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  >> Mobile Broadband (3G, 4G, 5G etc)


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Standard User simoneves
(newbie) Sat 31-Jul-10 18:52:13
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How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[link to this post]
 
Sorry for the very general question, from somebody with no experience in mobile broadband (other than my iPhone here in the US), but I can find very little documentation about this aspect.

Is it possible to configure a Mobile Broadband connection as "always on"?

My elderly mother in the UK currently has DSL on a BT line and a router to maintain the Internet connection for her Mac Mini.

We are about to move her into residential care, which means giving up the phone line, but she wants to keep the computer for our regular webcams with her grandson, so it seems that the only solution is a 3G dongle.

I have been reading the docs for the dongles from various networks, and it seems that they all require manual connection and disconnection with a application (eg. 3's "EasyConnect"), just like a Dial-Up or non-router DSL connection.

Right now, I rely on her DSL connection being permanent, so that I can use LogMeIn and/or VNC to connect to her computer (which is left on permanently) and control it at any time, and I am worried that this will no longer be possible.

Is it possible to configure these connections (on a Mac running OS X 10.6) to be "always on", in other words to never disconnect based purely on time or lack of use, and to automatically reconnect if disconnect based on on network load or whatever?

Obviously I would have to take care that there was nothing on her computer which would cause her to go over her data allowance (although for now we would be using a PAYG setup with a hard limit).

Yours hopeful for some prompt opinions, as I am flying to the UK today, and plan to buy a dongle tomorrow (Sunday).

Thanks in advance,

Simon
Standard User simoneves
(newbie) Sat 31-Jul-10 18:54:33
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
...and any recommendations (positive or negative) for the network which can provide the best 3G Mobile Broadband in the Jesmond Dene area of Newcastle would be most welcome too.
Standard User Rockh
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sat 31-Jul-10 20:38:58
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
Jesmond is a heavily populated student area so 3G bb might not be too good on any of the networks with all the iphones and crackberries etc lying round the student flats.

Is it not possible to have their own landline phone in the accomodation ??

Mobile site finder shows the location of mobile basestations. You can specify postcode to select an exact location or if you don't have that use Benton Bank or Jesmond Road as the street as these are a couple of the main roads in that area.

[edit: more info]

Dave

Edited by Rockh (Sat 31-Jul-10 20:44:54)


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Standard User simoneves
(newbie) Sat 31-Jul-10 21:39:48
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Rockh] [link to this post]
 
Ugh... good point... frown

That site shows several UMTS (3G?) sites nearby, and all the major networks' coverage maps show full 3G/HSDPA coverage there, so I guess I just have to try it and see.

To be honest, the reports I've read so far of the various networks' performance are all universally terrible. I can but hope that only the worst is reported, and that it's not universal. Obviously performance depends on location (which will be fixed).

They all seem to be the same price for PAYG 3GB, so I think I'll try Three first (thus hopefully avoiding most of the iPhones and Crackberries) and if that's [censored] I'll take it back and try something else.

I don't know for certain about the phone line, but obviously if she CAN have a real line then I will just keep her on DSL, but that would get ugly as she's getting a temporary room at first and moving to a better one when available.

As long as we can still do reliable webcams... that's all she'll want.

Thoughts on the "always on" thing still welcomed, please!
Standard User Rockh
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sat 31-Jul-10 22:28:53
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
Yes, UMTS is 3G.
3 now share alot of backhaul / sites with T Mobile under a network sharing deal so that could impact on performance. The iphone is now available on 3.

Never tried using 3G always on as I tend to use it when out onsite, though that can be online for considerable periods but that is only vpn to company network for mail, etc.

I suppose it's a suck it and see situation. Could be try the dongle(s) until the permanent accommodation becomes available and then take it from there.

As it's currently the summer break, mobile BB performance might be considerably better since the students have gone home for a few months. Could degrade once they return in September.

Dave
Standard User simoneves
(newbie) Sat 31-Jul-10 22:43:29
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Rockh] [link to this post]
 
More excellent points. I shall indeed just have to suck it and see. Thanks again! smile
Standard User Rockh
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sat 31-Jul-10 22:52:03
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
No problem, have a good flight.

Dave
Standard User bosie
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sat 31-Jul-10 23:03:27
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
It might be worth looking at 3G routers, something along these lines:

http://www.option.com/en/products/products/wireless-...

bosie
Standard User simoneves
(newbie) Sun 01-Aug-10 02:11:06
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: bosie] [link to this post]
 
Hmmm...

