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Standard User andyboygsi
(member) Sun 13-Mar-11 07:58:00
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: stevepressman] [link to this post]
 
yes he/she will more than likely go with that option as stapling 4wire is quicker than cleating cat5e

socket to openreach modem via typical dsl cable 1M

modem to router via cat5 1M also

rough guesses, its to early to go and get them out the van to measure

these comments are my own and in no way represent any company that i may or may not be linked too.

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Standard User D_an_W
(member) Sun 13-Mar-11 08:49:15
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: andyboygsi] [link to this post]
 
Thats exactly what I did.

The engineer was "concerned" I wasn't going to wall mount the modem but was happy enough when I said it was going to sit by itself on a shelf beside my AEBS (They do run warm).

Standard User Goza
(newbie) Mon 14-Mar-11 17:18:43
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: meditator] [link to this post]
 
I think that everything has been covered in this thread but it all appears much more complicated than need be. When it came to my installation, I was faced with a similar issue but I had two basic options; leave the Master socket where it is or move it to a more convenient location.

I opted to leave it where it was, Openreach engineer installed new socket and plugged modem into it, leaving it on the hallway floor. The modem is linked to the socket with a standard RJ11 fly lead so all I did was to run a long RJ11 to RJ11 cable from the master socket to my router location where I moved the modem. The cable is thin and was easy to hide and handle all the way. It works a treat. I used a ready made one and hid the slack but it would have been easy enough to make one. You have a choice of flat or round cable as well (I used flat).

I am intrigued by all the mention of RJ45 plugs though; my master socket has an RJ11 socket, not RJ45. Unless people are mentioning it in terms of connecting the router to the modem.


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Standard User systemx
(experienced) Mon 14-Mar-11 17:42:50
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: Goza] [link to this post]
 
All filter faceplates, including the VSDL one, have a RJ45 socket for broadband. This will also accept a RJ11 as well as a RJ45 plug.
Standard User Goza
(newbie) Mon 14-Mar-11 18:58:58
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: systemx] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by systemx:
All filter faceplates, including the VSDL one, have a RJ45 socket for broadband. This will also accept a RJ11 as well as a RJ45 plug.


I must have a closer look when I get home! I knew RJ45 socket accepts RJ11 but I could have sworn that mine was RJ11.

What about the socket on the modem? I'm fairly certain that is an RJ11 socket.
Standard User meditator
(fountain of knowledge) Tue 15-Mar-11 11:49:32
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: Goza] [link to this post]
 
Goza, what you've done is, strictly speaking, 'contrary to BT's intention' in so far as siting the new modem by the master socket. But personally, I can see nothing wrong with what you've done, nor can I understand the insistence of BT in always siting the modem at the master socket. I guess it must be something to do with BT being reluctant to otherwise take on the responsibilty for any extension wiring (since I guess they take on everything up to and including the modem).

You yourself, Goza, have been fortunate in being able to find a way of neatly laying an extension lead but please don't assume that this is always possible, or even aesthetically desirable, as many of us live in single-storey places with solid floors and thick brick partition walls.

For those of us who can't find an easy solution like yours, there are other ways of achieving the same, using a succession of wall penetrations and additional wall-mounted socketry. RobertoS has recently suggested a method, one that assumes making an unfiltered extension from the back of the master socket. (The extension connections on a standard NTE5 are filtered, I gather). This would involve replacing the consumer bit of the master NTE5 master socket with, say, an XTE-2005, and using either an XTF85 wall socket on the end of the extension or an RJ45 wall socket. The situation with BT and NTE5s, though, seems to be a bit fluid at present and there's rumour that BT can now provide an NTE5 with unfiltered connections at the rear.

I think the thing to do is let the BT technician install the modem by the NTE5, then yourself change the location of the modem as soon as possible. Making an unfiltered extension should not, in principle, affect the performance of the line, provided the extension's done with good workmanship and good-quality materials are used. I think the new rules now allow for up to 30 metres of customer extension, anyway. As I say, you yourself have now, in effect, done this, but have been fortunate enough to have managed it using just long patchleads.

