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Standard User G1NZO
(regular) Mon 19-Aug-19 09:30:59
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AP for useless SKY Wifi


[link to this post]
 
The Wifi Range and reliability of our Sky ER115 router is next to useless
Constant disconnections and the range is hopeless
as we are doing some building work i wonder if it would be possible to use and External AP mounted on the ceiling like Ubiquiti Unify UAP Wireless Access Point
I know this is POE but thats no problem as i have a POE switch or even just an injector
I read about needing software on a PC to set these up
is that just a one off config process or is it a controller that needs to be run at all times

If not the Ubiquiti then what other Ceiling mounted AP have people tried

I wont have Powerline adaptors and the Netgear plug in Repeaters dont do it either
The house is a Large open plan Bungalow and i have a nice central area that the AP can be mounted in giving coverage to all areas

Any suggestions welcome
Standard User caffn8me
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Tue 20-Aug-19 02:57:58
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: G1NZO] [link to this post]
 
I use the Unifi AP-AC-LR as the standard indoor access point in most installations I've done and although it's not the fastest in the Unifi range, I've always had very good results with it on mobile devices.

The controller is only needed to set access points up and you can then turn it off, using it only when you need to make changes to the setup.

One thing you have to consider is the wifi environment. The problems you're having may not be due to poor wif on the ER115 but because there are so many neighbouring access points on the same or adjacent channels causing interference and high channel utilization. A new access point can't change this but take a look with a wi-fi survey app and decide whether channel 1, 6 or 11 looks best for 2.4GHz.

Interference on 2.4GHz is a much bigger issue than on 5GHz which doesn't penetrate walls as well.

What I do at home, where there are numerous neighbouring access points on non-recommended 2.4GHz channels (I can currently see APs on channels 1,3,4,6,8,9,10 & 11), is use 5GHz on a DFS channel above 100 with a maximum transmit power of 25dBm. DFS can be problematic though if you live in an area with a lot of radar activity.

I've got two solid brick walls and an additional layer of plasterboard between where I'm sitting at the moment and the access point and on an iPad Mini 4 I can pull 330Mbps over the wi-fi. It's not a great distance - only about 5-6m but the walls are a significant obstacle.

There's nothing to stop you keeping the ER115 running wi-fi and adding an access point some distance from it to give better coverage. One site I have uses two indoor Unifi APs, two outdoor APs and an Apple Airport Extreme - all running happily together.

What I'd strongly suggest if you're having building work done is to get whichever AP you want to use sooner rather than later and use a long ethernet cable to move it around the house to test for optimum position so that a permanent cable can be put in before all the building work is finished. It may be that running wifi with both the ER115 and a separate AP, a central location won't be the best place to put the AP. Have a think about where exactly you'd like to have the very fastest wifi and work things backwards from that. Run with 5GHz on high power and 2.4GHz on the lowest power that works with things. A lot of IoT devices/televisions/media players only work on 2.4GHz so you may need to experiment a bit.

An in-wall access point would be a good choice too - if you can get ethernet to it. These have the advantage that they're very unobtrusive and have ethernet ports on the bottom that you can hardwire clients into - things like printers or desktops (or even the television). The two standard Unifi in-wall models have two output ethernet ports and the HD model has four.

Good luck and keep us updated with progress.

Sarah

--
If I can't drink my bowl of coffee three times daily, then in my torment, I will shrivel up like a piece of roast goat

Spiders on coffee - Badass spiders on drugs
Standard User baby_frogmella
(knowledge is power) Tue 20-Aug-19 08:19:44
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: G1NZO] [link to this post]
 
Since you will still need to user the Sky router if using an AP why not keep things simple and replace the Sky router altogether? For an open plan bungalow, a single decent router should easily provide full wifi coverage. If money is no object then go for the TP Link VR2800, otherwise the VR900 is a good balance between cost & performance. If you choose the single router option, just be aware that not all router manufacturers support Sky connections (they need to support DHCP Option 60/61). TP Link, Billion, Netgear & Asus are the only ones I know of which have Option 60/61 hardcoded in the settings provided you choose 'Sky MER' as the ISP.

FluidOne FTTPoD 330/30 Mbps
Linksys EA9500v2


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Standard User jabuzzard
(committed) Tue 20-Aug-19 10:22:02
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: caffn8me] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by caffn8me:
The controller is only needed to set access points up and you can then turn it off, using it only when you need to make changes to the setup.