Are they configurable to maintain the connection, whereas a simple dongle might not be? How about the Three Mifi thing (Huawei E585)? Would it also be able to do that, or do they ALL drop the 3G connection if they have no connected clients or those clients are not requiring traffic? The better 3G modems are probably OTT for mum! (and a lot more expensive!)

When the connection IS dropped, will the IP change? I use no-ip.com right now but would probably have to switch to LogMeIn or something with more reliable IP mapping.
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Sun 01-Aug-10 08:43:10
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
3G connections are often in "Walled Gardens" on private IP addresses (RFC 1918) and connect through a NAT interface. It is therefore difficult or impossible to run VNC or similar for inbound connections.
Standard User bosie
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sun 01-Aug-10 09:32:27
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
USB modems being what they are, you might have to remove the dongle from the router every now and then and pop it back in to restart the modem. In theory, provided the USB modem doesn't freeze, if the connection drops the wireless router should handle the reconnects. Most routers are configured using a web browser - no software required on the Mac itself. I'm not familiar with the Huawei E585 but if you buy a battery operated device make sure it continues to work when plugged into the mains (charging) - some don't. Unfortunately most of the dongles UK providers give out for free (or for a nominal charge) are generally of poor quality. For modem I use Option ICON 505 but it's not cheap (around £90). I like the Novatel brand as well for performance. If your mum's comfortable plugging the dongle into the Mac whenever she needs it, or selecting the MiFi network through Airport, plus a few steps to click connect you won't need an always on router.

do they ALL drop the 3G connection if they have no connected clients or those clients are not requiring traffic?


Not by design but if you set up the connection with idle disconnect options it would. The IP address is likely to change after a drop.

A good way to keep track of dynamic IP addresses is to get an account with DynDNS.com and install the update client software on the Mac. It runs unobtrusively in the background and starts up with the OS. I pay $15 per year for the Pro account just to keep my domains alive otherwise it needs a periodical reconfirmation of use by logging in to the account.

Sorry I don't have any direct experience using LogMeIn but that's the sort of the service I would go for. I use MobileMe (Back-to-my-Mac) for this purpose.

bosie

Edited by bosie (Sun 01-Aug-10 09:34:45)

Standard User ggremlin
(regular) Sun 01-Aug-10 11:34:11
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
is there any chance that the home may have an internet connection?
if its bt maybe they could/have enable a btopenzone wifi on their router.

worth checking for other openzone/fon etc connections nearby too.

(but these will also time out sessions... might need some keepallive packets, and also they have natted private addresses)
Standard User simoneves
(newbie) Sun 01-Aug-10 20:08:58
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Rockh] [link to this post]
 
OK, so I dropped the 49.99 (plus top-up) on a Huawei E585 (aka Three Mifi) today, and it's fabulous!

I haven't been able to test incoming connections yet, but outgoing is just fine. It seems to hang onto the 3G connection even when the computer is idle (or the time-out is longer than I waited), although it does "hang up" when there are no computers connected. Right now, it's happily hosting mum's Mac Mini, my Macbook Pro, and my iPhone 4. I tried speedtest.net several times during the afternoon and got a consistent 2.4Mb down and 1.4Mb up, which is nearly 3x what she gets with her existing (grandfathered-in) 1MB UKOnline/EasyNet DSL connection. I even tried Skype Videochat to my wife in California and it was noticeably better than on DSL (although used only 29MB for 5 minutes).

It gets a solid 5 bars of HSDPA 3G here in St Albans (where she's moving from). I just hope it works at least as well in Newcastle! smile

We shall see.
Standard User ggremlin
(regular) Mon 02-Aug-10 13:09:31
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
another way to do it rather than /always on/ would be something like wake on sms,
so you send an sms and it starts a comms programs for you.
Standard User Andrue
(knowledge is power) Mon 02-Aug-10 14:12:13
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by simoneves:
|To be honest, the reports I've read so far of the various networks' performance are all universally terrible. I can but hope that only the worst is reported, and that it's not universal. Obviously performance depends on location (which will be fixed).
Not surprising. A tower only has so much bandwidth available and it's shared between everyone within range. That has always been the achilles heel of mobile BB.

Andrue Cope
Brackley, UK

Just because he can smile
Standard User Adamant
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 01-Oct-10 19:48:28
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
Have you thought of the 3 Mi-Fi or a "proper" router like the Draytek Vigor 2820 into which you can plug a USB 3G Modem.

Adam
Sky Max LLU
Standard User Adamant
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 01-Oct-10 19:50:32
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
Oops,

just seen your post about this.

