 which extends the coverage of critical broadband and VoIP services, while reducing infrastructure and support costs.

With Motorola CPEi 775 that has built-in WiFi router, customers can now wirelessly link multiple devices to the WiFi-enabled device throughout their premises. This will also provide savings to customers as they will not be required to buy wireless routers to achieve this.

Motorola CPEi 775 is an all-in-one access device that combines a high performing WiMAX 802.16e modem with an integrated Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g router, VoIP ATA ports for voice calling, and an ethernet port.

The Motorola CPEi 775 is WiMAX Forum® Wave 2 ready and is available today in the 3.5 GHz band, with support for the 5MHz, 7MHz, and 10 MHz bandwidths. It can work with Windows, Mac and LINUX operating systems without any user intervention.

These 3.5GHz mobile WiMAX deployments are great news for the industry. Early indications suggest that these networks should be price competitive compared with 3G networks, while offering better performance and availability.

http://tinyurl.com/yelxlqh

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Sun 08-Nov-09 12:12:31
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
WILL WiMAX'S SPEED ADVANTAGE LAST LONGER THAN YOU THINK? MAYBE

UNSTRUNG

Paul Kapustka 06.11.09

After spending a couple days listening to folks from various parts of the industry at the Open Mobile Summit in San Francisco, it's pretty apparent that the big network providers -- namely, AT&T Inc. and to some extent, Verizon Communications Inc. -- were not ready for the wireless data explosion of the past couple years, and may not be prepared to handle it well in the near-term future.

What that means for WiMAX – and, specifically in the U.S. market, for Clearwire LLC and its big partners, like Sprint Nextel Corp. -- is that the speed and bandwidth edge WiMAX enjoys right now, might continue for longer than you think -- say maybe three, four years, or more.

The problem -- which is a nice one to have -- is the runaway success of platforms like the Apple Inc. iPhone, which radically changed the way people use mobile data. As Apple's exclusive provider in the U.S., AT&T gets to reap benefits like signing up 7.2 million new iPhone customers in the first nine months of 2009, a figure cited by AT&T CTO John Donovan.

The downside is the ongoing public-relations hit AT&T is taking for its problems in trying to keep all those users happy, an issue so prevalent that Verizon, its biggest competitor, feels comfortable poking fun at AT&T's network in a series of recent ads. But even as AT&T struggles to tout its ongoing efforts to accommodate iPhone users on its current network, a bigger problem looms for both Ma Bell and also, likely for Verizon -- that the providers' 4G plans, using Long Term Evolution (LTE) technology at the 700 MHz spectrum level, may prove to be inadequate as well, should mobile data consumption continue on its upward path.

"LTE does not solve the iPhone problem," said Boingo Wireless Inc. CEO Dave Hagan, speaking on a panel at the conference. While LTE might provide throughput four times greater than current 3G implementations, Hagan said the incredible jump in demand generated by devices like the iPhone will trump such low-shooting improvements.

"They are chasing a 50x increase (in data consumption) with a 4x solution, a 4x solution that's going to take four years to complete," Hagan said. "That's not going to work."

In a keynote and a panel discussion at the event on Thursday, Donovan did his best to never say that AT&T was unprepared for the iPhone tsunami -- but it was clear from some of his answers that AT&T wasn't ready (from a network perspective) for the transformation of having a portable Web platform together with the ability to load new applications, at will.

The software, Donovan said, makes it a crapshoot for AT&T to try to predict user patterns, something that was easy in the old days of locked phones. "You could have someone using 20K today and tomorrow they could become a 500K user," Donovan said. While he contended that AT&T was doing all it could as fast as it can to keep up, (under the constant grilling of moderator Walt Mossberg) he finally admitted that when the company's 3G networks were designed, the current usage pattern is "not what we had contemplated."

