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Standard User Old_Git
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sat 20-Oct-12 04:45:09
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Re: Film Camera


[re: metalhead41] [link to this post]
 
Funny, I've been playing with an ME Super myself lately. Mainly with Ilford and an orange filter.

Some of my recent me super snaps: http://www.flickr.com/photos/trojanllama/sets/721576...

Standard User Aliturk
(fountain of knowledge) Sat 20-Oct-12 05:24:07
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Re: Film Camera


[re: Old_Git] [link to this post]
 
One thing I'm noticing a lot in London is the amount of young people walking around with film SLRs - minoltas, nikons, pentax. I don't know if they find this a novelty, whether it's for student projects and whether they'll find access to good film scanning too much trouble or expensive but one can't help noticing how nice and elegant these cameras look. I know snappy snaps do scanning, but the quality is pretty average.

I'm actually tempted myself to get a film SLR
Standard User Old_Git
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sat 20-Oct-12 19:59:49
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Re: Film Camera


[re: Zarjaz] [link to this post]
 
I've been using Poundland for films! Agfa and Kodak at ASA 200, 24 and 36 exposure a quid a piece. I've seen the same Kodak rolls elsewhere for £3.49and £2.49!

Cheap developing. Some people opt for buying Ilford B&W in bulk online. Develop their own, and then use a film scanner. I've not yet got around to developing my own, but I have bought a Canoscan 5600F, which is a flatbed / CCD combo scanner. Very slow, but I can make high resolutions scans from negatives. I don't need prints or CDs now. I can scan them better.

As for developing, for colour, I use a local independent developer with a working minilab. He charges me two quid for either 24 or 36 exposure no prints. I can now scan them myself on the Canoscan. He also develops B&W the 'old way', but tends to bodge them up with hard water, so I'm going to try http://www.ag-photolab.co.uk/bw-film-process-only-94... for my next B&W negs.

The colours - using Poundland film and my local developer, on 36 exposure works out 8p per exposure.

Edited by Old_Git (Sat 20-Oct-12 20:01:57)


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Standard User Zarjaz
(knowledge is power) Sat 20-Oct-12 21:57:51
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Re: Film Camera


[re: Old_Git] [link to this post]
 
Thanks. No.1 son is now able to get free B&W from his college, and is just learning how to develop the stuff himself ....

Standard User Zarjaz
(knowledge is power) Sat 20-Oct-12 22:01:52
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Re: Film Camera


[re: Aliturk] [link to this post]
 
Son's AS level group had a field trip in London last week, so I suppose multiply that by a fair few colleges, and there's your answer.
(he was the lanky git with the Pentax Spotmatic 2.) smile

Standard User Aliturk
(fountain of knowledge) Sat 20-Oct-12 22:47:44
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Re: Film Camera


[re: Zarjaz] [link to this post]
 
I notice a lot of them seem to be of far-eastern origin.

I came across this site earlier. I'd be tempted to get an OM1. It does seem as if film sales have bottomed out. Getting it processed has probably become a nice little earner for those that still do it. Problem is getting decent scans. I did have a Nikon Coolscan film scanner which I sold and I bitterly regret going so

Edited by Aliturk (Sat 20-Oct-12 22:49:04)

Standard User Zarjaz
(knowledge is power) Sun 21-Oct-12 08:41:06
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Re: Film Camera


[re: Aliturk] [link to this post]
 
Have had a fair degree of success getting them done at our local Asda, they will also, for a little more, do you a CD at the same time.

Standard User Old_Git
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sun 21-Oct-12 21:46:50
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Re: Film Camera


[re: Aliturk] [link to this post]
 
Here are a few recent scans from the Canoscan 5600F. It's very slow, but I can scan some lovely high resolution images on the CCD. These were from old negatives taken during the late 1990s with a compact autofocus 35mm camera. Family snapshots - but really please with the scans.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/trojanllama/sets/721576...

As for film being dead - I don't think so. The lomo and toy camera craze is setting in. I bought the girlfriend a brand new Diana Mini toy camera recently. Takes 35mm. The bummer is that it exposes in squares rather than the usual rectangular exposures, and this confuses the minilabsthat chop the prints to pieces, and splices through exposures. So now I ask for unspliced roll, and scan them myself.

I can scan far better than the offerings given by most developers on CDs.

Standard User Aliturk
(fountain of knowledge) Mon 22-Oct-12 13:17:40
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Re: Film Camera


[re: Old_Git] [link to this post]
 
I can scan far better than the offerings given by most developers on CDs.


Yes i did too, hence the regret over selling my scanner. I don't think film is dead, I think it's bottomed out. If people want their film images just for web use, then there are loads of options. But if people want serious quality and to get the best out of their negs, then a professional high rez scan to tiff or a high quality film scanner are the only options.

It's interesting that Jessops are selling a range of dedicated film scanners, some with digital ICE. I wonder what their market is for these. It must be worth their while.
Standard User TLM
(legend) Sun 04-Nov-12 23:59:45
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Re: Film Camera


[re: metalhead41] [link to this post]
 
I really liked NOT being able to see what you get, and having to think carefully, to avoid wasting film. It was always exciting getting them developed - or developing them yourself, if you were that adventurous, which I've only done a few times, at night class.

Although there was always the odd disappointment ("Light was too low after all", or "Damn camera strap got in the way!"), there was the delight of things coming out better than expected, too - sometimes effects you hadn't been planning for.

I still have my old 35mm, and haven't the heart to throw it away. It's amazing what a talking point it is, on the rare occasions I still take it out. Strangers come up to me, and say: "Wow! You still have one of THOSE!".

It's vintage, but hardly antique, dating from around the late 80s (1980s, in case you're wondering wink ) It's incredible how something that was once everywhere is now regarded as a museum piece, in a little over 20 years.

T.
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