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Standard User bookey
(experienced) Thu 16-Jun-11 23:07:21
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: Chrysalis] [link to this post]
 
TalkTalk are.
Sky are but no public service offering yet.
The others will follow, otherwise they will bleed customers as the FTTx coverage improves (except Leicester tongue)

Also I know Leicester fairly well, I would say it more liable to get more FTTP than FTTC, if you look at the size of the FTTP thus far they are very small pockets, if BT want to hit 25% FTTP they are going to need to cover some large areas.
A bulk of key city centre locations have already be listed as getting FTTC, I would look at the fact Leicester city centre does not have FTTC planned as a good thing.

Edit: Can't spell...

Paul

Edited by bookey (Thu 16-Jun-11 23:09:46)

Standard User Chrysalis
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 16-Jun-11 23:33:35
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: bookey] [link to this post]
 
that would be an eye opener if it happened.

didnt know talktalk had started FTTC services sorry.
Standard User New_Londoner
(member) Fri 17-Jun-11 09:02:16
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: WWWombat] [link to this post]
 
Analysis Mason did a report on this, I think for the government so it should be readily available online. It gave suggested coverage based on various % of the population to be covered. It would be interesting to compare its predictions for 66% coverage with those areas where FTTC coverage has already been announced to see if there are any/many differences.

What may people seem to ignore when querying why their area has not yet been included is the small issue of manpower. I wonder whether the deployment to date would make more sense if you take into account where deployments first took place and then whether what happened next mainly focused on nearby areas?

If that is the case, it may well be that Nottingham, Derby etc are not close to other main centres of deployment so will be done when the people involved have finished in say Birmingham. Just a thought, I may be wrong.

---

All opinions expressed by me are my own

BT Infinity
Speedtest result (excluding 2Mbps for BT Vision)


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Standard User nelix01
(member) Fri 17-Jun-11 09:40:27
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: New_Londoner] [link to this post]
 
New_Londoner,

I noticed on your sig that you link to a line speed result and quote this is excluding 2Mbps for Vision, can I ask what the impact of having vision has on the speedtest results? I only ask as I have vision myself.

Standard User Ignitionnet
(knowledge is power) Fri 17-Jun-11 12:32:15
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: billford] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by billford:
In reply to a post by WWWombat:
The top 25 urban areas account for 25 Million people - or about 43% of the country. The 25th place, incidentally, was Swansea with a size of 270,000.

It is probably fair to say that BT's *original* plan, to cover 40% of the UK by 2012, would have mainly focussed on exactly these areas (except, presumably, they can't do Kingston upon Hull).
I'm sure you're aware in reality that BT don't seem to have followed that methodology...

The town near to where I live has a population around 25,000 and comes in at below 500th in terms of size- FTTC went live last August crazy

Even the affluence argument doesn't fit all that well- the general area (South Oxfordshire) is undoubtedly reasonably well off, but the town (Didcot) was classified by the EU as a "deprived area" (or something similar, I forget the exact term).


Look at who Didcot's MP is, and his responsibilities.

Also bear in mind a large proportion of the town is the Ladygrove estate, which is fairly affluent and completely uncabled.
Standard User bookey
(experienced) Fri 17-Jun-11 12:55:36
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: Ignitionnet] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Ignitionnet:
Look at who Didcot's MP is, and his responsibilities.


I laughed at that but I expect your logic is correct.
Same applies for Penrith, Cumbria - http://www.rorystewart.co.uk/press-coverage

Paul
Moderator billford
(moderator) Fri 17-Jun-11 13:00:10
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: Ignitionnet] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Ignitionnet:
Look at who Didcot's MP is, and his responsibilities.
Yeah, but he lives in (well, just outside) Wantage tongue


WANTAGE Oxfordshire SMWN FTTC Sep-11

~~~~~~~~~~~~
Bill

[email protected] _______________Planes and Cars and ..._______________BQM & Speed

Edited by billford (Fri 17-Jun-11 13:04:49)

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband moderator but it does not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User New_Londoner
(member) Fri 17-Jun-11 19:49:37
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: nelix01] [link to this post]
 
IIRC Vision takes a slice of downstream bandwidth and reserves it for its own use, which should mean that speedtests etc reduce accordingly. I may be wrong but my speedtest results did drop when Vision was activated, which seems to confirm it.

---

All opinions expressed by me are my own

BT Infinity
Speedtest result (excluding 2Mbps for BT Vision)
Standard User WWWombat
(committed) Fri 17-Jun-11 21:07:56
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: New_Londoner] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by New_Londoner:
IIRC Vision takes a slice of downstream bandwidth and reserves it for its own use, which should mean that speedtests etc reduce accordingly. I may be wrong but my speedtest results did drop when Vision was activated, which seems to confirm it.


I thought the way this kind of thing was supposed to work was that there would be an "assured session" assigned, which guaranteed a certain rate through the network. There is a time-based charge to have this running, so I'd imagine it is only present when you are actually watching a BT Vision channel at the time.

The BT Speedtester has this warning: "If you are running an assured rate session, please be aware that the test will temporarily interrupt your session for upto 30 seconds. Your session will be restored when the test is complete."

I doubt if Speedtest.net can have this effect on an assured session. However, I doubt if you can really get an extra 2Mbps on a line where Speedtest.net already report 37.5Mbps. Not on the 40Mbps FTTC products, anway.
Standard User WWWombat
(committed) Fri 17-Jun-11 22:41:28
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Re: will there be cities in the final "hard to reach" 10%


[re: New_Londoner] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by New_Londoner:
Analysis Mason did a report on this, I think for the government so it should be readily available online. It gave suggested coverage based on various % of the population to be covered. It would be interesting to compare its predictions for 66% coverage with those areas where FTTC coverage has already been announced to see if there are any/many differences.


Brilliant - thanks for that. I managed to find 2 interesting documents....

The first I found was a discussion on rollout of FTTP GPON technology for Ofcom. For *this* thread, on which cities will get fibre, appendix B is most useful: It mentions their "Geotyping", which is their way of classifying the different coverage areas within the UK. It takes the "large urban area" model I used in my earlier post, but overlays it with exchange location. It also takes exchange size into account.

I think this will give us a better model for predicting which exchanges will get fibre.

I'll read this a little more, and come back with a better predictive model for which exchanges are likely to get converted.

The second document is a report on the cost of rollout of fibre (including both FTTC and FTTP). I found this from references in the first.

This goes into further depth on the "geotypes", so includes categories for 100% of UK premises (a total of 27 million).

At a quick glance, it provides a great view of why BT have targetted 67% for now, and why I suspect they'll get a good chunk of the next 20% once subsidies are taken into account.

There is one great quote in there: "... that the fixed costs of deploying new infrastructure far outweigh the variable costs. This means that the cost per home connected is highly dependent on the level of take-up."

That sentence alone probably explains why Infinity is priced at a level to attract people - both back from Virgin, and as a no-brainer upgrade from existing service.

What may people seem to ignore when querying why their area has not yet been included is the small issue of manpower....

Not me. I think manpower is one of the crucial issues. And I think it hits in many subtle ways - probably including core installation, in-house installation, and even targetting of marketing efforts.
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