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Standard User JT_WHC
(newbie) Mon 17-Feb-20 11:13:39
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Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[link to this post]
 
Apologies if in the wrong forum...

I have a few questions on the upcoming USO in March

I live in a small Highland village with approx 50 houses over a long stretch of c. 10 miles
We have max 0.5mb connections for BT broadband
A mobile mast is expected to go live within 3 months which will provide 4g broadband

For our BT landline connections, we currently get a maximum of 0.5mb due to the exchange being an Activate Exchange which has no date for being upgraded to 21CN. We have no plan-for-a-plan for any form of fibre implementation (R100 may deliver in 3+ years?)

I am therefore encouraging the village to exercise their right under the USO
I know that OR are expected to consider the upgrade costs up to £3,400 but have seen confused messages regarding what happens if the USO upgrade cost is greater than £3,400 per premise
The OR consultation mentioned an industry fund if OR say the cost is greater than £3,400. Others suggest the property owner would have to pay any costs above £3,400

1 - Are OR obligated to consider all houses in the area when assessing the costs of a USO upgrade (or only those that have applied)?

2 - Who pays for the USO upgrade if the cost is greater than £3,400?

3 - If 4g broadband is available then do OR pay for the 4g broadband installation as they are effectively replacing the BT broadband connection? Note that we know the 4g coverage will not reach everywhere as explained in the 4g computer-projected coverage area

Thanks in advance for any info

John
Standard User ian72
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Mon 17-Feb-20 12:22:49
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: JT_WHC] [link to this post]
 
If you have a mast coming then BT will possibly say that satisfies USO. As far as costs it would be the router and monthly costs - no different to what you would pay for if fixed line broadband was available so no, BT wouldn't pay for it. Afraid I don't know the answers to your other questions.
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 17-Feb-20 12:39:53
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: JT_WHC] [link to this post]
 
IMPORTANT

USO falls on BT and not Openreach. Openreach will quote and do whatever work BT decides it wants in relation to USO, but spending is down to BT

The industry fund will be what is used for the up to £3,400 properties. Beyond that is the householder

50 houses and 10 miles means even if flat a single 4G mast is not enough and FTTP costs are going to be high.

R100 is probably the best bet still.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.


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Standard User JT_WHC
(newbie) Mon 17-Feb-20 14:29:11
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
couple of thoughts

1 - there is a fibre cable that has been laid to our local exchange that connects to the mast so is it possible to share the physical fibre cable even if they cannot share their broadband connection?

2 - will BT be obligated to pay for any aspect of the 4G installation if we exercise our right under USO?
Standard User ian72
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Mon 17-Feb-20 15:05:47
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: JT_WHC] [link to this post]
 
1 - It will specifically for mast backhaul, this will almost certainly be a different type of implementation and unlikely to be shareable. The infrastructure is likely designed differently to that for FTTP

2 - No. 4G I think will be considered a viable alternative considering how cheaply you can get it - in fact in many cases it may be cheaper than fixed line broadband even with "unlimited" data. The only part BT might have to pay for is infrastructure but if a mast is already planned then they wouldn't need to do that either.

Edited by ian72 (Mon 17-Feb-20 15:06:17)

Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 17-Feb-20 15:20:33
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: ian72] [link to this post]
 
If 4G can deliver the 10 Mbps connection speed down and 1 Mbps up then it will be considered job done.

For most people this means you apply under USO and they will say, sign up to this 4G plan. Only if the signal is marginal will fitting an external aerial to the property be considered.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Tue 18-Feb-20 12:59:25
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
If 4G can deliver the 10 Mbps connection speed down and 1 Mbps up then it will be considered job done.


