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Standard User No_One
(committed) Wed 11-Nov-20 19:13:13
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Can someone identify this connector?


[link to this post]
 
While up in the loft the other day I tracked the route out phone line comes into the house to the master socket and found this in the middle. The house was built in the mid 60s and I'd guess this is probably original to the house.

https://i.imgur.com/1tYq14J.jpg

At first glance it looks to be an old standard connector (Maybe a block terminal 20/4?) but I have no idea what the 2 rusty looking wires are (Earth maybe?). Ultimately I want to know if this could be having an affect on my VDSL. My predicted speeds are

Clean 80-71.3
Impacted 80-67

I'm actually getting 55 which although is decent and stable, I want to be sure I'm getting the best I can. The problem is that I'm using an openreach modem and therefore don't have access to any line stats. I know that as this connector is before the master socket it would be the responsibilty of openreach so just looking for comments at this point
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 11-Nov-20 19:21:34
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
Looks a little like a junction box, the two pairs of rusty wires are they bare metal? If so then not part of the telephone line

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User No_One
(committed) Wed 11-Nov-20 19:23:07
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Yeah they're bare metal. I wasn't able to see there they go. The white cable down down through the ceiling and into the back of the mater socket


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Standard User MC31
(member) Wed 11-Nov-20 19:27:21
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
Its just a old junction box with screw terminations. The wire is a earth wire and no longer used (but can be useful for testing)

these comments are my own and in no way represent any company that i may or may not be linked too.
Standard User Zarjaz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Wed 11-Nov-20 19:51:33
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: MC31] [link to this post]
 
As MC31 rightly says. It’s an old bakelite screw terminal connector. The bare wires were for an earth connection which used to be required.

I’d be tempted to unscrew the single screw in the lid and carefully remove the lid ... let’s have a picture of the guts of it. Depending on the location and local conditions, the screw terminals can get corroded and produce an HR fault.

Standard User No_One
(committed) Wed 11-Nov-20 19:56:50
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: Zarjaz] [link to this post]
 
Is there any possibility that removing the earth wires would improve my connection speed?

I'll take the cover off and get a pic of the inside when I next get a chance to get up into the loft. Might not be for a while though
Standard User Zarjaz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Wed 11-Nov-20 21:10:59
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
The earth wire isn’t connected to your pair. You’d have a huge earth ‘hum’ over the dial tone ... and it would test faulty (which you’d hope might have been picked up at some point since the property was built)

Standard User partial
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 11-Nov-20 23:14:26
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
The earth wire will have been disconnected when the line stopped being a party line back in the day.

Probably best off leaving the whole thing alone.

802
Standard User RobertoS
(elder) Wed 11-Nov-20 23:43:56
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: Zarjaz] [link to this post]
 
Odd that there are something like five "earth wires". Seriously to be hoped they aren't connected to anything.

__________________________________________________________
Sovereignty Means Sovereignty

My broadband basic info/help site - www.robertos.me.uk. Domains, sites and mail hosting - Tsohost & Ionos.
Connections: OnePlus 8 Pro max 165Mbps down, 24Mbps up on Three, and B311 4G, tbb tests normally 35-45Mpbs down, 65Mbps off-peak, 9-24 up.
========================
Experience shows us that love does not consist in gazing at each other but in looking together in the same direction.
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.
Standard User No_One
(committed) Thu 12-Nov-20 00:11:46
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: partial] [link to this post]
 
What is/was a party line?
Standard User Zarjaz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 12-Nov-20 05:51:00
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: RobertoS] [link to this post]
 
Five ? It is just a bare multi stranded bit of copper. They aren’t connected, PSTN would have been affected (forever)

They are quite a common thing, but I suppose if you aren’t looking, you don’t see them.

Standard User clyde123
(member) Thu 12-Nov-20 09:43:37
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by No_One:
What is/was a party line?