Where it hangs up, this is the wifi going into power saving mode.

You can download a non-offical firmware which allows you to disable the power saving

See http://www.shadwell.eu/paul_shadwells_weblog/2010/05... for details.

Adam

Adam
Sky Max LLU
Standard User MarkHampshire
(committed) Sun 03-Oct-10 06:08:37
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
We use 3 here and it's an "always on" connection in that the PC is set to redial if it drops. I never turn my PC off anyway.

We have a convoluted setup involving reconfiguring an ADSL modem to 192.168.0.254 instead of 192.168.0.1 enabling the PC it's plugged into to offer Internet connection sharing on 192.168.0.1

All that then needs doing is to fix the router to use 3's DNS servers and use a default gateway of the PC with the dongle plugged into it.

In this respect it's the same as our prior ADSL connection (only much quicker!)

My Broadband Speed Test
Standard User broadband_guru
(newbie) Sun 10-Oct-10 00:46:58
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be? *DELETED*


[re: MarkHampshire] [link to this post]
 
Post deleted by MrSaffron
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Sun 10-Oct-10 16:01:16
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be? *D


[re: broadband_guru] [link to this post]
 
Try spamming elsewhere, and getting your tables of providers correct first

Andrew Ferguson, [email protected]
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Wed 17-Nov-10 09:58:59
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
My own fixed "mobile broadband" has been permanently on for the past 18 months!

I work from home out in sticks amongst the Lancashire hills and opted for a mobile broadband service since BT wanted to charge in the order of £2,000 to run a line plus poles and even then wouldn't be able to offer more 05-1Mbps!

Three is my service provider.

The installation consists of a carefully aligned loft mounted panel antenna pointing down the valley to a mast just over four miles away, which feeds an E122 dongle connected to a D100 router hard wired via Ethernet to the office computers and providing a WiFi connection for the rest of the house.

I get a near consistent 5.5 - 6 Mbps download connection and 1.59 Mbps upstream (the latter being the maximum the Three network supports currently.

Since part of my work is news related and I frequently have need to appear in camera at the drop of a hat, I've used this installation very many times to feed in to the likes of the BBC, CNN and Al Jazeera using Skype.

Incidentally, the entire business operation here runs on cellular only connections and I've also installed a similarly arranged antenna and 3G/GSM booster for 02 which gives perfect phone reception in the house, office and grounds.

The above offered to show that with some ingenuity and a minimal cash outlay, even the most difficult operational conditions can be overcome.

Incidentally, my data and voice communication costs rarely exceed £70 a month.
Standard User adamtemp
(experienced) Wed 17-Nov-10 10:34:07
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
the use in the uk of a non approved 3g/gsm booster is against uk law wireless telegraphy act a good job you posted as an annon. O2 has no approved devices.

GLOBALNET now part of madasafish now part of plusnet With The same isp since 1995 ( now all part of BT)
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Wed 17-Nov-10 23:49:52
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: adamtemp] [link to this post]
 
My Orange BB (it's a dial up, to be honest) was OKish for a past year, but over the last month it's been all but unusable. Although I have good 3G signal, it immediately drops to GPRS, at even that at no more the 5Kb/s ! If it stays connected for more then 5 mins I am feeling very lucky !
Just downloading emails can take half a dozen attemots and 45 mins !!!
And it;'s the same even at 3 or 4 a.m. ....
[censored] is going on ?
Regards,
Martin
Standard User bosie
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 18-Nov-10 07:04:34
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: adamtemp] [link to this post]
 
I'm all for breaking the law on this. If we wait for authorities to legislate we will have a disadvantage to the rest of the world and also inhibit our freedom to live and work where we choose. Sometimes we need to force change when those in charge are letting us down (I'm thinking about the slow roll out of better technology in this country). Of course breaking the law also means facing the consequences if caught.

bosie
Standard User adamtemp
(experienced) Thu 18-Nov-10 08:29:40
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: adamtemp] [link to this post]
 
Link to relevant ofcom info http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/enforcement/spectru...

Cellular enhancers / boosters / repeaters
In the UK the use of any radio transmitting device is required to be either licensed or specifically exempted from licensing under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 2006 (WT Act 2006). For mobile telephones, the use of the spectrum by the network operators is licensed to cover the use of transmitters and repeaters, while user devices (i.e. handsets) are covered by a general exemption.

