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Standard User davidc01
(newbie) Fri 26-Jun-20 09:27:16
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: davidc01] [link to this post]
 
Still got my magic bandwidth this morning - it's such a relief! If this stays stable I might even ditch my 350MB virgin connection that somehow has latency that reaches seconds at times.

At some point I'll switch back to the MR600 and see if I can replicate the bandwidth by forcing Band 1 on that. I wish I knew the trick to getting the MR600 to actually use the bands I pick! I think once they are on the same bands the speeds are basically the same between them.

For people looking for further comparisons:
MR600 has no bridge mode, so if you're like me and intending on connecting it directly to your gateway (either as primary or secondary), then you have to jump through hoops.
However, the B535 has limited settings outside of Bridge mode. e.g. right now I have it on a static IP so I can switch gateways on my network whenever I want, however, as far as I can tell there is no way to set the subnet. The interface is nicer, but it feels limited by comparison.

MR600 has the band selection in the interface in the beta firmware (and they're still releasing firmware!), however for me this doesn't really work as intended, as previously explained. Also, there are some band combinations that it doesn't support for 4G+. E.g. it won't do 1+3, which is important on the Three network.
The B535 has no band selection in the interface, but the Android HUA Ctrl app, and the PC/NAS application LTE H-Monitor are great for analysing your signal. For me this would be the deciding factor between them. When I was getting my external antenna fitted on the roof it was a nightmare with the MR600. Sometimes it seems to need a reboot for a band change or antenna movement to have an impact... but you don't really know because you don't have good read-outs. With the apps for the B535 I was back on the roof last night with mobile phone in hand, looking to see if I could get a better SINR - not great, but a way better solution.

I seem to be in the middle of about 5 towers, which is possibly why I have so many issues, but if you are having similar problems, the analytics on the B535 make it the winner so far - that plus it has a proper bridge mode.

I'll report back when I've tested the B535 for longer.
Standard User jchamier
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 26-Jun-20 09:39:48
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: davidc01] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by davidc01:
I think the only network where auto has got me best results has been Vodafone, bur after tonight's shock jump in bandwidth, I'd be tempted to revisit that thought too.
Fascinating. Just be aware that in higher load situations, you may find yourself with very poor service. The mast will think your device is faulty, if it advertises it supports 4 bands, but you've artifically limited it to 2.

Lockdown / home working has put a lot more load in residential areas that previously was spread around the area on lots of masts. In my town the town centre mast has many more bands and capacity, but the residential areas have a lot less capacity. This was great until lockdown arrived!

20 years of broadband connectivity since 1999 trial - Live BQM
Standard User davidc01
(newbie) Fri 26-Jun-20 13:06:55
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: jchamier] [link to this post]
 
I did my best to be "scientific" about my approach to trying all this out, but I keep getting results that completely throw me, like the Band 1 one. There are simply too many variables to adjust, as far as I can tell - particularly with signal reflections etc. Moving an external antenna a fraction can even make a big difference. The networks being all over the place at the moment because of lockdown does not help the scientific method much either, as it it's hard to have a "control" to base changes on.

My suspicion is that auto works well on one mast at a time with multiple bands. I think Vodafone I normally connect to the closer mast with more bands and it does a good job of picking. With EE the closer masts are terrible and by chance the channel 1 seems to be great on one further away.
Three has been all over the place - but I think as you say, that is because its such a popular choice for home 4G broadband and its getting overloaded.

What's also interesting is that custom band selection gets me better bandwidth than my Samsung S10 as well - even if I stand on my roof next to my external antenna and hold my phone up high...
My neighbours must think I'm crazy... the lengths I go for better ping times!


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Standard User jchamier
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 26-Jun-20 13:39:16
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: davidc01] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by davidc01:
My neighbours must think I'm crazy... the lengths I go for better ping times!

Ha, don't forget masts on some networks are being updated to MIMO, so you have multiple transmit antenna and multiple receive antenna. Written an 4T4R for example. The newer handsets have this, e.g. your S10 will certainly support. The "cheaper" design home routers will not have provision for this.

The MIMO technology increases capacity especially at the distance ("cell edge") by helping against the multipath effect of high frequencies.

20 years of broadband connectivity since 1999 trial - Live BQM
Standard User davidc01
(newbie) Fri 26-Jun-20 13:50:23
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: jchamier] [link to this post]
 
Yes, the better tech in my mobile was why I was surprised I got such better bandwidth with the router than my phone.
I guess antennas near me don't support it or I'm just in a weird dead spot.

I'd be interested to understand how the automatic band choice optimisation works with multiple towers and bands available. Is there a source on this kind of info that an average geek could understand (rather than a mobile network expert)?
I suspect understanding it wouldn't help me much in my quest for better bandwidth, however smile
Standard User jchamier
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 26-Jun-20 14:32:29
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: davidc01] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by davidc01:
Is there a source on this kind of info that an average geek could understand (rather than a mobile network expert)?
I've seen a 700page book at around £80 on Amazon, which I can't find the link for now. Something along the lines of "understanding LTE".

Generally I would see if you can talk to the guy that owns this site, https://pedroc.co.uk/ - seems to know a lot!

20 years of broadband connectivity since 1999 trial - Live BQM

Edited by jchamier (Fri 26-Jun-20 14:32:40)

Standard User buggerlugs
(member) Fri 26-Jun-20 16:07:23
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: jchamier] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by jchamier:
In reply to a post by davidc01:
My neighbours must think I'm crazy... the lengths I go for better ping times!

Ha, don't forget masts on some networks are being updated to MIMO, so you have multiple transmit antenna and multiple receive antenna. Written an 4T4R for example. The newer handsets have this, e.g. your S10 will certainly support. The "cheaper" design home routers will not have provision for this.

The MIMO technology increases capacity especially at the distance ("cell edge") by helping against the multipath effect of high frequencies.


As a matter of interest, is upgrading mast tech to MIMO just a hardware upgrade or is available bandwidth at a mast increased during these MIMO upgrades as a matter of course?

Just wondering because surely with better connectivity of MIMO wouldn't that automatically increase the availability of bandwidth to users on that mast?
Standard User jchamier
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 26-Jun-20 16:41:38
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: buggerlugs] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by buggerlugs:
Just wondering because surely with better connectivity of MIMO wouldn't that automatically increase the availability of bandwidth to users on that mast?

My understanding is getting the bandwidth "into the air" is more of a challenge than providing it. Most well specified masts will have multiple gigabit connections, some will have 10 gigabit. The 5G rollout will need 10 gigabit connections.

Some masts will have only one gigabit connection and be serving a neighbourhood of 20,000 people. Of course we have no idea how many customers for that network will be in that neighbourhood. They could all be on the competition!

20 years of broadband connectivity since 1999 trial - Live BQM
Standard User buggerlugs
(member) Fri 26-Jun-20 18:57:25
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: jchamier] [link to this post]
 
So a mast can effectively have 5 different carriers on it with separate radio gear and they all share the same pipes of "available bandwidth" so to speak??
Standard User jchamier
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 26-Jun-20 19:04:31
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Re: TP-Link MR600 vs Huawei B535


[re: buggerlugs] [link to this post]
 
That is my understanding, look at some of the pictures on that site. You’re talking about installations of hardware that run into hundreds of thousands of pounds.

20 years of broadband connectivity since 1999 trial - Live BQM

Edited by jchamier (Fri 26-Jun-20 19:05:26)

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