Note you don't even need the controller. I used the Android app, a USB OTG adaptor and a USB ethernet adaptor to set mine up. You could use the WiFi on your Sky router instead too before you switch it off.

In reply to a post by caffn8me:
I've got two solid brick walls and an additional layer of plasterboard between where I'm sitting at the moment and the access point and on an iPad Mini 4 I can pull 330Mbps over the wi-fi. It's not a great distance - only about 5-6m but the walls are a significant obstacle.


The UniFi app has a signal strength planner. That is put in a plan of your house, feed in the wall types and you can then drop access points on and it will give you an idea of the signal strengths. I used this to determine that a single UniFi AC-LR placed in the correct location would give me good signal coverage throughout my house.

In reply to a post by caffn8me:
There's nothing to stop you keeping the ER115 running wi-fi and adding an access point some distance from it to give better coverage. One site I have uses two indoor Unifi APs, two outdoor APs and an Apple Airport Extreme - all running happily together.


I would avoid that at all costs. Roaming between the access points won't work properly and it becomes a nightmare.

In reply to a post by caffn8me:
What I'd strongly suggest if you're having building work done is to get whichever AP you want to use sooner rather than later and use a long ethernet cable to move it around the house to test for optimum position so that a permanent cable can be put in before all the building work is finished. It may be that running wifi with both the ER115 and a separate AP, a central location won't be the best place to put the AP. Have a think about where exactly you'd like to have the very fastest wifi and work things backwards from that. Run with 5GHz on high power and 2.4GHz on the lowest power that works with things. A lot of IoT devices/televisions/media players only work on 2.4GHz so you may need to experiment a bit.

An in-wall access point would be a good choice too - if you can get ethernet to it. These have the advantage that they're very unobtrusive and have ethernet ports on the bottom that you can hardwire clients into - things like printers or desktops (or even the television). The two standard Unifi in-wall models have two output ethernet ports and the HD model has four.


I have to say indoors I much prefer ceiling mounted ones over wall mounted. Far less obtrusive IMHO. The new UniFI Nano HD is very interesting. is only 16cm in diameter and has a low profile mounting option, and a bunch of "skins" to camouflage it. Though to be honest most people have white ceilings, don't spend much time gazing at them and any of the ceiling access points from Ubiquiti are no more obtrusive than a smoke detector. The law in Scotland requires me to have one of those in the lounge, one in the hallway upstairs and downstairs, a carbon monoxide detector in the lounge, and a heat detector in the kitchen (and will apply to everyone in Scotland from 1/2/2021 too, get fitting now it's retrospective), so one extra for WiFi is meh.

I would also say consider if you want WiFi in the garden. Maybe run some external grade Cat6 or SWA Cat6 and fit one or more UniFi AC-M access points. Much easier to get those runs in now while you are having building work done.

Personally I think get sufficient ceiling drops to cover you for 2.4 and 5 GHz with Cat6a and your golden for ~50 years on not needing to do more cabling. I personally very much doubt the 60Gz things will ever take off because you need at least one access point per room (more if it is L shaped etc. and it can't be overcome it a physics limitation) and if you really need the speed plug it in. There is IMHO about one more iteration possible in gaining more speed from 2.4 and 5 GHz WiFi and then you are at the physics limit (yes these limits really do exist).

One way to eek more speed for your WiFi is to make all the fixed devices wired. So things like smart TV's that don't move get some Cat5/6 to them. Same for a desktop PC or even a laptop if you use it on the same desk most of the time. Reserve the WiFi for mobile devices like phones and tablets. If your having building work done put some structured cabling in.
Standard User caffn8me
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Tue 20-Aug-19 11:46:48
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
I would avoid that at all costs. Roaming between the access points won't work properly and it becomes a nightmare.
Roaming is handled by the client, not by the access points, and a controller doesn't manage roaming even when running. Roaming works fine in the several situations where I've seen Unifi APs alongsde an existing consumer wifi router. The only thing an all Unifi setup would allow you to do is to set things like min RSSI on every access point, but even then, clients can ignore this and roam badly.

The in wall APs are tiny (about the same size as a UK 2-gang socket) and give good coverage. I've just put a single UAP-AC-IW-PRO in a very large living room - and it happily covers an area of 14.5m x 10m.

Sarah

--
If I can't drink my bowl of coffee three times daily, then in my torment, I will shrivel up like a piece of roast goat

Spiders on coffee - Badass spiders on drugs
Standard User PhilipD
(experienced) Tue 20-Aug-19 12:25:00
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: G1NZO] [link to this post]
 
Hi

A ceiling mounted access point will be the best thing, easily outperforming any other type of router sat somewhere in a room even if they do sport go faster antenna.

