Technical Discussion
  >> Home Networking, Internet Connection Sharing, etc.


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.


Pages in this thread: 1 | [2] | 3 | (show all)   Print Thread
Standard User jchamier
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 05-Feb-21 18:55:17
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home netwoek


[re: astanden] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by astanden:
Is it worth it?
If you only access major websites and don't need to access obscure asian websites (where the IPv4 has run out), then you won't tell a difference.

Zen won't switch you to v6, they provide both v4 and v6 at the same time. Sky and BT's internet service have been doing for a while. Virgin Media, Plusnet and others are still not able to supply.

With a v6 address you could access http://loopsofzen.co.uk/ which is a game only on v6 to show the point. smile

21 years of broadband connectivity since 1999 trial - Live BQM
Standard User E300
(member) Sat 06-Feb-21 10:03:40
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home netwoek


[re: Michael_Chare] [link to this post]
 
Personally I wouldn't say IPv6 is complicated, if anything its simpler than IPv4 as it removes any need to get involved with port forwarding, port triggering, NAT or UPnP, ALGs etc to get some devices to work. IPv6 to IPv6 works as the Internet was always intended to work.

In my own network almost 60% of traffic now is by IPv6. It's simplified things for me like SIP phones that no longer have to negotiate NAT and multiple SIP phones work without issue as they all have their own routable IP address.

Currently IPv6 isn't required of course, you can get along with IPv4 just fine, but if it is available, why not use it and be ready for when it might be required?

A few years ago if someone said the analogue phone system was going to be switched off and we will be all VoIP they'd be laughed at, but we are 4 years away from having no landline phones anymore, it will all be VoIP. VoIP has to use various hacks over IPv4 and can be troublesome and unreliable negotiating NAT, and also is practically impossible over CGNAT which more and more ALTNETs and mobile companies have no option but use to enable IPv4, so to facilitate a smoother transition to VoIP for millions of people IPv6 is going to end being a requirement, not an option.
Standard User dect
(fountain of knowledge) Sat 06-Feb-21 12:20:00
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home network


[re: E300] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by E300:
I wouldn't say IPv6 is complicated
I wish I could say the same, I've never been able to find a good dummies guide to IPv6


Register (or login) on our website and you will not see this ad.

Standard User Vista2003
(newbie) Sat 06-Feb-21 13:26:54
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home netwoek


[re: astanden] [link to this post]
 
Hi, I've recently switched over to Zen and have asked them to enable IPv6 on my line.
In terms of devices, most already support IPv6 over a decade ago and will automatically obtain IPv6 addresses (iirc, IPv6 could be enabled on Windows XP and was enabled by default in Windows Vista, this is over 14 years ago). Android may have a bit of a problem if the router is using DHCPv6 instead of SLAAC so if you have Android devices, check this in your router settings.

Zen (and most ISP implementations) of IPv6 is in dual-stack which means you'll have both an IPv4 and v6 address assigned to you so even if some devices are missing support for the new protocol, you're unlikely to notice anything.
Standard User prlzx
(experienced) Sat 06-Feb-21 13:39:08
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home netwoek


[re: astanden] [link to this post]
 
If you are using the Fritzbox is it not already on by default (as dual-stack) ?

When I switched from IDNet the router was sent with an automatic setup, so I just renumbered the LAN IPv4 and populated the DHCP reservations to match my home subnet. And the SSID for Wi-Fi.

I can't remember if I had to email or use the Zen account area to enabling the /48 delegation (for the router to use to number LAN IPv6 subnets).

As regards the IPv6 I don't have to think about which it uses to reach external sites, as I'm connecting by name and DNS takes care of that. I would not see any benefit from disabling access to the part of the Internet where growth is possible by turning off IPv6.

I didn't need to change anything on the client devices as they receive auto configuration from the network.



prlzx on Zen: FTTC (VDSL) at ~40Mbps / 10Mbps
with IP4/6 (no v6? - not true Internet)
Standard User prlzx
(experienced) Sat 06-Feb-21 13:59:44
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home netwoek


[re: prlzx] [link to this post]
 
I've made this a separate post for reference info on the broader situation

You can read more about the state of the remaining IPv4 space in our region here
https://www.ripe.net/manage-ips-and-asns/ipv4/ipv4-pool

In essence we reached the points where members were limited to a one-time allocation of:
~1000 addresses since Sep 2012 and then
~250 addresses since Oct 2019.
Since Nov 2019 it is now based on allocations being returned to pool for recycling and members can also offer ranges for transfers.