Here speaks a youngster smile
Standard User CJT
(experienced) Thu 12-Nov-20 10:05:08
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by No_One:
What is/was a party line?


to my knowledge a telephone line shared by 2 properties, which had different ring tones depending who was called.

I am sure if I am wrong someone will correct me

CJT.

On BT Broadband up to 80 Mbps...

But NOT for much longer!

Previously on NOW TV Broadband up to 38 Mbps
Standard User jchamier
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 12-Nov-20 10:27:02
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by No_One:
What is/was a party line?

Seek and ye shall receive:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Party_line_(telephony)

21 years of broadband connectivity since 1999 trial - Live BQM
Standard User partial
(fountain of knowledge) Thu 12-Nov-20 10:36:31
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: jchamier] [link to this post]
 
From the provided wiki link.

In the system of divided ringing, the ringing circuit was separated from the talking circuit by adding a ground connection between the central office and the subscriber stations for ringing. On the same subscriber line, one party used the tip side of the line and ground for ringing, whilst the other party on the same line used the ring wire and ground for ringing, to achieve full selectivity for two-party lines, in which only the selected station would ring


The classic old lineman's tale is of the household dog being tied to the earth wire and the customer reporting the phone doesn't ring, the dog barks instead.

The party line telephone also had a 'call exchange' button which earthed one of the legs in order to pull a dial tone. This enabled accurate billing.

As repeatedly said, there is nothing to be gained by messing with the earth wire. It is disconnected.

802

Edited by partial (Thu 12-Nov-20 10:41:04)

Standard User RobertoS
(elder) Thu 12-Nov-20 11:53:10
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: partial] [link to this post]
 
Or simply cut? Could that cause a problem, as wouldn't it create an unterminated bridge tap?

One thing seems certain to me. That it is still connected inside that box. If it had been opened and disconnected it would not have been left entering it.

__________________________________________________________
Sovereignty Means Sovereignty

My broadband basic info/help site - www.robertos.me.uk. Domains, sites and mail hosting - Tsohost & Ionos.
Connections: OnePlus 8 Pro max 165Mbps down, 24Mbps up on Three, and B311 4G, tbb tests normally 35-45Mpbs down, 65Mbps off-peak, 9-24 up.
========================
Experience shows us that love does not consist in gazing at each other but in looking together in the same direction.
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.
Standard User partial
(fountain of knowledge) Thu 12-Nov-20 12:12:10
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: RobertoS] [link to this post]
 
Earth wires connected to a circuit doesn't cause a 'bridge tap' it causes an earth fault.

The party line switched the earth via the party line phone. It was never connected directly to the A and B wires in block terminals.

802
Standard User RobertoS
(elder) Thu 12-Nov-20 13:29:46
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: partial] [link to this post]
 
I said it might have been cut, meaning elsewhere outside the box. It would not then be an earth wire! 😎

__________________________________________________________
Sovereignty Means Sovereignty

My broadband basic info/help site - www.robertos.me.uk. Domains, sites and mail hosting - Tsohost & Ionos.
Connections: OnePlus 8 Pro max 165Mbps down, 24Mbps up on Three, and B311 4G, tbb tests normally 35-45Mpbs down, 65Mbps off-peak, 9-24 up.
========================
Experience shows us that love does not consist in gazing at each other but in looking together in the same direction.
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.
Standard User panda
(experienced) Thu 12-Nov-20 14:27:15
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: RobertoS] [link to this post]
 
Regardless of whether it is connected to earth or not, it will not be connected to anything inside the box. It will be terminated on an otherwise unused terminal.
If it were connected to the line in any way, it would present itself as an earth fault and be audible during a call.

As has already been explained several times, the earth was used as part of a shared service. The earth was connected via a switch inside the telephone, not directly to the line. If the telephone (and hence switch) have been removed, the earth is no longer connected to anything.