We had similar issues with poor Wi-Fi in our home and since putting in a ceiling mounted Wi-Fi AP the range issues have all gone. PoE makes the job easier as well as you just need to get a network cable into the loft or ceiling space.

Its the height that can make the real difference as well as a centralised location. We even use 5GHz across the entire house without issues.

I've used a Uni-Fi AP and not too impressed at least for home use, they are quite complicated to set up requiring a PC with software on. They are really designed for organisations managing many of them. Firmware updates often required having to update their own software on the PC first, sometimes Java would then complain, before you could go about updating the firmware on the device. If you were doing that once and then having it go off and update 100 APs you'd save time and effort, but for home use, you didn't gain any time savings or ease of use.

My recommendation is a ZyXel NWA-1123ACv2 access point. These have their own web-browser for local management similar to a router so you don't need to set up software on a PC (but can work cloud based if wanted). It's built like a tank, compared with the Uni-Fi units, the Uni-Fi feel cheap and flimsy and run quite hot in comparison. I've found devices stay connected to the ZyXel without any issues and it just works, running for months at a time and only being rebooted for the odd firmware update.

Hope that helps.

Regards

Phil
Standard User caffn8me
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Tue 20-Aug-19 13:03:29
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: PhilipD] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by PhilipD:
I've used a Uni-Fi AP and not too impressed at least for home use, they are quite complicated to set up requiring a PC with software on.
The Unifi App for Android or Windows functions as a controller to set access points up.

Sarah

--
If I can't drink my bowl of coffee three times daily, then in my torment, I will shrivel up like a piece of roast goat

Spiders on coffee - Badass spiders on drugs
Standard User jabuzzard
(committed) Tue 20-Aug-19 13:13:36
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: caffn8me] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by caffn8me:
In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
I would avoid that at all costs. Roaming between the access points won't work properly and it becomes a nightmare.
Roaming is handled by the client, not by the access points, and a controller doesn't manage roaming even when running. Roaming works fine in the several situations where I've seen Unifi APs alongsde an existing consumer wifi router. The only thing an all Unifi setup would allow you to do is to set things like min RSSI on every access point, but even then, clients can ignore this and roam badly.

The in wall APs are tiny (about the same size as a UK 2-gang socket) and give good coverage. I've just put a single UAP-AC-IW-PRO in a very large living room - and it happily covers an area of 14.5m x 10m.


Sorry but that is incorrect.

Proper roaming is both client and access point lead. See the specifications for 802.11r and 802.11k. Admittedly as far as I can tell the Ubiquiti stuff does not do proper roaming, other than supporting 802.11r (fast BSS transition) and being able to set a minimum RSSI on the access points. There is no support for 802.11k which is the second critical technology for roaming to work seamlessly. What should happen is that the access point determines that client is moving away from it. It informs client to prepare to switch to a new access point. The client requests list of nearby access points. The access point gives site report, finally using 802.11r the client moves to best access point based on the report. I guess this might need a running cloud controller in UniFi world but in theory it could run high availability on the access points themselves.

Things like the BT Whole Home WiFi does do proper roaming (both 802.11r and 802.11k), but does not do PoE which is a bit naff if you want to ceiling mount them.

As regards in wall access points unless you have them high up on the wall furniture is going to get in the way a lot of the time and high up on the wall is far more obtrusive than on the ceiling IMHO. Ceiling mounted is also far less susceptible to damage than low down wall mounted.
Standard User PhilipD
(experienced) Tue 20-Aug-19 13:35:24
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: caffn8me] [link to this post]
 
Hi

I didn't want another app on my phone so just stuck with Windows software, maybe the app was easier I don't know.

The point really I think is the app or software is overkill for a single AP in a home as it doesn't make anything easier and was making the user "plan" an installation by asking questions that a home user may not know the answer to, plus it was another step required.

Granted if you have dozens of APs its a win-win, and that is the market Uni-Fi are targeting, those needing to manage many APs, rather than the home user, hence no easy Web interface to manage a single AP.

Regards

Phil

Edited by PhilipD (Tue 20-Aug-19 13:36:13)

Standard User caffn8me
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Tue 20-Aug-19 14:32:30
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
Standard recommendation on Unifi is to disable fast roaming as it can cause problems with clients which don't support 802.11r. As such, the roaming is indeed handled by the client.