Unfortunately I think that will be exactly what happens for most USO properties. I use 4G, which is (usually) above USO levels, but well below any "superfast" level. The view from politicians will be "job done", and they will push on with FTTP to areas which already have "superfast" or "ultrafast" broadband available. Those with USO level connections will be left further and further behind.
Standard User MCM
(knowledge is power) Tue 18-Feb-20 15:46:57
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: sheephouse] [link to this post]
 
Those with USO level connections will be left further and further behind.
Nevertheless for many thousands, currently 687,643, the USO minima of 10/1 will be above what they are currently able to achieve. If you think the USO levels should be higher then lobby your MP to press for them to be increased and then be prepared for everyone to pay more for their connection to cover the cost.

Note that £3,400 is currently equivalent to 17 years line rental.
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Tue 18-Feb-20 16:02:03
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MCM] [link to this post]
 
Yes you're probably right - we shouldn't make anyone with cheap gigabit connections that have been subsidised by the taxpayer via BDUK pay more.
After all, those with sub-USO connections will be grateful for 10Mbps which will of course allow them to fully take part in all the online activities available (unless they want to stream HD, or play Stadia, or Skype, or work from home, etc.).
Standard User MCM
(knowledge is power) Tue 18-Feb-20 16:22:53
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: sheephouse] [link to this post]
 
May I ask have you looked in to seeing if you can obtain better speeds? I ask because I live in central London, south of the river, on a long EO line. Exchange based ADSL2, VDSL (FTTC) commercially non-viable and no BDUK. No Virgin Media. Neither Lambeth nor GLC prepared to help.

What I did was get together with others and with some help from Openreach we paid for the installation of an AIO cabinet to supply our homes. Openreach contributed what they would have spent if a commercial upgrade, we found the remaining £18,000. We've enjoyed the benefits of VDSL connections now for the last 3½ years.
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Tue 18-Feb-20 17:08:23
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MCM] [link to this post]
 
Yes, we have looked at many and various solutions. We tried a CFP, but due to the way the BDUK FTTC rollout was done they left small groups of houses around the village on EO ADSL lines (BT wanted to FTTP using remote nodes but were vetoed on cost - then they dropped that approach anyway). For CFP they split the houses into small groups of about half a dozen, which were then not viable. We also weren't eligible for vouchers as FTTP from Gigaclear was "imminent" - that was 4+ years ago. I've looked at leased lines - I was quoted £325+VATpm with capped ECC for a 30Mbps line (on a 100Mbps bearer), but that was too expensive for me at the time (I had a budget of £250). I enquired again recently, but it has gone up significantly!
I did get BT Business to look at FTTPoD even though I'm technically not eligible (as I'm EO), but they refused to quote as it was an 11 mile build! It might be less now, as they have some FTTP new build only 5 or 6 miles away.
There are no FW providers in the area, so the only option is 4G until Gigaclear get here (due to finish the build by the end of 2018).
But it is OK as we'll get USO in a month or two - job done.
Standard User uno
(knowledge is power) Tue 18-Feb-20 17:16:58
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: sheephouse] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by sheephouse:
I was quoted £325+VATpm with capped ECC for a 30Mbps line (on a 100Mbps bearer), but that was too expensive for me at the time (I had a budget of £250). I enquired again recently, but it has gone up significantly!


Did you shop around for that or just re-quote with the same company as you asked before out of interest?

Matt

uno Communications
t: 0333 773 7700
uno Speedtest
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Tue 18-Feb-20 17:23:04
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: uno] [link to this post]
 
I did shop around a bit recently, but not a lot as I don't really want a 3 year contract now. Rather than spend a small fortune on a leased line I'm increasingly tempted to to use the money to retire a few years early.
Standard User uno
(knowledge is power) Tue 18-Feb-20 17:25:35
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: sheephouse] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by sheephouse:
I did shop around a bit recently, but not a lot as I don't really want a 3 year contract now. Rather than spend a small fortune on a leased line I'm increasingly tempted to to use the money to retire a few years early.


Certainly agree with that... and you don't know what is around the corner. Something could appear a few months in; would be good to be able to predict the future.