Repeater devices transmit or re-transmit in the cellular frequency bands. Only the mobile network operators are licensed to use equipment that transmits in these bands. Installation or use of repeater devices by anyone without a licence is a criminal offence under Section 8 of the WT Act 2006. Any person found guilty of installing or using such devices without a licence would be liable on conviction to a fine of up to £5000 and/or up to 51 weeks’ imprisonment (Six months in Scotland and Northern Ireland)

Anyone wishing to improve coverage in a particular area is advised to contact their network provider.
.


GLOBALNET now part of madasafish now part of plusnet With The same isp since 1995 ( now all part of BT)
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Fri 19-Nov-10 07:34:35
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: adamtemp] [link to this post]
 
Adam.

Regulation is one thing but operational requirement is quite another.

I could switch the thing off and dangle precariously from the top of the tree at the bottom of the garden to get a signal, but I've no doubt you'd quote Health & Safety legislation at me as well.

Word to the wise OM.

GET A LIFE!
Standard User MarkHampshire
(experienced) Fri 19-Nov-10 07:49:13
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
How the devil do you get 5 to 6Mbps downstream smile

On the legalities, people are often advise to rewire their phone lines even though this might breach BT's terms and render them liable to prosecution for tampering. BT say "it's OK for voice" - so, that's fine then.

Do you get HSPA? We have HSPDA @ 2.8Mbps and I reckon I could get this to near 3.6Mbps with a dedicated router and antenna on the "correct" side of the house.

3G radio waves over oxygen seem to offer better broadband conductivity than phone lines over similar distances, I'm not at all surprised by that.

My Broadband Speed Test
Standard User adamtemp
(experienced) Fri 19-Nov-10 08:05:34
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
If you have nothing to hide post your name.

My advise is do not break the law.

Note to Board owners please delete the annon post encouraging others to breach uk law.

P.s. I posted the comment about wta as advise to others of the possible risk.

GLOBALNET now part of madasafish now part of plusnet With The same isp since 1995 ( now all part of BT)
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Fri 19-Nov-10 08:26:47
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: MarkHampshire] [link to this post]
 
Mark,

Came as something of a surprise to me initially as well!

I'm using a 10dB flat panel antenna aligned very carefully with a mast some way down the valley. The dongle and router are mounted on the antenna bracket and connected with as short a lead as possible to minimise any loss. Ethernet runs from the router to the office computers and the Wifi covers the rest of the house.

Speed varies only slightly and generally hovers between 5.25 Mbps - 5.75 Mbs,

I obtained the precise geographic coordinates for the Three mast and used a GPS fix of my own coordinates to accurately align the antenna with the mast.

Hope that helps.

CHRIS
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Fri 19-Nov-10 08:37:53
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
Adam,

Perhaps you should read my posts more carefully.

My posts merely discussed my solution to various communication difficulties and at no time have encouraged anyone else to follow suit or break the law.

As a professional writer of some thirty years standing, I know about the law in such matters and you can absolutely guarantee I'm on the right side of it in respect to encouragement blah blah

There is such a thing as the right to free speech in this country and this allows me to comment on any topic I so choose to comment on.

If you don't like it, you don't have to read it.
Standard User expipexer
(learned) Fri 19-Nov-10 12:27:42
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
I dont care who you are mate. Just post as many details as you can about how you achieved this and any equipment used. Those of us who are being so frustrated with lack of or slow broadband speeds welcome any solutions.
Standard User therioman
(knowledge is power) Fri 19-Nov-10 13:06:40
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: expipexer] [link to this post]
 
Those mobile repeaters are illegal, so it isn't really for discussion.

However, with just 1 bar strength 3 are just fine right now:

[IMG]http://www.speedtest.net/result/1036724379.png[/IMG]
Standard User bosie
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Sat 20-Nov-10 09:58:02
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: MarkHampshire] [link to this post]
 
The most I can get from O2 before all the shoppers arrive - then it just falls apart frown

My Broadband Speed Test

bosie
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Sat 20-Nov-10 11:08:03
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: expipexer] [link to this post]
 
Hi,

The broadband service is from Three network as stated in the previous post.

The 10 dB gain panel antenna was bought from Ebay for just £30 and is mounted in the loft and carefully aligned with cell site down the valley.

Antennas can be bought with different gain ratings to suit need and come either as flat panel or yagi arrays.

They are directional and polarised (which basically means they have to be mounted in the correct plane and pointed as accurately as possible to the cell site.

I have mine connected via a short lead to the Huawei E122 modem (this and some other modems from the manufacturer have a small socket in the side to connect external antennas).