The in wall APs are no more susceptible to damage than sockets at the same height. I suspect that you've never actually tried one. I was surprised at how good a performance I got when I first used one at normal socket level - even surrounded by furniture. High up access points are nice but aren't always acceptable from an aesthetic point of view and aesthetics are very important to many.

Not everyone wants the very fastest wifi possible, many just want reliable wifi, everywhere, and fast enough to do what they need to do. This may only be web browsing, email, or connecting to a printer. Even watching 4K streaming doesn't need ultrafast wifi.

Sarah

--
If I can't drink my bowl of coffee three times daily, then in my torment, I will shrivel up like a piece of roast goat

Spiders on coffee - Badass spiders on drugs
Standard User PhilipD
(experienced) Tue 20-Aug-19 14:36:02
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
Hi

As regards in wall access points unless you have them high up on the wall furniture is going to get in the way a lot of the time and high up on the wall is far more obtrusive than on the ceiling IMHO. Ceiling mounted is also far less susceptible to damage than low down wall mounted.


Quite agree, also the wall access point is usually optimised for sending it's signal in-front of it, that might be okay where it's installed specifically to provide coverage only in front of it, but might not suit so well inside the home where its needed to provide all round coverage.

Regards

Phil
Standard User quadrophenic
(newbie) Wed 21-Aug-19 10:44:03
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: G1NZO] [link to this post]
 
I am using the Omada range from Tp-Link. They are pretty good, very similar to the ubiquiti range but a bit cheaper. The EAP225 gives good wifi range and speeds. PoE powered using the included injector or through your PoE switch.
They can be run using the TP-Link controller software running on a PC or they can be configured in standalone mode without any controller.

You will need to be running the controller if you want features such as mesh or fast roaming but for a single AP setup it will be fine as a standalone.

Have to admit they arent as good looking as the ubiquiti range though
Standard User jabuzzard
(committed) Wed 21-Aug-19 10:57:51
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: caffn8me] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by caffn8me:
Standard recommendation on Unifi is to disable fast roaming as it can cause problems with clients which don't support 802.11r. As such, the roaming is indeed handled by the client.


If there is no 802.11r/802.11k involved then it's not roaming. It's the signal has gone from access point A, let me try and reconnect, look there is access point B I can attach to. That is not roaming.

Roaming is where the device and/or access point goes you are getting a bit far away, here is a list of alternative access points to try let me speed up the connection for you and hand over before you drop the connection on the first access point giving you a seamless connection, even your IP address should not change. This would be very difficult to do on a device unless you had an additional radio that wa constantly searching for other access points with which it could connect to that had a stronger signal. Even then you would not get the seamless handover with IP address remaining the same.

The in wall APs are no more susceptible to damage than sockets at the same height. I suspect that you've never actually tried one. I was surprised at how good a performance I got when I first used one at normal socket level - even surrounded by furniture. High up access points are nice but aren't always acceptable from an aesthetic point of view and aesthetics are very important to many.


Yes they are they have a much greater profile than a socket which is unlikely to extend beyond the skirting and are no where near as robust as a socket.

You also seem to have missed the bit about the law requiring a whole bunch of ceiling mounted, interlinked smoke, heat and carbon monoxide detectors be fitted in every home in Scotland by 1st February 2021. Though why anyone would want to live in a home without that is somewhat beyond me (death rate in homes in the event of a fire without working smoke alarms is over twice that with). As such one or two extra smoke alarm devices on the ceiling is for the majority of people - meh, and like I said you have zero choice on the aesthetics in Scotland. Unless you happen to live in a Category A listed building with some ornate plaster ceiling and can get an exception and there are only 3707 of those in total in the whole of Scotland so hardly relevant.

Most people don't spend time looking at the ceiling and most ceiling's are white with the ceiling mounted devices also being white they have a tendency to blend in so you really do not notice them day to day.
Standard User PhilipD
(experienced) Wed 21-Aug-19 11:24:04
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
Hi

Most people don't spend time looking at the ceiling and most ceiling's are white with the ceiling mounted devices also being white they have a tendency to blend in so you really do not notice them day to day.


This is true. On our landing we have a smoke detector, access point (the ZyXel which looks like a second smoke detector), internal burglar alarm sounder, a motion sensor for the lights, and tucked in the corner a PIR for the alarm, with the lamp pendant and shade hanging from the ceiling as well in the middle! It's pretty busy with stuff and I was a bit paranoid it looked a bit over the top.