Matt

uno Communications
t: 0333 773 7700
uno Speedtest
Standard User dect
(experienced) Tue 18-Feb-20 17:27:54
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: uno] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by uno:
In reply to a post by sheephouse:
I did shop around a bit recently, but not a lot as I don't really want a 3 year contract now. Rather than spend a small fortune on a leased line I'm increasingly tempted to to use the money to retire a few years early.


Certainly agree with that... and you don't know what is around the corner. Something could appear a few months in; would be good to be able to predict the future.

Matt
+1
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Tue 18-Feb-20 17:49:00
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: dect] [link to this post]
 
If I retire early I'll be able to stop worrying about how to work from home as a software engineer with poor broadband, and sit back and watch Netflix on my 4K TV instead. Oh, wait...
Standard User dect
(experienced) Tue 18-Feb-20 18:06:04
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: sheephouse] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by sheephouse:
If I retire early I'll be able to stop worrying about how to work from home as a software engineer with poor broadband, and sit back and watch Netflix on my 4K TV instead. Oh, wait...
I get the dilemma, If I was you I would go out and enjoy those extra retirement years, hopefully sometime in the future good broadband will be available for Netflix on your 4K TV laugh
Standard User dect
(experienced) Tue 18-Feb-20 18:20:03
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: JT_WHC] [link to this post]
 
I think it all comes down to what 4G service is or will be available to you, if the 4G service is considered to meet the USO minimum requirement then the likely hood is those properties will only get a 4G router for the £3,400
Standard User MCM
(knowledge is power) Tue 18-Feb-20 18:22:13
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: sheephouse] [link to this post]
 
You've clearly done as much as you can. Am sorry that it has been to no good effect.

I can't help wondering, and this is in no way aimed at yourself, just how much the state should pay for/subsidise expensive installations such as yours. Properties without main drainage have to pay the full cost as do those who live along an unadopted road that a council decrees should be adopted once the residents have paid to bring it up to standard. Nevertheless I hope that either a commercial company such as Gigaclear or Openreach decide to invest in your area and if not that a community organisation similar to B4RN takes up the slack.
Standard User burble
(member) Tue 18-Feb-20 18:30:44
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: dect] [link to this post]
 
With BT wanting to switch off copper within 7 years it's only a matter of time before all have FTTP.
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Tue 18-Feb-20 19:45:22
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MCM] [link to this post]
 
Well, I'm not sure it *should* be expensive. My house is less than 20 yards from a chamber where the fibre runs through on its way to/from the exchange. The ducts are clear all the way.
By car I can be at Aztec West (Bristol) in 25 minutes. and I'm 4 miles in each direction from fibre enable towns. The fact that the nearest place to connect fibre to is (was?) 11 miles away isn't because I'm remote, it is because BT/BDUK chose not to have any closer.
Also, if Fastershire had allowed BT to move all the bundles to FTTC I expect I would have got 18Mbps, and much faster upload than ADSL Max allows, 5 years ago.
Additionally, broadband is different to mains drainage. We don't have mains drainage, but I can(and have) install my own sewage treatment plant. I can't provide my own internet, as there is nowhere to connect it to. If I had backhaul available I could do the rest, but it isn't available.
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Tue 18-Feb-20 19:46:41
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: burble] [link to this post]
 
No, they are not switching off copper - they are switching off POTS. It will be VoIP over ADSL2+.
Standard User MCM
(knowledge is power) Tue 18-Feb-20 21:43:32
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: sheephouse] [link to this post]
 
We don't have mains drainage, but I can(and have) install my own sewage treatment plant
You may have missed my point. I was saying that those who are told by their water authority/council that they are to have main sewage installed are required to pay the cost, it isn't done for "free" as would be the case for the USO where the cost is shown to be less than £3,400. Likewise it was yourself who paid for your sewage treatment plant rather than the water/waste authority.

