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Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Thu 14-Nov-19 14:44:31
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: gary333] [link to this post]
 
Wireless bridge port then smile

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User jelv
(knowledge is power) Thu 14-Nov-19 15:45:12
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: tedsloan] [link to this post]
 
My setup uses homeplugs.

Downstairs:
80/20 FTTC (full speed sync) -> HG612 -> ZyXEL VMG1312-B10D -> TP link AV600 ->

Upstairs:
TP link AV600 -> 1GB switch -> PC

Speed test
My Broadband Speed Test

There's something wrong as I'd expect you to see better.

(Just to add to my setup I also have some AV200 homeplugs which sync quite happily with the AV600 and don't show the 600 link down.

jelv

AAISP November 2016
(Previous ISP Plusnet November 2001 to October 2016) Why I left Plusnet
Telephone rental: Pulse8
Standard User andyhurley
(regular) Thu 14-Nov-19 16:01:05
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
On the other hand in my experience the difference between being on the same ring and a different ring in the same house is drastic in both throughput and reliability (kept loosing connection between the two).

If you have had a difference experience that just goes to show how temperamental these things are. I guess if your requirements are low then they can be a solution but frankly one needs to ignore the guff about headline speeds.


The last point is certainly true. I have used the current set of powerlines in 3 different houses and in all cases they were on different rings. One had an old fashioned fuse wire consumer unit so no electronics 'between' the rings, the other two had MCBs on each ring and one of those also had two different RCDs covering those rings. In all cases the difference in speed between same ring and different ring was less than 10% but also in all cases maximum throughput was a fraction of the advertised speed.

The biggest problem was always 'noisy' equipment such as immersion heaters, tumble driers, dishwashers etc - they need to be kept well away from such things. Oh, and surge protected power strips can cause issues too in some cases as they can have suppressors which 'suppress' the powerline signal which is obviously a no-no. I always try to plug straight into a wall socket even if that means running a longish cat5/6 cable around the room.


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Standard User brookheather
(member) Thu 14-Nov-19 17:25:52
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: gary333] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by gary333:
It's certainly a shame as they are good priced. The port is so you can plug a wired only device in to it - printer maybe.. Backhaul is still done via WiFi. On the larger discs all of them can be wired if you so wish.

Someone on HUKD who has these minis said they do support Ethernet backhaul.

Cerberus FTTP + pfSense + Asus RT-AC67U AiMesh
Standard User gary333
(member) Thu 14-Nov-19 18:57:21
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: brookheather] [link to this post]
 
Thanks for bringing this up. I purchased the Mini's in August and they didn't work as I expected. I assumed they'd be the same as the large version, bar less powerfull. Upon checking BT forum the following was said (saying it wouldn't work) so I sent them back

Can I connect more than one disc to my hub (router) using the Ethernet cables?

If youíre using Whole Home Wi-Fi, you can. If you wish, you can locate a disc a long distance from your hub (router) - for example, in an outbuilding - and have an Ethernet cable connection back to your hub (router). Just plug in the cable in the discís RJ45 socket and itíll join your Whole Home Wi-Fi network.

If youíre using Mini Whole Home Wi-Fi, you canít. Only your first disc can be connected to the hub (router) using an Ethernet cable. All other discs are connected via wi-fi. You can use the Ethernet port on these discs for devices such as TVs and printers.

However, the good news is that same link now states you can so they must have updated the firmware:

Can I connect more than one disc to my hub (router) using the Ethernet cables?

If you're using Whole Home Wi-Fi or Mini Whole Home Wi-Fi, you can. If you wish, you can locate a disc a long distance from your hub (router) - for example, in an outbuilding - and have an Ethernet cable connection back to your hub (router). Just plug in the cable in the discís RJ45 socket and it'll join your Whole Home Wi-Fi network.

Edited by gary333 (Thu 14-Nov-19 19:04:03)

Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Thu 14-Nov-19 19:14:26
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: gary333] [link to this post]
 
Only your first disc can be connected to the hub (router) using an Ethernet cable


Only ever really expected the first disc to connect via Ethernet, so they do work as I expected then.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User gary333
(member) Thu 14-Nov-19 19:19:10
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by MrSaffron:
Only your first disc can be connected to the hub (router) using an Ethernet cable


Only ever really expected the first disc to connect via Ethernet, so they do work as I expected then.


Looks like we were both wrong then wink as BT are now advertising that each and every disc will be able to connect independently to a router smile.
Standard User jchamier
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 14-Nov-19 23:05:04
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
On the white discs, you can use the Ethernet port on the secondary ones to feed a device such as a game system or TV without WiFi. The first one needs to be attached to the router forever by Ethernet.

No idea on the black discs.

plusnet 80/20 (2/jun/14) at 470m - sync history: 64/9(Sep/17),54/6(Jan/19),46/7(Sep/19)
Back to cable after 15 years, VM due 22nd Nov.
20 years of broadband from 1999's ntl:cable modem trial - Live BQM
Standard User jabuzzard
(committed) Fri 15-Nov-19 11:21:34
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by MrSaffron:
Only your first disc can be connected to the hub (router) using an Ethernet cable


Only ever really expected the first disc to connect via Ethernet, so they do work as I expected then.


I would expect to be able to connect all the discs using ethernet myself, because frankly it should work much better that way as wireless bandwidth is not wasted communicating between the discs. I would also expect to be able to power the things using PoE.
Standard User jchamier
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 15-Nov-19 16:26:09
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Re: FTTP and Powerline Adapter.


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
I would expect to be able to connect all the discs using ethernet myself, because frankly it should work much better that way as wireless bandwidth is not wasted communicating between the discs. I would also expect to be able to power the things using PoE.

They're not the product for you if you have structured cabling plans. They are very domestic grade, designed to solve a specific problem, and have a very competitive price point (e.g. Argos).

A friend of mine has installed structured cabling during extension works, into his split loft, where he has installed Edimax access points that are linked to each other as a single logical controller. Sitting in the loft pointing downwards, these work amazingly and give full home coverage. The linking together means you can roam between parts of the house without dropping WiFi 5GHz. He is on Virgin's 200 Mbps service, and thanks to 5GHz the laptops and mobile devices all achieve that speed anywhere in the home.

Many people don't have the time or inclination to site their ISP router correctly, never mind install a structured cabling style environment with Cat 5e cabling in the walls. It is the best solution if you have the money and inclination! smile

plusnet 80/20 (2/jun/14) at 470m - sync history: 64/9(Sep/17),54/6(Jan/19),46/7(Sep/19)
Back to cable after 15 years, VM due 22nd Nov.
20 years of broadband from 1999's ntl:cable modem trial - Live BQM
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