So when people visit or we have guests stay at some point I've ended up asking what they think about all the devices attached to the landing ceiling, they look up, and say, "Oh never noticed", this is despite the access point having an LED and the PIR LED flashing as people walk through.

People don't tend to look up, if they do, they really don't take any notice of things on the ceiling, given it's pretty common in homes and offices to see things like that attached.

Regards

Phil
Standard User gary333
(member) Wed 21-Aug-19 11:36:35
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
I think like you say if you're going to have to have smoke alarms in your living room then an extra one isn't going to make much difference.

I wouldn't want ugly smoke alarms or AP's hanging off my living room ceiling though. In Scotland many properties have high ceilings which would have less visual impact. With most houses in England built within the last 50 years having ceilings around 235cm - 238cm then these boxes are a bit of an eyesore.

I think this is the reason by BT Whole Home have feet so they can be put in a corner somewhere and not look too out of place.

I don't mind on alarms/AP's on landing, office, kitchens as these are working rooms, but in rooms i relax in like bedrooms and living rooms I personally wouldn't want to see them. I've been looking at Nest smoke alarms. Not because I want the features, just because they actually looks relatively pleasant.
Standard User caffn8me
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Wed 21-Aug-19 21:55:46
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
If there is no 802.11r/802.11k involved then it's not roaming. It's the signal has gone from access point A, let me try and reconnect, look there is access point B I can attach to. That is not roaming.
I stand corrected. Thank you for pointing out my basic rookie mistake.

In my defence I'd point out that it was just something I read on the internet and it's an easy error to make. Even the Wi-Fi Alliance® gets it wrong;
How does a client roam?

The decision to roam from a connected access point to a new access point is generally the responsibility of the wireless client device. The roaming algorithms used by wireless client devices vary from vendor to vendor, but almost always involve the evaluation of the received signal strength indicator (RSSI). As a user moves away from the connected AP, the signal degrades. The client compares the received signal strength to a pre-defined threshold and determines if a roam is required. Once the signal drops below this threshold, the wireless client performs an off-channel scan, scanning all available channels for a candidate AP, selects one with acceptable signal strength, and completes the roaming process by connecting or associating to the new AP. Some more sophisticated clients utilize additional parameters such as AP neighbor lists or capacity load on an AP to help optimize the roaming process.
In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
[in wall access points] have a much greater profile than a socket which is unlikely to extend beyond the skirting and are no where near as robust as a socket.
I see what you mean. Should the sockets go on the ceiling as well if things that stick out are going to be plugged into them?

In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
You also seem to have missed the bit about the law requiring a whole bunch of ceiling mounted, interlinked smoke, heat and carbon monoxide detectors be fitted in every home in Scotland by 1st February 2021.
Forgive me. I didnít overlook it, I ignored it as I wrongly assumed that Scottish law didnít apply in the French Riviera. Do you know if this will change after Brexit?

Sarah

--
If I can't drink my bowl of coffee three times daily, then in my torment, I will shrivel up like a piece of roast goat

Spiders on coffee - Badass spiders on drugs
Standard User G1NZO
(regular) Thu 22-Aug-19 00:15:10
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: PhilipD] [link to this post]
 
Thanks to all those who took the trouble to respond

We are going with 2 x Ubiquiti UAP AC LITE
They are quite slim line and not so large

Is there any reason why they should not be placed near to Smoke detectors which are also ceiling mounted
They are AC Powered Hardwired units and i wonder if they being so close to the Ubiquite would cause any issues
2 units will give total coverage within the building
Internet access to the Garden will be hardwired to the Wooden garden building on CAT 6
Then a further outdoor POE Ubiquiti AP will be installed

Thanks for your help once done will post results
Standard User PhilipD
(experienced) Thu 22-Aug-19 08:06:41
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: G1NZO] [link to this post]
 
Hi

I would try and put as much distance as possible between the smoke detector and access point, say at least a metre. If they are very close that could affect the performance of each unit due RF interference. Certainly the access point is going to work better away from any other electrical devices.

The AC-Lite I would not recommend having had one. Build quality is poor, it's just snaps together like a cheap toy, no screws! The LSIs run very hot and the heat sinking is nothing more than a foam heat transfer pad between the back of the board and the plastic case. Plastic doesn't make a good heatsink! On my unit, the heatsink pads weren't even placed correctly behind one of the chips leaving an LSI to bake. There were also issues with devices connecting reliably, and the blue LED is over-driven to make it bright enough behind the light pipe ring that after a year it had noticeably dimmed, okay just a cosmetic issue but shows the cost cutting on these units as they should have used 2 or 3 LEDs and run them at a lower current.