To what extent should the state pay for the installation of infrastructure considered to be commercially non viable and what should be the source of those funds? I don't know the answer. I have mixed views. I'm sympathetic for those living in remote and expensive areas but whilst there is a strong case to be argued for the "less well off" to be assisted should the lord of the manor also get it for free? An no, whilst I don't like the thought of means testing I would probably resent contributing to the installation costs of someone far better off than myself. Apologies for the diatribe. It wasn't aimed at your personally but at the problem as a whole.
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Tue 18-Feb-20 23:48:12
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MCM] [link to this post]
 
it isn't done for "free" as would be the case for the USO where the cost is shown to be less than £3,400.

no, but I also don't pay an ongoing fee to the water company for sewerage either, whereas I would pay an ongoing fee for broadband.
The state pays for lots of infrastructure that is used by only a small number of people. Where that expenditure enables economic activity that results in tax being paid it is usually described as an "investment". I work for an overseas based company, so I bring money in to the UK, and pay UK tax (quite a lot of it, so you'd probably resent it if my broadband installation was subsidised). However, the existing phone USO and future broadband USO is in place as the importance of both are recognised in order to avoid social exclusion and to promote economic activity. The £3,400 limit is there as that is seen to be a level where the "investment" is worth it. However, whereas the phone USO service has remained adequate throughout its lifetime, I believe the broadband USO is already inadequate before it comes into force - although it may avoid some social exclusion, it won't allow any worthwhile economic activity. Unfortunately, politicians don't understand the issues. It is all a bit of a mess IMO.
Standard User uno
(knowledge is power) Wed 19-Feb-20 01:13:46
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: sheephouse] [link to this post]
 
Mostly correct but they are toying with the ideal of entire copper removal...

https://www.thinkbroadband.com/news/8480-ofcom-propo...

Matt

uno Communications
t: 0333 773 7700
uno Speedtest
Standard User burble
(member) Wed 19-Feb-20 08:52:41
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: uno] [link to this post]
 
BT have been talking to Ofcom about removal of copper network by 2027, they are hoping to start removing copper from my area next year!
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Wed 19-Feb-20 09:29:46
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: burble] [link to this post]
 
I can believe they will have copper removal in some trial areas this decade, but the overall job will take decades I'm sure.
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 19-Feb-20 10:09:26
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: burble] [link to this post]
 
When a lot of people talk about removal they just mean switching off and leaving in the ground for now.

If referring to the Salisbury and MIldenhall trials they are about getting people switched to voice over broadband, be that voice over FTTP, G.fast or VDSL2. In the Mildenhall area the copper will be needed for the G.fast and VDSL2 signals

In Salisbury while the WLR switch off will mean use of full fibre by everyone, there has been no discussion of actual removal of the copper yet. In fact copper in place is a disaster recovery for the one or two properties where something MUST be copper based for some reason and of course LLU MPF services.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User chris_owen
(newbie) Wed 19-Feb-20 17:53:58
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
I'm new to the forum so I hope i'm in the right place.
We are a village of over 400 houses without FTTC although we are only 1.2 miles from the exchange. Openreach say we are in an Open Market Review location, meaning they have to allow other providers in to our area. I have contacted all the other providers who say they have no plans. Stalemate.
So I want to do a USO application. Does anyone know how to do this, what is needed, and who it is sent to ? Regarding the £3,400 cost limit, how do we find out what the total cost is ?
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 19-Feb-20 18:28:40
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: chris_owen] [link to this post]
 
USO is not in place yet for broadband, need to wait for March

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User ian72
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 20-Feb-20 08:35:38
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: chris_owen] [link to this post]
 
What is the 4G signal like in the area from the different providers? If it is over 10/1 then you would probably be provided via 4G with USO anyway (and you could get 4G now relatively cheaply, the only question is whether BT would pay anything towards it, like possibly the router, if you wait another 6 weeks.
Standard User candlerb
(experienced) Sun 05-Apr-20 10:37:38
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: chris_owen] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by chris_owen:
I'm new to the forum so I hope i'm in the right place.
We are a village of over 400 houses without FTTC although we are only 1.2 miles from the exchange. Openreach say we are in an Open Market Review location, meaning they have to allow other providers in to our area. I have contacted all the other providers who say they have no plans. Stalemate.
So I want to do a USO application. Does anyone know how to do this, what is needed, and who it is sent to ? Regarding the £3,400 cost limit, how do we find out what the total cost is ?