Eats shoots and leaves.
Standard User RobertoS
(elder) Thu 12-Nov-20 15:23:04
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: panda] [link to this post]
 
All these people telling me I'm wrong, when they have no idea whatsoever what is connected inside that box. So far I have shown that none of them know.

Here's a little question for you.

If it is connected to an otherwise unused terminal, what did it ever do? The answer seems to be here:
In reply to a post by partial:
From the provided wiki link.
In the system of divided ringing, the ringing circuit was separated from the talking circuit by adding a ground connection between the central office and the subscriber stations for ringing. On the same subscriber line, one party used the tip side of the line and ground for ringing, whilst the other party on the same line used the ring wire and ground for ringing, to achieve full selectivity for two-party lines, in which only the selected station would ring
So it was and quite possibly still is connected. If you can tell from the initial photo what is connected to what, and what isn't, you are one very clever person indeed.

I suggest for a starter that there are two strands of twisted wires. A pair from the right disappears into the insulation on the left, and some others go down beside the white cable.

Nobody on this forum knows what has been done inside or outside that connector box since it was (presumably) properly wired up some time ago. Many seem to be assuming that whatever disconnecting has been done has been carried out by a BT engineer, or a contractor, or a house wiring electrician, or a DIY job, and done correctly.

Of course none of those ever does a slapdash job. (In case of doubt about that list, I have never known a GPO/BT/Openreach engineer be slapdash. It's just a list of the possible disconnectors. I would be amazed if a "BT" one was involved in leaving the assembly looking like that).

The amassed wisdom is that there cannot possibly be any problem with that wire. It/they never rang external bells so people in the front or back garden could hear there was an incoming call?

I respectfully suggest those wires are connected to an in-use terminal inside that box. Where they go and how they end outside none of us know, though I largely accept this post:
In reply to a post by Zarjaz:
The earth wire isn’t connected to your pair. You’d have a huge earth ‘hum’ over the dial tone ... and it would test faulty (which you’d hope might have been picked up at some point since the property was built)
I don't think however that rules out those wires being connected inside the box but disconnected and non-earthed somewhere in the building.

__________________________________________________________
Sovereignty Means Sovereignty

My broadband basic info/help site - www.robertos.me.uk. Domains, sites and mail hosting - Tsohost & Ionos.
Connections: OnePlus 8 Pro max 165Mbps down, 24Mbps up on Three, and B311 4G, tbb tests normally 35-45Mpbs down, 65Mbps off-peak, 9-24 up.
========================
Experience shows us that love does not consist in gazing at each other but in looking together in the same direction.
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.
Standard User dect
(fountain of knowledge) Thu 12-Nov-20 16:13:58
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: RobertoS] [link to this post]
 
That Wiki link is very North American, I remember in the late 80's configuring customer telephone switches (large key systems rather than PABXs) imported from Canada like the BT Septara and they use to refer to the incoming lines as 'Central Office' (CO) within their configuration, although not a term used here in the UK.

Edit: No comment from me regarding the earth wire wink

Edited by dect (Thu 12-Nov-20 16:16:37)

Standard User 4M2
(knowledge is power) Thu 12-Nov-20 17:07:19
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: RobertoS] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by RobertoS:
Nobody on this forum knows what has been done inside or outside that connector box since it was (presumably) properly wired up some time ago. Many seem to be assuming that whatever disconnecting has been done has been carried out by a BT engineer, or a contractor, or a house wiring electrician, or a DIY job, and done correctly.

Of course none of those ever does a slapdash job. (In case of doubt about that list, I have never known a GPO/BT/Openreach engineer be slapdash. It's just a list of the possible disconnectors. I would be amazed if a "BT" one was involved in leaving the assembly looking like that).


Just to let you know: I have an external BT66 junction box that still has a single copper earth wire leading from it to ground, it is not connected to the terminals within the box but from a casual external view one might think it is. Several years ago the internal NTE5 was relocated by a BT/OR engineer and wired to that junction box but that earth wire was not fully removed.

