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Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 01-Nov-10 13:00:06
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: yarwell] [link to this post]
 
That would be an eight year contract to supply services, rather than York funding a wider roll-out.

H2O was fairly successful with its business services. So its see where things go, I would not be shocked if it was a re-focus to remove FibreCity and just focus on the business side of things, or only enable wider areas when partnership funding is available.

The window of opportunity has vanished now, VM cable speeds and the BT fibre roll-outs mean that unless targetting a final third area you will have two or three competitors.

Andrew Ferguson, [email protected]
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Mon 01-Nov-10 13:41:13
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
"H2O was fairly successful with its business services."

Well yes. Cost per connect doesn't really matter much when there's only a handful of endpoints and the customers are willing to pay LOTS for bandwidth. Change to a mass market retail model and you can't afford £500 (or anything like that) per customer connect. You can only afford microtrenching, and even that's arguable.

"The window of opportunity has vanished now, VM cable speeds and the BT fibre roll-outs mean that unless targetting a final third area you will have two or three competitors."

Hence the not-spots trial on Anglesey?

Except their earlier silliness has destroyed any credibility they might have had?
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 01-Nov-10 13:56:14
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
If the sewer agreement for Bournemouth had gone through I think Bournemouth roll-out would be more attractive.

Remember at this time the company as far as anyone is saying publically is still a going concern, so don't write them off totally yet.

Andrew Ferguson, [email protected]
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.


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Anonymous
(Unregistered)Mon 01-Nov-10 22:56:44
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by MrSaffron:
If the sewer agreement for Bournemouth had gone through I think Bournemouth roll-out would be more attractive.

Remember at this time the company as far as anyone is saying publically is still a going concern, so don't write them off totally yet.


I believe you are correct with your summisation that they will disbnd the Fibrecity concept altogether.

From what I'm hearing if and I am told it's a very big if, they can get a refinancing deal put together, they will purely concentrate on the business side of the market through H2O Networks but again with all H2O Networks projects currently suspended it will take some time to rebuild consumer confidence in their business.

Just one point on the use of sewers, the Fibrecity model will never really work with sewers as the number of cables needed is far too great especially given that smaller sewers can only take single cables.

The use of sewers is though perfect for point to piont or Fibrering type installations as the cost savings can be huge and certainly give any Telecommunications company a distinct advantage over their competitors if they can install in the sewers
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Mon 01-Nov-10 23:11:01
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
[a different anon]

Apparently it's not quite £500 per connect. Courtesy of a link herdwick recently posted on the i3 news article, we know that i3 say "we have connected homes using our sewer based technology for around GBP£350 and GBP£450". Frankly I reckon that makes the original £500 per customer guesses round here a damn good guesstimate; either way £400 vs £500 is not going to massively change the economics of their business plan(s).

What's not 100% clear is where they draw the line between "sewer based technology" (which hopefully is fine for a simple network with a few access points) and a mass market technology where everyone gets a possible access point (where they've, entirely predictably, not been using the sewers).

http://au.i3-asiapacific.com/news--media/press-relea...
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Sat 20-Nov-10 13:31:17
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Any news?

Also, according to your news item dated 6 Oct, i3/h2o/whoever should have been going live about now with their WiMax/4g trialists on Anglesey. Don't suppose there's any news from there either, is there (nothing on the i3 website news since 14 Oct, talking about Brisbane)?

http://www.thinkbroadband.com/news/4412-anglesey-set...
Administrator MrSaffron
(staff) Mon 22-Nov-10 13:18:35
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
No news that I can see, did see something about two director's leaving but given the delay was for a re-structure then that is expected.

A case of wait and see

Andrew Ferguson, [email protected]
www.thinkbroadband.com - formerly known as ADSLguide.org.uk
The author of the above post is a thinkbroadband staff member. It may not constitute an official statement on behalf of thinkbroadband.
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Tue 07-Dec-10 10:08:57
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: MrSaffron] [link to this post]
 
Bournemouth Echo yesterday:

http://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/8706262.___A_l...
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Sat 11-Dec-10 23:13:53
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
Ignore what is being spoken of about the Wessex Water issue- it is a cover story, the i3 group has had and still has major financial issues and owes huge sums of money to creditors all over, dont forget the Fibrecity project in Dundee was also stopped yet there was no issue with the water company there- Scottish Water, in fact i3 made a point of telling everyone how good the relationship was with them there.

Given the stories I am hearing the last thing anyone should do is commit money to this company.
Anonymous
(Unregistered)Tue 18-Jan-11 15:59:41
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Re: Fibrecity Bournemouth and Dundee


[re: Anonymous] [link to this post]
 
Any new information on financial problems?
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