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Standard User heathrow
(regular) Sun 07-Feb-21 21:07:40
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: kitcat] [link to this post]
 
Load balancing works well when you have lots of things happening.
Standard User Rolandrat
(experienced) Mon 08-Feb-21 09:28:47
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: kitcat] [link to this post]
 
Any multi WAN Draytek with session based load balancing has always done a damn fine job for me, have used one with 3 x mobile connections and currently 2 x FTTP connections.
No its not bonding but any multi session activity is handled very well. Always a few on Ebay to pick up cheap.
Standard User ian72
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Mon 08-Feb-21 14:40:20
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: hoopla] [link to this post]
 
I don't think you'll really find a solution that uses the downstream from FTTC and the upstream from 4G. Generally the return path is going to be the same as the outgoing path. Fully bonded could potentially do it but that needs something at the other end as well. Load balancing isn't going to do what you want.

Personally I think for your specific scenario you aren't going to easily find a solution.


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Standard User hoopla
(committed) Tue 09-Feb-21 22:21:22
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: Pheasant] [link to this post]
 
So far, there have been some hitches in the path... For one thing, the FTTC isn't due to be installed until late next week. And for another, I can't remember where I put the spare Pi4 so I've dug out an old Pi3 to stand in for it.

So far, it seems to work well enough with only one WAN connection. A bit slower than going direct, but not a lot.

The speed difference is less than the normal variability of the 4G service. The latency is about 5ms slower. I'm guessing that the Pi4 will be better, when I remember where I put it.

Yes, I know it's pointless aggregating just one connection, but it gives me a feel for the overhead and helps me work out the setup.

I'll see if I can find another SIM card and try with two 4G connections.
Standard User hoopla
(committed) Tue 09-Feb-21 22:26:53
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: ian72] [link to this post]
 
This is fully bonded and there is something at the other end. That's the whole point of it.

There is a Pi running router software and connecting to the different WAN connections, stuffing all the traffic into a pipe that emerges in a VPN server in a well-connected hosting centre. The one I have available is in Germany, which may account for the few extra ms of ping..

I cancelled my London server a few months ago: the amount of hacking attempts on that was getting ridiculous.

Whether combining will work well remains to be seen, but it does work!
Standard User wifigeek
(knowledge is power) Tue 09-Feb-21 23:30:05
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: hoopla] [link to this post]
 
my 2x 4g gives about 170 down and 60 up aggregated across two 4G providers.

multipath tcp seems to have some clever schedulers to help deal with out of order packets etc - my two 4g links are very different - ee and three (three is terrible).

been fine even for videoconferencing. seems strange that it works, almost voodoo. but it does appear to work well.
Standard User hoopla
(committed) Sat 13-Feb-21 16:59:36
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: candlerb] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by candlerb:
In reply to a post by FarmerStuart:
USB network adapter or wifi on the newer ones?


Tagged VLANs into a switch? But if the OP knew what tagged VLANs were, then they probably wouldn't be asking questions here smile

I'll try to make one thing clear. Some of the advice offered previously has been about routers with dua moml-WAN ports. These are easy to deploy. However what happens with these is that any particular session (e.g. TCP session to fetch a web page) goes over one or other link - both inbound and outbound traffic for that session. This may be useful if there are several people in a household who are using the Internet simultaneously, and to balance their usage between them.

However this *can't* be used to combine bandwidth for a single session (e.g. a single large download), nor to use one link for upload and the other link for download as part of the same session. I think this is why the OP wants some sort of VPN solution, where two VPN connections are connected to some remote VPN node, and traffic is load-balanced between them.

Unfortunately, I don't think this is going to work well.

From my experience, probably the thing most likely to work would be two L2TP sessions with PPP-multilink across them, since this is the same technology used for "bonding" discrete PPP sessions. You need an L2TP termination point at the other end. AAISP offer an L2TP service for £10 per month, but I don't know if it supports multilink. Plus, you need a router which would do L2TP and multilink (possibly their "firebrick" device can do this), and you need to understand how to configure L2TP and multilink.

Maybe some VPN supplier offers a packaged solution for bonding that's easy to deploy. In which case, they'll also advise on what device or software is needed at the client side, to work with their VPN.

But to be honest, whatever you do, I don't think it will work well. You can't really combine two bad links to make one good link. You *can* combine two similar good links to make one good link with twice the throughput. FTTC and 4G have very different characteristics; if you divide your traffic between FTTC and 4G and find performance problems, it will be pretty much impossible to debug. TCP in particular can get very unhappy when packets arrive out-of-order, which will be the case when dividing packets between two links with very different latencies.

I think in this situation, multi-WAN with FTTC as primary and 4G as failover (or FTTC primary for some users and 4G primary for others) is simpler and easier to troubleshoot.


Your rather arrogant and dismissive comment set the scene.
You are indeed wrong. You can use this to combine two poor connections into one good one.
Standard User hoopla
(committed) Sat 20-Feb-21 12:15:31
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: Davey_H] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Davey_H:
Are you thinking of OpenMPTCProuter?

You can certainly run it on a RasPi
Update: I set it up and it seemed to work OK. Then I had to wait for the FTTC to arrive. That's started working and the results are every bit as good as I'd hoped.

Speedtest.net reports the latency as the latency of the fttc connection, the download speed is about 85% of the two separate download speeds combined, and the upload speed is more like 90% of the two upload speeds combined.

TBB speedtest reports even higher speeds (pretty much 100% of the combined speeds, up and down). Even for the single thread download it's significantly faster than the FTTC sync, but also reports higher latency.

I'm more than pleased with the results.
Standard User Davey_H
(regular) Sun 21-Feb-21 05:03:50
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: hoopla] [link to this post]
 
Excellent result.

Is this using your RasPi 3 or 4?
Standard User Pheasant
(committed) Sun 21-Feb-21 11:51:11
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Re: Combine connections using Pi


[re: hoopla] [link to this post]
 
Thats great to hear. Nice work!

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