Actually the drop wire connections within the BT66 are done through a screw block terminal and one day i need to get them replaced with gel crimps smile

Edited by 4M2 (Thu 12-Nov-20 17:09:58)

Standard User AL66
(member) Thu 12-Nov-20 17:52:09
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: CJT] [link to this post]
 
Had one as a child, shared with lady up the road. Each had its own number so only rang for the number called.

Just looked it up, ring current was over A leg and earth for one and B leg and earth for the other. Voice over A & B which is why you could hear the other party when they were using the line.
Standard User sidef
(learned) Thu 12-Nov-20 18:56:09
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: partial] [link to this post]
 
As a child of the 70s, I remember us having a party line. We had the very modern (for the time) Trimphone, rather than the more traditional GPO dial phone of the time.

At the base of the phone at the front there was a long "switch bar" which needed to be pressed to get a dial tone. I never understood why - but I do now!

I remember my parents often commenting about "someone else on the line" and recall them mentioning the party line.

Our property was on the boundary for the Cosham and Fareham exchanges in Hampshire. Our party line was on the Cosham exchange. I guess being a new estate and on the exchange fringe meant there weren't enough E side pairs left.

By the late 70s, I remember every house in the estate was switched over to the Fareham exchange - I suppose a new cabinet and expansion of E side cables took place and we got a new number. The Trimphone was replaced - and this time it was a variant without the switch...

My current late 1970s property has the later style GPO junction box, with a new cable from there to a modern NTE. The junction box still has an earth wire on an unused terminal, so I presume this property used to have a party line as well.
Standard User No_One
(committed) Thu 12-Nov-20 20:20:00
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: sidef] [link to this post]
 
I've got no idea if this house had anything like that or not. The house has been in the family since my grandparents had it built in the 60s. I was born in 1980 so it's possible
Standard User APTMAN
(member) Thu 12-Nov-20 21:35:10
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
The younger people on the forum maybe do not know the 'Earth' wire did not have any insulation like nowadays, that in the photo looks like 3/.029", if I remember correctly you also had 7/.029" = 7 strands of 0.029" bare tin coated copper wires.
Standard User Ancient_Mariner
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 12-Nov-20 23:31:39
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: APTMAN] [link to this post]
 
Your mention of 3/.029 caught my eye.

Back in the early 1970s, our telephone number was the Name of the Exchange 3029 a few years later 54 was added and it became 543029. However in between that I was thinking one day, I know that number and thought that I knew someone else with a number ending 3029. Then it dawned on me, 3 strands of 0.029 inch diameter wire as used relatively recently for lighting circuits, now 1mm ^2

Annoyingly after our house was built we had to wait months for the Post Office as it was to connect the 30 or so house to the local exchange. All but one house had a telephone line. Then a few years later the house next door to ours, the one without a phone, wanted one. So the Post Office decided that ours and the house across the road would become party lines - the house which then had the new connection got an exclusive live!

We had two phones, permanently connected as they were then with the bells in series and utilising the ring capacitor in one of the phones. Since there was a concrete path all around our house, they could not fit an earth rod, so instead connected one of the 4 cores to the main earth terminal of our electricity supply. Not a neat job. The Engineer simply opened up the insulation of the 4-core cable and connected a wire to it and wrapped it with insulation tape. The other end going into the earth terminal.

It proved annoying; especially when I was away at sea and after waiting an hour or so for a telephone call home to find that the phone number was engaged when it wasn't. The way out of that then being the Post Office Radio Station at Portishead to get the local operator to break in on the call taking place and advise of an incoming call.

Those were the days? crazy

Cheers!