Given you're only 1.2 miles from the exchange, what speed do you get on ADSL? If it's 10Mbps or higher then you won't be eligible for USO.

Do you have a decent 4G signal from any of the operators? If so, USO will tell you to use 4G. They may contribute £99 for installation of an external antenna if necessary to get a 10Mbps+ speed.

If neither of those is true, then you can apply to BT for USO. They will decide the most suitable technology and will determine the total cost, and if it exceeds the threshold, they will tell you how much extra you would have to pay. There is "assumed demand aggregation", so if a cluster of 10 properties could be served from the same distribution point they'll assume that 7 of them will order service at some point, meaning 7 x £3,400 is available from the USO fund.
Standard User ian72
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Mon 06-Apr-20 11:06:25
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: candlerb] [link to this post]
 
As far as ADSL is concerned the original USO would mean ADSL wouldn't normally support the upstream requirements but I do remember an article from MrS I think last week that suggested they seem to be ignoring the upload requirement and basing USO on only the download.
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 06-Apr-20 13:33:41
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: ian72] [link to this post]
 
ADSL is always sub 10 Mbps

ADSL2+ is where it gets all funky and the old Ofcom presumption that a 11 or 12 Mbps ADSL2+ line will sync at 1.1 or 1.2 Mbps upload is impacting the USO. Original hope had been that there would be a bit of leeway but that hope is gone.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User sheephouse
(member) Mon 06-Apr-20 15:59:44
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
My ADSL2+ line syncs higher a day or two after it has been raining (it is underground, so I guess the capacitance changes or something), and I have a max observed speed of 1.1Mbps upload which rules out USO, even though most of the time it is well under that.
I also notice that the predicted downstream range has been revised upwards, from 4.5-12.5 to 6.5-13.5, although the downstream line rate is still given as up to 8Mbps.
I'd only been keeping the line in the vain hope USO would help, but as it won't I'll be cancelling the line altogether and I'll rely on 4G instead.
Standard User Stevie_Ray
(newbie) Mon 13-Apr-20 13:59:07
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
I'm investigating USO at the moment for a village with general download speeds in the 1 - 2 mbps range (Cudham in Kent). BT only refer me to a 4G router - EE - with 30gb download monthly limit, BUT they cannot tell me whether the EE signal will even work (other than looking at a mobile coverage map). So how do I know it would be any good ?

I also will be prompting several hundred residents to apply to BT - surely it would be in BT's interests to put up a temporary service which will serve the whole community - rather than a house by house approach ?
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 13-Apr-20 14:25:28
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: Stevie_Ray] [link to this post]
 
What temporary service do you propose?

There are other 4G services out there and some with unlimited allowances for less money. Which is best is experimentation.

The BT packages mean that if speeds are sub 10 Mbps they will try adding an external area for you.

There should be some aggregation going on with the USO, but the desk of staff is somewhat limited at present and looking at area, best solutions are

1. Roll out FTTP
or
2. Enable cabinet 9 for VDSL2

Both will have lead times of around a year.

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User Stevie_Ray
(newbie) Mon 13-Apr-20 15:36:53
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Thanks for that. Most of the area is served by two exchanges which are on Openreach's plans for FTTP - however, as they serve urban areas as well as our rural area, we will be last on the list and "only if it costs in" (Openreach quote). FTTC out of the question due to cost (unless you can aggregate the £3,400 s !!). Re temporary service, I would have thought BT could put in some sort of mobile signal booster for the area = lots more custom for them as it would attract residents away from other ISPs ?