Even though Verizon can crow some now, if its new Android-powered smartphones take off the way the iPhone did, they too may run into similar capacity problems before long. Likewise, with the introduction of LTE, both Verizon and AT&T will only have around 25 MHz of spectrum depth at 700 MHz -- which may not be enough to handle data demand should consumption patterns continue to increase rapidly. The Clearwire/Sprint team, on the other hand, is sitting on an average of about 120 MHz of spectrum depth at 2.5 GHz -- and is already deploying networks running without the bandwidth-capping limits that are standard for 3G contracts.

As Sprint 4G VP Todd Rowley said at the event, "We're playing in the gigabit game", which begs the question:- is that a game AT&T and Verizon can join, anytime soon? Or maybe not as soon as you predicted?

http://www.unstrung.com/blog.asp?blog_sectionid=776&...

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Standard User RadioJock
(member) Fri 20-Nov-09 17:01:01
Print Post

Re: WIMAX


[re: RadioJock] [link to this post]
 
REDKITE’S GRAHAM MCLEAN - WHY WiMAX HOLDS LITTLE HOPE FOR RURAL ‘NOT-SPOTS’

Samknows Broadband News

By Sean Hargrave 20.11.09

WiMAX will not be the wireless broadband saviour for the digital have-nots, according to CI-Net Managing Director Graham McLean.

The ISP has recently expanded its RedKite WiMAX service but at £3000 per year, it is targeted at businesses which require a stable back up option to fixed line connections. It has been operational for four years, however, this month, it has been upgraded to allow companies with a 2Mb service, to enjoy ‘bursts’ of up to 20Mbps, when needed, so long as they average 2Mb across the month.

Far from being a rural not-spot filler, the service is offered in London, Croydon, Oxford, Hemel Hempstead, Birmingham, Exeter and may soon be arriving in Norwich.

“People have often talked about WiMAX helping to bring broadband to smaller market towns and villages, but I really don’t see that happening,” McLean says.

“It could do, but the economics just aren’t there. People want to get a fast wireless connection to the net and expect it to come in at around the same sort of price as ADSL. It just can’t do that, the economics aren’t there unless there are many thousands of subscribers and, of course, you’re only going to get that in a city. I’m afraid that people in the Highlands hoping to get broadband through WiMAX for £20 a month, are going to be disappointed.

“If people can get ADSL in a rural community, they’re obviously far better off with that and if there are businesses in rural areas that want to get a faster connection, my advice would be to go for bonded ADSL connections, so they can double up with two lines and get twice the speed. It will still be much, much cheaper than WiMAX.”

The RedKite service, to which McLean has signed up around 100 customers, requires a direct line of sight between a roof top base station and the client’s receiver, normally also positioned on a rooftop. Hence, it is not a viable option for a company in a low building surrounded by taller office blocks. For those who can get a direct line of sight, though, McLean believes a WiMAX connection can be a lifeline should they suffer an outage on their fixed line.

“We did very good business in Hemel Hempstead when the Buncefield oil plant had a fire,” he says.

“It’s this kind of situation where WiMAX comes in to its own. When you lose fixed connections you can be stranded, but if you have the back-up of wireless access, you can keep on performing as normal. It’s because we’re not used all year round, normally only when a company needs a back-up connection, that we decided to allow people to operate temporarily, above their normal connection speeds. We might sound like an expensive option, but when you compare us to a fixed, leased line it’s comparable and, of course, it has the benefit of being a different route to fixed, so it’s even better for business continuity.”

So it would appear that the ability of wireless to go beyond offering companies a back-up line and link communities to the web, will be limited to projects backed by public money, such as Swindon’s announcement of a Wi-Fi mesh this week. Even then, such a public private initiative would only appear viable in a large town which already has ADSL, widely available.

It underlines the need for people in not-spot areas who believe wireless is their best option, to get organised and install a shared connection themselves rather than wait for a company to find a business case to provide it for them.

http://tinyurl.com/ydzrnce

A source for believers in an alternative mobile future
Without copper or fibre to the home
Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | (show all)   Print Thread

Jump to