Clive

Andrews & Arnold Home::1 FTTC DrayTek Vigor 2762ac Cisco SPA112 and HUAWEI E5776 with O2 Data SIM
Standard User panda
(experienced) Fri 13-Nov-20 06:02:05
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: RobertoS] [link to this post]
 
Dunning-Kruger in full effect I think.
Those who work with this stuff, (and you've had several people with a combined professional experience probably in excess of double your lifetime) understand what it is, what it did when in use, how it did it and that it is no longer in use.
If it is connected to an otherwise unused terminal, what did it ever do?
I don't know how many times you need this explaining?
The earth was connected to a switch inside the telephone used to signal the exchange. The shared service telephone has been removed, ergo the switch has been removed too, so the earth is no longer connected to anything.

Eats shoots and leaves.
Standard User rogerh
(committed) Fri 13-Nov-20 17:19:20
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: panda] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by panda:
Dunning-Kruger in full effect I think.
Those who work with this stuff, (and you've had several people with a combined professional experience probably in excess of double your lifetime) understand what it is, what it did when in use, how it did it and that it is no longer in use.
If it is connected to an otherwise unused terminal, what did it ever do?
I don't know how many times you need this explaining?
The earth was connected to a switch inside the telephone used to signal the exchange. The shared service telephone has been removed, ergo the switch has been removed too, so the earth is no longer connected to anything.


If you want a counter-example, my drop wire untiil very recently (when Openreach replaced my 18SWG flat twin drop wire for a compliant FTTP connection wiith associated copper) went into a GPO (sic) junction box with an earth wire which was both connected and not connected to the two signal wires by spark gaps. I was sad to see it bypassed!

Roger Hayter
Standard User panda
(experienced) Fri 13-Nov-20 17:32:36
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: rogerh] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by rogerh:
If you want a counter-example, my drop wire untiil very recently (when Openreach replaced my 18SWG flat twin drop wire for a compliant FTTP connection wiith associated copper) went into a GPO (sic) junction box with an earth wire which was both connected and not connected to the two signal wires by spark gaps. I was sad to see it bypassed!
Different use of earth in your scenario. Yours was for lightning protection, rather than a shared service. The terminal block in your case would have been far deeper to accommodate the surge protectors, instead of the simple block linked from the OP.
As an aside, lightning protection was discontinued as it was mostly ineffectual. It could help a little with induced surges, but not with strikes. A lightning bolt will traverse thousands of feet through air, so a minimal spark gap was pointless.

Eats shoots and leaves.
Standard User 4M2
(knowledge is power) Fri 13-Nov-20 18:09:04
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: panda] [link to this post]
 
Didn't earlier NTE5's also have forms of surge protection which I believe has been discontinued in the more recent models?
Standard User rogerh
(committed) Fri 13-Nov-20 19:00:23
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: panda] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by panda:
In reply to a post by rogerh:
If you want a counter-example, my drop wire untiil very recently (when Openreach replaced my 18SWG flat twin drop wire for a compliant FTTP connection wiith associated copper) went into a GPO (sic) junction box with an earth wire which was both connected and not connected to the two signal wires by spark gaps. I was sad to see it bypassed!
Different use of earth in your scenario. Yours was for lightning protection, rather than a shared service. The terminal block in your case would have been far deeper to accommodate the surge protectors, instead of the simple block linked from the OP.
As an aside, lightning protection was discontinued as it was mostly ineffectual. It could help a little with induced surges, but not with strikes. A lightning bolt will traverse thousands of feet through air, so a minimal spark gap was pointless.


Fair enough! I only mentioned it for fun, I wanted to say "connected and not connected".

Roger Hayter
Standard User partial
(fountain of knowledge) Fri 13-Nov-20 19:36:39
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Re: Can someone identify this connector?


[re: 4M2] [link to this post]
 
Yes the original NTE5s had an earth terminal which you could swap out the standard A-B surge protector to one that discharged to earth. I never saw one fitted.

802
Standard User No_One
(committed) Sun 15-Nov-20 11:44:30
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
I was able to get back up there this morning and snapped these photos of inside the connector

https://i.imgur.com/FZ7QtKV.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/wHZaY8L.jpg

Any thoughts?
Standard User clyde123
(member) Sun 15-Nov-20 12:29:27
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
I'm not certain, but it looks like the bright green wire from the cream cable might be connected to that old earth wire.