PS - I have already managed (via various means) to bring faster broadband to the general area over the last 4 years - but I ran out of money for Cudham !!!!
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 13-Apr-20 16:44:23
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Re: Universal Service Obligation (USO)


[re: Stevie_Ray] [link to this post]
 
Temporary 4G exists only as emergency replacement of an existing mast.

Cost of deploying a mast for these premises is probably not unlike FTTP or FTTC depending on topography etc

If both exchanges are on the Fibre First/Fibre VIllage roll-out list then there is your answer i.e. wait for that to happen

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User boxst
(fountain of knowledge) Wed 03-Jun-20 20:35:00
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How does this work?


[re: JT_WHC] [link to this post]
 
Due to sad twists of life, I am going to move back to a house that I was in 20 years ago. I was one of the first to campaign for ADSL and managed to get BT to install it in the town just as I moved out.

However, much to my surprise the house never did get ‘proper’ broadband and the checkers now show just 5.5mbps. As the USO is 10mbps how do I go about applying?

Thanks,

Steve
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Wed 03-Jun-20 23:22:08
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Re: How does this work?


[re: boxst] [link to this post]
 
https;//www.bt.com/USO

If that offers you 4G then you can pick on of the USO tariffs - though might be better off with other EE Sim and your own router.

If it says to call them, then they think no 4G possible and they might start a FTTP on demand order (emphasis on might)

The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Standard User boxst
(fountain of knowledge) Thu 04-Jun-20 11:25:05
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Re: How does this work?


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Thank you Andrew. It offers me a 4G router.

As you have suggested, I will just get an EE unlimited SIM as that looks as though it’ll be in excess of 50mbps. Still a disappointment to come from 300mbps to not only a slower speed but the inconsistency of a mobile connection.
Standard User boxst
(fountain of knowledge) Sun 14-Jun-20 20:20:25
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Re: How does this work?


[re: boxst] [link to this post]
 
Just replying to myself. I have EE now with a Tp-Link Archer router and get a consistent 25mb down and 10mb up. Not brilliant but much better than the landline.
Standard User alexatkin
(member) Sun 14-Jun-20 22:25:31
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Re: How does this work?


[re: boxst] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by boxst:
Just replying to myself. I have EE now with a Tp-Link Archer router and get a consistent 25mb down and 10mb up. Not brilliant but much better than the landline.


Is that a proper 4G router or with a dongle?

If its the latter, you may get better speeds from a proper 4G router.
Standard User boxst
(fountain of knowledge) Sun 14-Jun-20 22:29:18
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Re: How does this work?


[re: alexatkin] [link to this post]
 
It’s a proper 4G router, however I just swapped it for a different one that I had lying around (as you do) and now I’m getting 45mb/down and 20mb up.

I’m surprised as it is an old HUAWEI B310 and I thought the TP-Link was better...
Standard User godsell4
(member) Sun 28-Jun-20 10:38:44
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Re: How does this work?


[re: boxst] [link to this post]
 
Do you have enough people nearby that would be willing to stump up about £500/property and get FTTP via a Community Fibre Partnership?

Gigaclear FTTP 300Mb on Order
Three HomeFi 15 to 20Mb.

PlusNet Unlimited Fibre an unreliable 3Mb
Standard User Fastman3
(learned) Sun 28-Jun-20 11:49:43
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Re: How does this work?


[re: godsell4] [link to this post]
 
Godsells - think you should rephase your comment- not sure how you think you a CFP would be £500 a premises when i assume you have no quote for the area in question that the person is asking about or any understanding of the local network conditions for the premises in question - the figures if they are based on your area will be very misleading , probably massively incorrect and cause the community no end of trouble if tyhey get a cost from Openreach that would be massively different from the 500 you have set an incorrect expectation on . CFP is determined by number of premises and the infrastructure required (both of those are specific to the communtiy in question)
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