Edited by meditator (Tue 15-Mar-11 11:56:20)

Standard User WWWombat
(regular) Tue 15-Mar-11 12:21:22
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: Goza] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Goza:
In reply to a post by systemx:
All filter faceplates, including the VSDL one, have a RJ45 socket for broadband. This will also accept a RJ11 as well as a RJ45 plug.


I must have a closer look when I get home! I knew RJ45 socket accepts RJ11 but I could have sworn that mine was RJ11.

What about the socket on the modem? I'm fairly certain that is an RJ11 socket.

My existing filtered faceplates are RJ11 (6P2C modular connectors), and don't take RJ45 (8P8C).

As far as I've seen so far, FTTC faceplates & modems are no different - the interconnect is an RJ11 cable.

The cable between FTTC modem and router is a full 8P8C RJ45 connection, carrying ethernet. Theoretically, these large sockets can accept the smaller jacks of the RJ11, but they obviously wouldn't carry all 8 connections.
Standard User systemx
(experienced) Tue 15-Mar-11 13:22:14
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: WWWombat] [link to this post]
 
All filter faceplates (the sort which fit onto NTE-5 master sockets) will accept RJ45 plugs as well as RJ11 for the broadband connection. Routers and stand alone modems only accept RJ11 plugs as the line connection. The connections are the centre pair in both plugs.


http://www.presscomm.co.uk/pdf/Pressac_Brochure_AW.pdf

Edited by systemx (Tue 15-Mar-11 13:34:59)

Standard User BatBoy
(legend) Tue 15-Mar-11 13:27:47
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: systemx] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by systemx:
All filter faceplates (the sort which fit onto NTE-5 master sockets) will accept RJ45 plugs as well as RJ11 for the broadband connection. Routers and stand alone modems only accept RJ11 plugs as the line connection. The connections are the centre pair in both plugs.
You may have to use a hammer though...



______________________________________________________________________________attack_the_post_not_the_poster__________________
Standard User Goza
(newbie) Tue 15-Mar-11 13:59:35
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Re: Got FTTC? How is the master socket configured?


[re: meditator] [link to this post]
 
I don't think I've done anything contrary to BT's intention really; the openreach installer offered the option of an extension (up to 30M I think) from the master socket. This would have effectively been the same as what I have done with the main difference being that the Openreach installer would have only done a surface run tacking it on skirting boards and architraves whereas I have hidden the cable and drilled through solid walls, etc. I mentioned it to him at the time and he said fine but the usual caveat of that section being my responsibility (nothing different from having a telephone extension point)

Interestingly, I have had a problem the past week with no connectivity at all so Fast (my ISP) got Openreach onto it. we suspected a faulty modem. Engineer arrived yesterday and in anticipation, I had re-sited the modem to right by the master socket and plugged it in there with the originally supplied RJ11 lead, leaving my extension cable plug dangling nearby.
I was out yesterday but my wife told me that he arrived, said they have been having power supply problems with these modems and promptly changed modem and PSU. However, he didn't plug it in at the master socket, he asked where the router was and actually put it back where I normally have it next to my router and used the extension cable I had fitted! Perhaps he thought it was a BT fitted extension cable.

On the matter of extension cabling; there is always a solution but it's just a matter of either time & skills, or money. If you have the time and skills, you can sort yourself out, otherwise, you can pay someone to do it for you. I had a choice of runs and it was a case of whether I wanted to take more time and trouble for an invisible run or a quicker solution but less aesthetically pleasing. As it is, I went for the neater solution because I'm comfortable fishing cables, drilling and running cables in the eaves, etc. I have solid floors and solid walls.

One day, when we do major work on the house, I will rewire my network cabling and have a proper 'Node 0' with a rack unit in a ventilated cupboard somewhere out of the way.
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