Is that ethernet cable on the right hand side - 8 wires ?
If so, and looking at the amount of insulation strip back on the cream cable wires, I'd say that was probably never a BT engineer who did that.
Standard User Realalemadrid
(committed) Sun 15-Nov-20 13:08:24
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: clyde123] [link to this post]
 
@ clyde123 The earth wire would have been connected by that green wire to the old party line phone but as they no longer exist it will not be connected to anything at the other end.
Can't tell from the photos which pairs are used for the phone, it all looks rather untidy and the green on the other cable has been crushed by the cover.frown
Standard User clyde123
(member) Sun 15-Nov-20 13:30:33
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: Realalemadrid] [link to this post]
 
Agreed.
Certainly looks like the orange wire is one of of a pair, but uncertain about the other. I "think" it's the blue. But looking at the first photo (Sunday @1144) I initially thought it was the brown wire.
Standard User No_One
(committed) Sun 15-Nov-20 14:07:13
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: clyde123] [link to this post]
 
It looks like a section of the cable prior to this connector has been replaced at some point.

This is where it enters the loft from the pole outside and into this newer style connector (I've not looked inside this yet. The black cable you see here is just the tv aerial

https://i.imgur.com/kMYwSKp.jpg

It then runs along this beam and then down into the older connector

https://i.imgur.com/9dHLzEe.jpg
Standard User dect
(fountain of knowledge) Sun 15-Nov-20 14:11:49
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by No_One:
I was able to get back up there this morning and snapped these photos of inside the connector

https://i.imgur.com/FZ7QtKV.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/wHZaY8L.jpg

Any thoughts?
In these pictures what cable is going to the master socket? the one going up or the one going down?
Standard User Zarjaz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sun 15-Nov-20 14:13:28
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
The terminals are clean and not corroded. It looks OK, if a little untidy.

Replace the lid. It’s nothing to worry unduly about. Those old bakelite housings are pretty damn solid, certainly more robust than their modern replacements. Maybe the pair being crimped through might be preferable, but you aren’t supposed to touch the cable, so just leave it be.

Standard User No_One
(committed) Sun 15-Nov-20 14:17:12
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: dect] [link to this post]
 
The one going down.
Standard User Zarjaz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sun 15-Nov-20 14:17:31
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
Yes it does.

That brown downlead feeding in from outside is good stuff, nice and robust.

Standard User Zarjaz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sun 15-Nov-20 14:18:37
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
.... and you have a standard NTE on the end of that ? Not an LJU ?

Standard User No_One
(committed) Sun 15-Nov-20 14:22:48
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: Zarjaz] [link to this post]
 
Yes an NTE5C
Standard User dect
(fountain of knowledge) Sun 15-Nov-20 14:22:57
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by No_One:
The one going down.
OK so that has the earth on the green wire which use to be connected to pin 4 on a standard LJU for earth recall before the now more popular used timed break recall.

As you have a standard NTE it will not be connected

Edited by dect (Sun 15-Nov-20 15:44:36)

Standard User Zarjaz
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sun 15-Nov-20 16:35:06
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
So it’s all good then.

Standard User dect
(fountain of knowledge) Sun 15-Nov-20 16:55:31
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: Zarjaz] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Zarjaz:
So it’s all good then.
+1
Standard User No_One
(committed) Sun 15-Nov-20 17:13:06
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: dect] [link to this post]
 
Yep. I guess that the estimates are just a little generous then
Standard User dect
(fountain of knowledge) Sun 15-Nov-20 17:29:57
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Re: Can someone identify this connector? PICS OF INSIDE!


[re: No_One] [link to this post]
 
You said it was stable in your original post and that is the most important thing for me, I would take stable over a little extra speed any day.
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