ISPs will continue consume or recycle their own allocations of legacy IP space internally, but ultimately any further growth will require increasing use of IPv6.

Because of the growth in virtualisation and containerisation of servers, it is likely that in future larger proportions of the IPv4 space will end up on servers, until home users only have NATted IPv4 on their router.
IPv4 space is already considered an asset when older companies are dissolved or brought out.

The protocols already exist for an ISP to run pure IPv6 in their distribution network.to the customer router with IPv4 being tunneled (such as NAT64 and DNS64), but mostly transparent as regards outbound connections and replies.

In any case you are likely to see dual stack on the LAN for the forseeable future, as it was always going to be a gradual migration with varying proportions of the parallel stacks.

The Internet Society has links to various statistics tracking adoption.



prlzx on Zen: FTTC (VDSL) at ~40Mbps / 10Mbps
with IP4/6 (no v6? - not true Internet)

Edited by prlzx (Sat 06-Feb-21 14:12:05)

Standard User aidanh
(newbie) Sat 06-Feb-21 14:27:35
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home netwoek


[re: Vista2003] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Vista2003:
Android may have a bit of a problem if the router is using DHCPv6 instead of SLAAC so if you have Android devices, check this in your router settings.


Ideally your router will do both DHCPv6 and SLAAC to have the best compatibility because there are some devices that only support one but not the other and devices that support both won't break (you'll just have an auto-configured address from SLAAC in addition to whatever DHCPv6 assigns). Doing DHCPv6 makes ipv6 purists cry but it will give you less headaches if you do both DHCPv6 and SLAAC.
Standard User prlzx
(experienced) Sat 06-Feb-21 15:12:10
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home netwoek


[re: Vista2003] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by Vista2003:
… Android may have a bit of a problem if the router is using DHCPv6 instead of SLAAC so if you have Android devices, check this in your router settings …

Yes, people have expressed frustration with this design choice. However it's not so much "instead of" as "along side";
SLAAC should be working as soon as the router starts advertising the network (prefix) then DHCPv6 can be added with the side benefit of being able to specify a pool range which lends itself to the more compact representations.

Myself, I'm quite partial to a (host interface address) pool range of ::d:1 to ::d:ff
as that easily extends past any reasonable size for any given subnet given you could expand the upper end to ::d:fff (4K) or ::d:ffff (64K) without renumbering.



prlzx on Zen: FTTC (VDSL) at ~40Mbps / 10Mbps
with IP4/6 (no v6? - not true Internet)

Edited by prlzx (Sat 06-Feb-21 23:57:29)

Standard User astanden
(member) Sat 06-Feb-21 16:15:32
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home netwoek


[re: astanden] [link to this post]
 
Thankyou all for some interesting replies.

So, I guess there’s no real need to switch IPv6 on, but when Imdo, it should ‘just work’.

Thanks again

iMac (Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, Late 2015) 3.3 GHz Intel Core i7 16GB Ram 2TB Fusion drive
iPad Air (6th Gen) 32 GB
iPhone 11 128GB
Zen Unlimited Fibre 2 80/20
AVM FRITZ!Box 7530

AOL=>Freeserve=>Zen=>O2=>BT FTTC=>Zen FTTC
Standard User E300
(member) Sat 06-Feb-21 16:28:32
Print Post

Re: IPv6 home network


[re: dect] [link to this post]
 
I think the biggest issue with anyone wanting to understand IPv6 is the numbers are so big. IPv6 is 128 bits which is a huge number, and to give it some context, it is suggested that the IPv6 address space is 100 times the number of atoms on the surface of the earth!

However in practical terms the ISP tends to control the first 64 bits, and we (the LAN) get the remaining 64 bits, so those numbers aren't so big. Think of it as a total of 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 subnets for all the ISPs in the world to hand out, with each of those subnets giving the end user the possibility to assign IP addresses to 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 devices. Subnets always have 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 addresses, i.e. they are always 64 bit (or recommended to be), which differs of course to IPv4 which can subnets of various sizes, so IPv6 loses that complexity.

Also as IPv6 has so many addresses then subnets of 256 and 65,536 are routinely given to everyone, although most people will only use one.

So I think personally the complexity comes in with the notations and how they are written, because the numbers are so big they are written in HEX and it's all a bit more complex. If you understand that notation however and bits and powers of 2 its not to hard to see what is happening and it then becomes a lot easier than IPv4 which can have different subnetting etc.
Pages in this thread: 1 | [2] | 3 | (show all)   Print Thread

Jump to