The modem is plugged directly into a D100 router.

Ethernet connects the router to the office computer network.

The router also provides WiFi access for the rest of the house.

The key to maximising on speed is ensuring that the antenna is properly aligned with the cell site with as few obstructions as possible in the way.

I achieved this by getting the precise geographic coordinates for the cell site and my own location, then aligning the antenna using a compass bearing.

The improvement in speed can be quite dramatic since you are effectively directing the signal in a beam (dongles themselves have a less than effective omnidirectional antenna built in).

Hope that helps to clarify.

CHRIS
Standard User MarkHampshire
(experienced) Sat 20-Nov-10 11:38:38
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
That's really useful - thanks.

Where we are, Vodafone has virtually no signal at all, Orange no 3G, we can get O2 and Three.

O2 is basically useless - horrendous packet loss despite a "strong" signal.

Three is more or less perfect. However it's HSDPA and I think the top speed is 3.6Mbps.

So we do pretty well with the standard dongle on the "wrong" side of the stone built house getting 2.8Mbps - reckon if I followed your advice I could get it up to 3.6Mbps since I also reckon I'm one of only a few people on that cell in this fairly rural area.

Now, if and when the mast goes to HSPA, I'll come back to this post... with just one antenna and doing what you've done I should be able to easily outperform about 5 bonded ASDL lines.

My Broadband Speed Test
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Sat 20-Nov-10 12:40:21
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: MarkHampshire] [link to this post]
 
Mark,

The maximum speed on the majority (if not all by now) of the Three network is 7.2 Mbps.

Some of the older modems that Three offered can only attain a maximum 3.6 Mbps without a firmware upgrade.

HSDPA refers to the downlink path whereas HSUPA refers to the uplink and collectively are collectively referred to as HSPA.

You should ask Three whether the network is 7.2 Mbps enabled in your area, If it is, then it seems likely your modem may need either an upgrade or replacement.

Three's current range of modems all support 7.2 Mbps.

If upgrading then ensure you get one with an antenna socket if you are going to set one up.

BEST,

CHRIS
Standard User lynn1221
(newbie) Mon 22-Nov-10 01:44:01
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
Never tried using 3G always on as I tend to use it when out onsite, though that can be online for considerable periods but that is only vpn to company network for mail, etc. http://www.ieboots.com/
Standard User MarkHampshire
(experienced) Sat 27-Nov-10 15:04:12
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
I spoke to Three about this today. They're really quite helpful... the cell I connect to is not the one I thought it was, actually, there is one a little bit nearer, and at the moment, the three cells in the area I can reach all offer 3.6Mbps.

The current intention is to upgrade them all to 7.2Mbps by end 2011 though I don't imagine the ones here are all that high up the list.

A cell is moved up the priority list if contention is an issue, but as I get 78% of the maximum speed available I don't imagine the local area is all that contended.

So it's a case of keeping an eye on the speed I currently get, and when that jumps up from 2.2Mbps to 2.8Mbps to something higher (anything over 3.6Mbps) then that's the time to invest the cash in getting an engineer to climb up on the roof and fit a directional antenna.

My Broadband Speed Test
Standard User rustianimal
(newbie) Thu 09-Dec-10 15:58:40
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: simoneves] [link to this post]
 
I am a specialist consulting in this field and I have to inform you that Mobile 3G Broadband is no serious alternative to ordinary landline broadband. In terms of what you want to achieve, you have a number of serious obstacles, the principal one being a guaranteed level of bandwidth for your video link. 3G is variable in its bandwidth allocation, so whilst it may say 7.5Gbit/s, that is the maximum you will get standing next to the 3G base station. The further away you get from the antenna, the less bandwidth it can carry. Any other obstructions will also reduce the bandwidth available until it stops working. Thus whilst the headline speed may be over 7Mbit/s in practice you will rarely get that. Plus you really need to check the uplink speed (HSUPA), which is often significantly less. Also, no UK mobile operator will give any guarantees on network speeds and reliability inside a building!

To operate a video link as you will be doing you will need an uplink speed of at least 400kbit/s with low latency/delay (to avoid picture and sound break up). I very much doubt that you will get that performance in practice from a 3G device in the circumstances you are describing. It is almost impossible to get a simple low-bandwidth Voice over IP (VoIP) connection working over a 3G device with any reliability.