This is why I ended up replacing the AC-Lite with the XyZel NWA1123, similar price but a considerable difference in build quality, anyone comparing the two in the hand would immediately understand my comments.

Just my opinion on having compared the two, there will be people that swear by the Uni-Fi products and use them in their thousands.

Edit: There are some images here of the foam pad heat sinks against the plastic case and instructions on how to "unclip" the case. https://community.ui.com/questions/How-do-you-physic...

Some images on Google do show AC-Pros with metal heat-sinks now on the chips rather than the attempt to use plastic as a heat-sink. Or they might have been retro fitted by the owner I don't know.

Regards

Phil

Edited by PhilipD (Thu 22-Aug-19 08:15:03)

Standard User caffn8me
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Thu 22-Aug-19 09:41:16
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: G1NZO] [link to this post]
 
I don't think you should have any problems with that setup, it's a good choice. The only smaller ceiling AP is the NanoHD - which is quite a bit more expensive but very nicely built. Good luck with the installation and let us know how you get on.

Sarah

--
If I can't drink my bowl of coffee three times daily, then in my torment, I will shrivel up like a piece of roast goat

Spiders on coffee - Badass spiders on drugs
Standard User jabuzzard
(committed) Thu 22-Aug-19 15:34:38
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: PhilipD] [link to this post]
 
You need clearance for air flow to the smoke detector, but 50cm should be plenty. If the smoke detector has issues with RF interference from the access point it is a PoS that is not compliant with the standards.

I would say looking at the online images the AC-Lite is a lot sleeker than the XyZel. I can't comment on the AC-Lite as I got the AC-LR which is well built and does not run hot (at least on the external of the case). Then again it's on the ceiling how robust does it need to be? The main reason for the LR over the Lite for me was the 3x3 radio instead of the 2x2. Anyway my AC-LR has been on now for over two years without a hickup.

I would also take issue with the idea that snapping together makes for a poor build quality. For example plastic clips don't vibrate loose like screws.
Standard User jabuzzard
(committed) Thu 22-Aug-19 15:42:36
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: caffn8me] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by caffn8me:
Forgive me. I didnít overlook it, I ignored it as I wrongly assumed that Scottish law didnít apply in the French Riviera. Do you know if this will change after Brexit?


Well this is a UK web site. I would further point out that all new builds in over a decade have required mains powered interlinked smoke detectors in the whole of the UK. Further a rewire or significant building works (aka an extension) would also require them to be retrofitted. The point was that ceiling mounted "smoke detector" like devices are mandatory in a very high percentage of homes in the UK so a couple extra is like I said meh.

Finally a quick Google tells me that the law in France requires that all residential properties must be fitted with at least one smoke detector since 8th March 2015. So again if you don't like the aesthetics you are screwed in French Riviera.
Standard User caffn8me
(eat-sleep-adslguide) Fri 23-Aug-19 20:14:38
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Re: AP for useless SKY Wifi


[re: jabuzzard] [link to this post]
 
In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
Well this is a UK web site.
Precisely. Not a Scottish one.
In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
Finally a quick Google tells me that the law in France requires that all residential properties must be fitted with at least one smoke detector since 8th March 2015.
You are correct.
In reply to a post by jabuzzard:
So again if you don't like the aesthetics you are screwed in French Riviera.
Not exactly.

You haven't figured into your reckoning they way they do things in France (I'd recommend reading Peter Mayle's excellent 'A Year in Provence' which is still very relevant today).

I've not seen a single smoke detector in any of the properties I've installed wi-fi at in France (nor any I haven't). French law states that one detector must be installed per floor of a building - so you can have them in corridors rather than the main rooms, meaning that acceptable aesthetics can be maintaned.

Having said that, I haven't even seen one on a corridor either. You see, the French dealt with making smoke detectors compulsory the same way they dealt with making breathalyzers compulsory; it's illegal not to have one, but there is zero penalty written into law if you don't have one. Consequently, the law gets completely ignored with impunity.

Smoke detectors are a bit of a red herring though as they're not my department. What matters to me is making sure folks get reliable wi-fi wherever they want it, and I do take into account their aesthetic wishes. The customer, after all, is always right smile

Sarah

--
If I can't drink my bowl of coffee three times daily, then in my torment, I will shrivel up like a piece of roast goat

Spiders on coffee - Badass spiders on drugs

Edited by caffn8me (Fri 23-Aug-19 20:42:25)

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