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  >> Mobile Broadband (3G, 4G, 5G etc)


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Standard User expipexer
(learned) Fri 19-Nov-10 12:27:42
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
I dont care who you are mate. Just post as many details as you can about how you achieved this and any equipment used. Those of us who are being so frustrated with lack of or slow broadband speeds welcome any solutions.
Standard User therioman
(knowledge is power) Fri 19-Nov-10 13:06:40
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: expipexer] [link to this post]
 
Those mobile repeaters are illegal, so it isn't really for discussion.

However, with just 1 bar strength 3 are just fine right now:

[IMG]http://www.speedtest.net/result/1036724379.png[/IMG]
Standard User bosie
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sat 20-Nov-10 09:58:02
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: MarkHampshire] [link to this post]
 
The most I can get from O2 before all the shoppers arrive - then it just falls apart frown

My Broadband Speed Test

bosie


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Anonymous
(Unregistered)Sat 20-Nov-10 11:08:03
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: expipexer] [link to this post]
 
Hi,

The broadband service is from Three network as stated in the previous post.

The 10 dB gain panel antenna was bought from Ebay for just £30 and is mounted in the loft and carefully aligned with cell site down the valley.

Antennas can be bought with different gain ratings to suit need and come either as flat panel or yagi arrays.

They are directional and polarised (which basically means they have to be mounted in the correct plane and pointed as accurately as possible to the cell site.

I have mine connected via a short lead to the Huawei E122 modem (this and some other modems from the manufacturer have a small socket in the side to connect external antennas).

The modem is plugged directly into a D100 router.

Ethernet connects the router to the office computer network.

The router also provides WiFi access for the rest of the house.

The key to maximising on speed is ensuring that the antenna is properly aligned with the cell site with as few obstructions as possible in the way.

I achieved this by getting the precise geographic coordinates for the cell site and my own location, then aligning the antenna using a compass bearing.

The improvement in speed can be quite dramatic since you are effectively directing the signal in a beam (dongles themselves have a less than effective omnidirectional antenna built in).

Hope that helps to clarify.

CHRIS
Standard User MarkHampshire
(experienced) Sat 20-Nov-10 11:38:38
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
That's really useful - thanks.

Where we are, Vodafone has virtually no signal at all, Orange no 3G, we can get O2 and Three.

O2 is basically useless - horrendous packet loss despite a "strong" signal.

Three is more or less perfect. However it's HSDPA and I think the top speed is 3.6Mbps.

So we do pretty well with the standard dongle on the "wrong" side of the stone built house getting 2.8Mbps - reckon if I followed your advice I could get it up to 3.6Mbps since I also reckon I'm one of only a few people on that cell in this fairly rural area.

Now, if and when the mast goes to HSPA, I'll come back to this post... with just one antenna and doing what you've done I should be able to easily outperform about 5 bonded ASDL lines.

My Broadband Speed Test
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Sat 20-Nov-10 12:40:21
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: MarkHampshire] [link to this post]
 
Mark,

The maximum speed on the majority (if not all by now) of the Three network is 7.2 Mbps.

Some of the older modems that Three offered can only attain a maximum 3.6 Mbps without a firmware upgrade.

HSDPA refers to the downlink path whereas HSUPA refers to the uplink and collectively are collectively referred to as HSPA.

You should ask Three whether the network is 7.2 Mbps enabled in your area, If it is, then it seems likely your modem may need either an upgrade or replacement.

Three's current range of modems all support 7.2 Mbps.

If upgrading then ensure you get one with an antenna socket if you are going to set one up.

BEST,

CHRIS
Standard User lynn1221
(newbie) Mon 22-Nov-10 01:44:01
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
Never tried using 3G always on as I tend to use it when out onsite, though that can be online for considerable periods but that is only vpn to company network for mail, etc. http://www.ieboots.com/
Standard User MarkHampshire
(experienced) Sat 27-Nov-10 15:04:12
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
I spoke to Three about this today. They're really quite helpful... the cell I connect to is not the one I thought it was, actually, there is one a little bit nearer, and at the moment, the three cells in the area I can reach all offer 3.6Mbps.

The current intention is to upgrade them all to 7.2Mbps by end 2011 though I don't imagine the ones here are all that high up the list.

A cell is moved up the priority list if contention is an issue, but as I get 78% of the maximum speed available I don't imagine the local area is all that contended.

So it's a case of keeping an eye on the speed I currently get, and when that jumps up from 2.2Mbps to 2.8Mbps to something higher (anything over 3.6Mbps) then that's the time to invest the cash in getting an engineer to climb up on the roof and fit a directional antenna.

My Broadband Speed Test
Standard User rustianimal
(newbie) Thu 09-Dec-10 15:58:40
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
I am a specialist consulting in this field and I have to inform you that Mobile 3G Broadband is no serious alternative to ordinary landline broadband. In terms of what you want to achieve, you have a number of serious obstacles, the principal one being a guaranteed level of bandwidth for your video link. 3G is variable in its bandwidth allocation, so whilst it may say 7.5Gbit/s, that is the maximum you will get standing next to the 3G base station. The further away you get from the antenna, the less bandwidth it can carry. Any other obstructions will also reduce the bandwidth available until it stops working. Thus whilst the headline speed may be over 7Mbit/s in practice you will rarely get that. Plus you really need to check the uplink speed (HSUPA), which is often significantly less. Also, no UK mobile operator will give any guarantees on network speeds and reliability inside a building!

To operate a video link as you will be doing you will need an uplink speed of at least 400kbit/s with low latency/delay (to avoid picture and sound break up). I very much doubt that you will get that performance in practice from a 3G device in the circumstances you are describing. It is almost impossible to get a simple low-bandwidth Voice over IP (VoIP) connection working over a 3G device with any reliability.

Also, you mention using VNC, which usually requires a fixed IP address or DynDNS service enabled for it to function. Here in the UK, 3G service providers cycle the IP address of their devices on a regular basis (even hourly in some cases), thus even DynDNS will have a hard time keeping up. You will also find problems with 3G IP addresses on any system you transit that subscribes to the Real Time Blackhole (RBL) listings. These keep track of SPAM sources and 3G is a prime culprit here in the UK. You may find your Mum's machine is fine one minute and completely unresponsive the next because it has been allocated a new 3G IP address that is blacklisted and the systems you are working through block it until the next IP dynamic address change.

Also, if you keep the system on 24/7, you will very rapidly run into high data usage tariffs, even if you have an unlimited data contract as the mobile operator's Acceptable Usage limits are under 1Gbyte/month. When the limit is breached you, which won't take long with regular video sessions, you will find they either cap your usage for the remainder of the month, or dynamically throttle it so you can't use video on the uplink any more.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings, but I think you will have a great deal of grief trying to use 3G for this application. I know it may be difficult, but you would be best placed to approach the care home concerned and offer to pay for your Mum to have a landline and wireless broadband service installed for her to use.
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Thu 09-Dec-10 16:15:20
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: rustianimal] [link to this post]
 
I see this thread has gone off on a few tangents in my absence. Hopefully the law-breakers and law-enforcers can find a way to get on.

My original question is now moot as my mother now has a proper BT phone line and ADSL in her room.

Thanks to everyone who responded, though.

Simon
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