Also, you mention using VNC, which usually requires a fixed IP address or DynDNS service enabled for it to function. Here in the UK, 3G service providers cycle the IP address of their devices on a regular basis (even hourly in some cases), thus even DynDNS will have a hard time keeping up. You will also find problems with 3G IP addresses on any system you transit that subscribes to the Real Time Blackhole (RBL) listings. These keep track of SPAM sources and 3G is a prime culprit here in the UK. You may find your Mum's machine is fine one minute and completely unresponsive the next because it has been allocated a new 3G IP address that is blacklisted and the systems you are working through block it until the next IP dynamic address change.

Also, if you keep the system on 24/7, you will very rapidly run into high data usage tariffs, even if you have an unlimited data contract as the mobile operator's Acceptable Usage limits are under 1Gbyte/month. When the limit is breached you, which won't take long with regular video sessions, you will find they either cap your usage for the remainder of the month, or dynamically throttle it so you can't use video on the uplink any more.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings, but I think you will have a great deal of grief trying to use 3G for this application. I know it may be difficult, but you would be best placed to approach the care home concerned and offer to pay for your Mum to have a landline and wireless broadband service installed for her to use.
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Thu 09-Dec-10 16:15:20
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: rustianimal] [link to this post]
 
I see this thread has gone off on a few tangents in my absence. Hopefully the law-breakers and law-enforcers can find a way to get on.

My original question is now moot as my mother now has a proper BT phone line and ADSL in her room.

Thanks to everyone who responded, though.

Simon
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Thu 09-Dec-10 16:19:18
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
@rustianimal... interesting your point about 3G devices being randomly assigned possibly dodgy IPs.

I am currently in Singapore on business, and I got a local StarHub SIM for my jailbroken and unlocked iPhone 4. For several days, I could not send e-mail from the phone to my wife, as it would always be bounced back to me as spam. Turns out the underlying IP (not the NAT'd one my phone actually got) was hugely black-listed, and because Google was tagging my sent e-mails with both IPs, my own domain ISP was rejecting the e-mails.
Standard User Ashwini
(newbie) Sun 12-Dec-10 19:29:52
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
That is a major concern using dynamic IPs these days. More and more spams are generated using those IPs getting blacklisted quite often.
Coming back to the point with mobile broadband, you can achieve it with the help of router/modem or so but it can't be cent percent always on.

Anonymous
(Unregistered)Fri 21-Jan-11 22:05:03
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Re: How "Always On" can a Mobile Broadband connection be?


[re: adamtemp] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by adamtemp:
If you have nothing to hide post your name.

My advise is do not break the law.

Note to Board owners please delete the annon post encouraging others to breach uk law.

P.s. I posted the comment about wta as advise to others of the possible risk.


Some people really think their sh*t doesn't stink!!
Christ, how much harm do you think he's causing out in the middle of nowhere? Anon is managing to be employed and from the sounds of it, employe others too, so lighten up.
I've just bought a house miles from anywhere and I'll be buying a 3G repeaters to boost the signal in my grounds.
Standard User 29smith
(newbie) Sat 22-Jan-11 09:38:38
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Always On can a Mobile Broadband connection be? *DELETED*


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
Post deleted by billford
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Thu 25-Aug-11 16:03:32
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Re: Always On can a Mobile Broadband connection be? *DELETED


[re: 29smith] [link to this post]
 
Hello "anonymous", I have read this exchange with interest ...

- If I have read it correctly, you may not have "broken the law" at all; you have simply added a directional antenna to an existing piece of "legal" hardware without modification?

- if so you may be "legal" as you are still "transmitting" the same amount of power; that is your "box" has no knowledge of its antenna so carries on as if you still had the original whip (?) antenna attached.

What your new antenna does for you is to focusing most of that transmited power onto the tower and decreases the aperature of your receiver's "visibility" to a circular locality closer to the tower, thereby increasing its sensitivity.

What matters is your Effective Radiated Power - look it up:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effective_radiated_power


As the OFcom spec does not give ERP (or gain over EIRP) only a power out of the transmit section of the "mobile" (maximum permissable is 2W for a Class 1 device and 250mW for a class 2 device) it becomes difficult to decide if changing the antenna will constitute "breaking the law". It will all depend on the efficencies in the system and the class of the system you are altering the antenna on; for example if you are using a class 2 device (probable) and you use an antenna with 10dB gain over isotropic (ie something like a 4 or 6 element "yagi") then you are probably still "within the law" as you are now only radiating the same power as a class 1 device. Interestingly, you will have increased the range of both the transmission distance and reception distance of your class 2 device by a factor of about three times, which, from your description of what you have done, sounds about right?

Cheers SimonH.
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